I need your help Computer Engineers!

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I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 6:44 pm

Good evening (or afternoon depending on where you reside)

I am currently a Business/IT/Computer Science student. Although all of those fields peak my interest, I've always wanted to study Computer Engineering. I am preferably looking for websites but, books, or anything I can use to study the concepts or basics of Computer Engineering will help before I decide to jump ship from these other paths. Something to let me experience a taste of what is to come. Along with this I also request if possible a little advice for pursing this as a career and possibly a small description of things you did to become successful in the field and more importantly what you methods you used to push through school.

Thank you for your help and sorry if this happens to be in the wrong section of the forums.
CPU: Intel Core-i7 2600 GPU: Nvidia GTX 770 4GB MoBo: ASRock z77 Pro4 RAM: (2x8) 16GB G.Skill 1600MHz Case: Thermaltake Commander PSU: 650W SeaSonic X SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 SSD HDD: 500GB Western Digital Green OS: Windows 7
Techgoudy
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Re: I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:03 pm

Cannot help you there, but looking at your signature we almost have that same computer components:)

Keep that 2600k until it no longer works...also if you have not overclocked it yet I suggest you do since it is the best overclocking CPU intel ever made. With tyhe 32NM process you can run 1.4 volts through it with a good cooler and probably hit 4.8-5.0ghz. Mine with a 3 year old H50 AIO cooler runs happily at 4.7 ghz @ 1.365v not breaking 60c "not bad considering I know it the cooler has to have some corrosion inside the cooling loop since the radiator is made from aluminium and the cold plate with micro channels is made from copper so i know it has to have some obstructions in the channels" . If I had a nice 240mm radiator AIO cooling system like say a corsair h100i or better yet the 240mm coolermaster AIO that has a brass radiator instead of aluminum I could easily hit 5ghz at around 1.42v.
Sandy Bridge CPU have soldered on IHS so there is no paste in between the Integrated Heatsink and the actual cpu die allowing for pretty easy cooling compared to IVY and Haswell that has paster between the IHS and the CpU die itself making the heat have to pass from the die through paste to the IHS then through more paste to the cold plate on whatever heatsink type you are using.

If IVY and Hswell Had soldered on IHS's we would be seeing much much better overclocks and lower temperatures on those chips.
Sandy bridge 2500-2600-2700k chips are the easiest chips to overclock and keep the temperatures in check.
With people running there Haswqell chips at 90c and above untill they throttle it's no surprise we are seeing chip degradation to the point that increased voltage is needed to run the chips at there stock frequencies.
2600k HT on@4705mhz 2x EVGA GTX770 4gb Classified cards running in SLI @1320 mhz core and 2003 mhz mem,mounted in CM HAF922.2xHTPC's 2xi3 2120 3.3ghz dual core,1xasus LP HD6570 1xHIS hd7750@1150core1325mem,55"PanyVT30
vargis14
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Re: I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:16 pm

vargis14 wrote:Cannot help you there, but looking at your signature we almost have that same computer components:)

Keep that 2600k until it no longer works...


Sadly, I did not get the K version of this processor for virtualization reasons, looking back at it now. I don't use the virtualization feature and I would've enjoyed the OC.
CPU: Intel Core-i7 2600 GPU: Nvidia GTX 770 4GB MoBo: ASRock z77 Pro4 RAM: (2x8) 16GB G.Skill 1600MHz Case: Thermaltake Commander PSU: 650W SeaSonic X SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 SSD HDD: 500GB Western Digital Green OS: Windows 7
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Re: I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:29 pm

Look on Coursera. (coursera.org) It's heavy on computer science but if you're very interested in computing hardware (rather than algorithms or programming or compilers) 'Computer Architecture' and 'Computer Organization' have run in the past (and will probably run again in the future). Intro to Electrical Engineering is on at the moment and is just getting to electronics, although there's quite a distance to computing. Some courses remain open after they've finished - you may still be able hop in and check out all the lectures. There are some peers of Coursera, (Udacity, MIT Open courseware, Open Yale, Stanford Online) which you could also check out. Generically these are called MOOCs and there are probably lots more than what I've listed here.

What an age we live in! :D
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Re: I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:46 pm

My recommendation as a practicing computer engineer would be to check out embedded-systems development, that is one of the big CE focus areas. Aside from courses, pick up an Arduino or .NET Gadgeteer development kit and make some cool stuff. They aren't terribly expensive and do not require any analog-electronics skill.
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Re: I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 8:10 pm

I'm definitely a fan of the hands on projects for sure, but I also realize there is a lot of theory out there and I think that theory is what I will need to focus in on. Also I have heard of places like Coursera and the others. I will have to check them for some of the basics to things like physics, electronics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science theory/programming.
CPU: Intel Core-i7 2600 GPU: Nvidia GTX 770 4GB MoBo: ASRock z77 Pro4 RAM: (2x8) 16GB G.Skill 1600MHz Case: Thermaltake Commander PSU: 650W SeaSonic X SSD: 128GB Crucial M4 SSD HDD: 500GB Western Digital Green OS: Windows 7
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Re: I need your help Computer Engineers!

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 10:56 pm

Assuming you are in the US, you need Calculus I-III, Differential Equations, Linear Algebra, Phsyics I-II, Boolean Logic, probably an introduction to electrical engineering, statistics, possible a signal processing class, microprocessor design, circuit design, assembly (perhaps a couple of different processors), C, C++, and maybe some other stuff I've forgotten. That will give you the fundamentals for a computer engineering degree. Then you can specialize and go deeper into whatever interests you.

While it will probably sound somewhat "elitist", computer engineering isn't something you "just pick up". Yes, there are a number of areas of knowledge that you can pick up on your own, microcontrollers, assembly, C, even signal processing, and math, but you won't pick up the rigor that comes with an engineering program. "Engineer" is a licensed profession in just about every state. While a lot of them exempt computer engineers from taking the PE exam and being licensed, you still have to be careful about professionally calling yourself an "engineer".

I don't want to diswade you from pursueing the knowledge, even if it is independent and not as part of a degree program. Make sure you understand digital logic. Know what is special about NAND and NOR gates. Teach yourself assembler for a couple of microcontroller platforms: AVR and PIC32 would be my suggestions, though Intel 8051 assembler wouldn't be bad either. It's ok to jump ahead and write C for an Arduino, but you need to understand what is happening underneath the covers and behind the curtain. Understand why the performance limitation are what they are. Learn why the order of variables in a structure matters, especially in a microcontroller. Learn how a memory management unit works and how virtual memory functions at the architecture level. Caching, TLBs, pipelining, etc.

I really think that if more programmer/developers understood how computers worked, we might just have less bloatware floating around.

In some sense, computer science/computer engineering make up the theoretical/applied pair that exist for the other hard sciences, though computer science can be a little more implemenation focused than other theoretical sciences.

--SS
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