Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet? So any info from IDF 14?

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Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet? So any info from IDF 14?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 6:11 am

So was there anything about the 11/10nm manufacturing process shown at IDF14 as suggested by the comments?



It's just with previous process nodes there are test chips being announced years before retail chips are available and I have not heard of anything in the 11/10nm node even existing have I missed it's announcement?

the 16/15/14nm nodes have consumer releases imminent in DRAM and Intel CPU's when there test chips were announced as far back as 2007.

Okay out of curiosity I've looked up first chip made on a manufacturing node range compared to Intel releasing a consumer chip in the same node range.

Intel 32nm SRAM chip - 18th September 2007
( http://www.intel.com/pressroom/archive/ ... corp_a.htm )

Intel 32nm retail CPU - 7th January 2010


IBM 22nm SRAM chip - 19th August 2008
( http://www.tgdaily.com/hardware-feature ... uring-lead )

Intel 22nm SRAM 22nd September 2009
( http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Desktops-and-N ... or-535201/)

Intel 22nm retail CPU - 23rd April 2012


National Nano Device Laboratories 16nm SRAM chip - 16th December 2009
( http://www.taiwantoday.tw/ct.asp?xitem=87144&CtNode=416 )
( http://semiaccurate.com/2009/12/17/taiw ... 16nm-chip/ )

There is a prototype memory unit by Toshiba at 15nm being mentioned as tested in December 2007 as well
http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/new ... ory-tested

Intel 14nm retail CPU - ?


So we are looking at, at least 4 years from first test chip announced to a retail chip on a node with no 11/10nm test chips being announced that I can find.

Has anyone seen an announcement of these yet?
Last edited by Ushio01 on Thu Sep 11, 2014 4:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 6:23 am

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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 6:32 am

DancinJack wrote:Intel "14nm" CPU - Q42014

"10nm":
http://www.samsung.com/global/business/ ... doPeriod=A

http://www.bit-tech.net/news/hardware/2 ... -roadmap/1

http://www.tsmc.com/english/dedicatedFo ... ure_rd.htm - I wouldn't count on TSMC being on time if history is any indication.



The Samsung memory chips are what Samsung call 10nm class and are 19nm this has been known for a while the other 2 links are to road maps with no mention of confirmed manufactured test chips.

Anyone can do a roadmap with what they want to make I was wondering if there was proof of actual physical chips.
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 6:39 am

I know, I didn't find anything so I was just posting some info about possibly when something would come up.
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 8:24 am

If Intel has any 10 nm test chips, I'd expect them to be showed off at IDF in two weeks. Par Intel tradition, they'll show test wafers a few years before productions chips using it reach the market (2013 they were showing off 14 nm test chips).
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 8:42 am

the wrote:If Intel has any 10 nm test chips, I'd expect them to be showed off at IDF in two weeks. Par Intel tradition, they'll show test wafers a few years before productions chips using it reach the market (2013 they were showing off 14 nm test chips).


If Intel do they would probably be CPU's correct? Intel doesn't normally show off SRAM or DRAM I believe?

If those are correct then were are all the other companies test chips? It really does look like the next few node processes are all going to be Intel alone.
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 9:00 am

Ushio01 wrote:If Intel do they would probably be CPU's correct? Intel doesn't normally show off SRAM or DRAM I believe?

If those are correct then were are all the other companies test chips? It really does look like the next few node processes are all going to be Intel alone.


You posted a link yourself of an Intel 32nm SRAM chip. I doubt Intel is going to show off a working 10nm CPU until 2015, and more likely 2016.

I posted a link above that at least TSMC is going 10nm and beyond. It just gets harder when things are this small.
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 2:00 pm

Yes Intel uses SRAM chips. Pretty sure everybody does because it's a simple and easily testable chip design.

You are actually two weeks early on your thread! Intel's IDF is the second week in September, and Intel has announced they plan to show off 14nm chips and 10nm wafers at the event.

http://www.kitguru.net/components/cpu/a ... september/
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Thu Aug 28, 2014 6:12 pm

DancinJack wrote:
You posted a link yourself of an Intel 32nm SRAM chip. I doubt Intel is going to show off a working 10nm CPU until 2015, and more likely 2016.

I posted a link above that at least TSMC is going 10nm and beyond. It just gets harder when things are this small.



You are right but I thought that Intel's 32nm SRAM chip was an anomaly as I was unable to find any reference for either 22nm or 14nm SRAM from Intel. Though looking through past IDF announcements I found the 22nm one and updated my original post. Though it does seem Intel went straight for test CPU's for 14nm back in 2013.

I'm just surprised that it does look like Intel will be first with a 10nm chip announcement when with both 22nm and 14nm nodes other companies got there first with at least SRAM test chips years before any Intel announcement while this time silence except for probably Intel.
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Re: Do 11/10nm test chips exist yet?

Postposted on Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:48 am

With the lead times it is taking to get the latest and newest chip tech out the door to the customers, you need to be well into having the next NextGen wafers coming off the lines a while before you ship the current NextGen or you will never have a chance to maintain anything even resembling the tick tock schedule that Intel shoots for.

I would bet that internally, Intel is already experimenting with 7nm tech. But we wont see such wafers before 2017 at the earliest in my opinion. I think 2018 is more likely. The timeframe on these chips getting to market is likely to be 2019, and possibly 2020. Especially since they will continue to be at least a full process cycle ahead of anyone even at that point.

Samsung and TMSC will be trying very hard to get 10nm wafers off of their production lines in the 2018-2019 time frame. 2020 is most likely the timeframe when they will have most of the kinks worked out and are finally pushing to get the majority of their production moved over to 10nm wafers.

After the Intel 7nm chips are out, the picture really gets fuzzy. Nobody knows yet if 5nm chips will work like 10nm chips. But sometime after 7nm (assuming that 7nm is going to work as intended), the manufacturing is going to seriously start butting heads with quantum physics, and we are still trying to figure out how individual atoms react on the quantum physics level for the most part. In a lab somewhere are some people that rarely see daylight who are working diligently on getting functioning 5nm wafers off of a production line. Insanity in this lab may very well be a prized attribute.

If you've ever seem a good example of fuzzy math that made you scratch your head, just wait until we get below 7nm... I think it will be somewhere in the range of about 10,000 times more complicated than 7nm will be. You are just reaching the point where every atom has to be laid down perfectly for the chips to function, and perfection on the sub-7nm nanometer scale will be incredibly difficult to accomplish with current technology. But Intel has managed to just keep pushing through the technical barriers year after year, so maybe they will have some new tricks they can pull out of the bit bucket over the next 5 years or so.
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