3D glasses

From the pixels, bits, and shaders to the graphic cards that power them. Discuss the latest from AMD and NVIDIA here.

Moderators: morphine, SecretSquirrel

3D glasses

Postposted on Wed Apr 10, 2002 8:24 pm

I just got a pair of eDimensional 3D glasses (page flip) to go with my nVidia GeForce2 MX400 64MB video card. I have them working, per se, but I'm getting a sort of a ghosting effect. I can see what I'm supposed to (the combination of the left and right channels in my brain) but I also see a faint image to the left and right as well.

I assume this is due to a timing issue with the monitor (it's a few years old, a Dell D1028L 19"). I believe the left channel is fading instead of shutting immediately off when the right channel flips on, and vice versa. Does anyone know a way to make the left and right channel flicker a little crisper which I think would get rid of my double vision?

Also, does anyone know a good site out there that could show me how best to configure them for my eyes, how far I sit from the monitor, and so on? I'm sure that all comes into play somehow, but I'm new to the third dimension in computing and so I'm not exactly sure how to go about it.

Thanks.
Fab
Gerbil
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2002 8:15 pm

Unfortunately, nothing.

Postposted on Wed Apr 10, 2002 10:37 pm

Well, sorry to say but there really isn't much you can do.

The phosphors on your monitor do not dim instanteously, so even when your right eye is blocked and you're viewing the left eye image, the previous frame for the right eye is still going to be faintly seen.

The best thing you can do is make sure you're running the maximum possible refresh rate. While it may actually not help out ghosting much if at all, it will keep your framerate as fast as possible and hopefully alleviate any headaches that are sometimes associated with the flickering.

It is possible some monitors use faster dying phosphors. That's really the only long term answer to making shutter goggles work. I don't know how you would come across such information, though. You probably can't unless some web site has actually performed a comparative test.

Last time I played with the technology the product came with a nice in-game tweaking utility. It let me tell it how strong the effect should be and asked how big my monitor was.

Sorry, but that's your dose of reality. Shutter goggles (and pretty much any 3D tech) has its limitations. Maybe some day we'll be able to pick up LCD glasses with twin independant displays or even retinal projection goggles.
Freon
Gerbil Elite
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 781
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Indiana

Postposted on Wed Apr 10, 2002 11:18 pm

Is your video driver forced to a specific refresh rate with the goggles? I played around with the original Haitek 3D glasses on the Amiga 15+ years ago, and they required that you run at exactly 60Hz refresh or else the effect was ruined. (Does anyone remember Spud Wars?)

Phosphor persistence is a statistic that is occasionally publicized by display manufacturers. You might be able to find it on the company website.
JustAnEngineer
Gerbil God
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 15322
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2002 7:00 pm
Location: The Heart of Dixie

Postposted on Wed Apr 10, 2002 11:42 pm

When I had my Elsa Revelators, it came with a utility that let you force refresh rates at every resolution, ala 3Dfx drivers. I assume all new shutter glasses have a similar utility, because running anything less than 100hz produced really horrible results. And with our wonderful Nvidia drivers that default to 60hz in EVERYTHING in 2k and XP, effectively giving you a 30hz framerate.

I'm guessing these glasses work under the same principle. I can't imagine it would require any given refresh rate. All that is important is that the images alternate and stay in sync with the shutters.
Freon
Gerbil Elite
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 781
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Indiana

Postposted on Thu Apr 11, 2002 6:27 am

I do run in decent refresh rate I think (about 120 Hz at low resolution, 85Hz at 1152 x 864). And no, I can specify a separate refresh rate for each resolution. I'm running Windows98, so I don't have the problem Freon mentioned about the nVidia drivers in 2000 or XP. And the glasses work fine in as much as I see three dimensional images, it's just that it looks as if my contacts are smeared, or I'm drunk, because of the ghosting.

Ah well, if that's that, then that's that. I was hoping there was a setting or other that would allow me to reduce the ghosting. Thanks for your help
Fab
Gerbil
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Apr 10, 2002 8:15 pm

Postposted on Fri Apr 19, 2002 3:21 pm

I own a pair of i-3d (I think) 3d glasses. Make sure that you are running the latest drivers for your video card as well as make sure that you have the latest 3d drivers for the glasses. Sometimes this helps.
Zaphod
Gerbil
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Apr 19, 2002 2:59 pm
Location: Denver, Colorado


Return to Graphics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests