Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Monopoly money comes in many flavors: 7, Vista, XP, 2K, ME, 98, etc.

Moderators: Flying Fox, Ryu Connor

Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sat May 10, 2014 3:48 am

Hi

Can someone explain to me what Hyper-V and V-Sphere means, I tried to look online however unable to find a suitable answer? :D
lazy_boy
Gerbil
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2011 5:38 am

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sat May 10, 2014 12:07 pm

They are both hypervisors - software solutions designed to emulate and manage virtual servers.

Hyper-V is the name for Microsoft's virtual machine solution. It's an enterprise product requiring VT-d (or AMD Vi) support in hardware and lets you build/run 2 virtual machines on a copy of Server2012, or unlimited virtual machines on Server2012 Datacenter Edition.

vSphere is VMWare's Linux alternative. It's their basic enterprise product and they do more advanced versions like vCenter which allow you to have multiple physical hosts connected to one hypervisor and shared SAN storage meaning you can move virtual machines from one physical host to another on the fly.

If you're looking to experiment with VM's at home, I can recommend you start with the free VMWare Player or Windows Virtual PC if you're a Windows user and just build your first virtual machine. You'll learn more by playing with it than you will by reading about it! Edit - I was just grabbing the link for Windows Virtual PC and apparently it's built into Windows8 already - as a gimped version of Hyper-V.
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 10:30 am

Chrispy_, what features is Windows 8 Hyper-V missing out on, compared to the full version?

The only one I can immediately think of is failover clustering, and I'm not sure if that's missing or just something that takes more effort than I've invested to configure. Other than that, it seems the same between my 8 laptop and my Hyper-V Server 2012 server.
Lenovo W520
IBM dx340
Nokia Lumia 928
Sony a7 with far too many lenses to list or even count
lonleyppl
Gerbil XP
 
Posts: 343
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 2:59 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 11:15 am

Chrispy_ wrote:Hyper-V is the name for Microsoft's virtual machine solution. It's an enterprise product requiring VT-d (or AMD Vi) support in hardware and lets you build/run 2 virtual machines on a copy of Server2012, or unlimited virtual machines on Server2012 Datacenter Edition.
VT-x, not VT-d. Direct I/O is optional.

lonleyppl wrote:Chrispy_, what features is Windows 8 Hyper-V missing out on, compared to the full version?

The only one I can immediately think of is failover clustering, and I'm not sure if that's missing or just something that takes more effort than I've invested to configure. Other than that, it seems the same between my 8 laptop and my Hyper-V Server 2012 server.
Nitpick: server version, not "full" version. This article lists the differences quite well.
Image
The Model M is not for the faint of heart. You either like them or hate them.

Gerbils unite! Fold for UnitedGerbilNation, team 2630.
Flying Fox
Gerbil God
 
Posts: 24290
Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 2:19 am

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 1:49 pm

FF answers you question better than I can:

1. Enterprises aren't touching Windows8, not even with a long pole - any company over a certain size has too much to lose by trying to adopt it.
2. I literally discovered Hyper-V was included with 8 as I was editing that first reply ;)
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 3:30 pm

Chrispy_ wrote:Hyper-V is the name for Microsoft's virtual machine solution. It's an enterprise product requiring VT-d (or AMD Vi) support in hardware and lets you build/run 2 virtual machines on a copy of Server2012, or unlimited virtual machines on Server2012 Datacenter Edition.


That's not how the licensing works.

MSMVP wrote:Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition expands upon these terms, providing licensing for up to four simultaneous virtual OSEs in addition to the physical OSE. You can run either Standard or Enterprise Edition in the virtual OSEs.

Enterprise Edition is most cost-effective if you want to run four simultaneous instances in a virtual OSE per processor. Enterprise Edition is licensed by server, not per processor, but more than one Enterprise Edition license may be assigned to a server to have the rights to run more than four instances of Windows Server. For example, one license for Enterprise Edition for a one-processor server running four instances of Windows Server in a virtual OSE is slightly less expensive than one Datacenter processor license. And, two licenses for Enterprise Edition for a two-processor server running eight instances of Windows Server in a virtual OSE is slightly less expensive than two processor licenses for Datacenter Edition.


https://msmvps.com/blogs/virtualreality ... ained.aspx
"Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends. We're so glad you could attend. Come inside! Come inside!"
Ryu Connor
Global Moderator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Marietta, GA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 8:42 pm

Enterprise edition doesn't exist anymore, was replaced two years ago with Datacenter. My answer was grossly oversimplified in response to a simple question.
VOSEs is how it works now, but I'm not sure that's relevant to the OP at this stage.

I'm not pretending to be a Microsoft licensing specialist, but we were audited last year by Microsoft so I had to learn this stuff.
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 10:31 pm

Flying Fox wrote:
lonleyppl wrote:Chrispy_, what features is Windows 8 Hyper-V missing out on, compared to the full version?

The only one I can immediately think of is failover clustering, and I'm not sure if that's missing or just something that takes more effort than I've invested to configure. Other than that, it seems the same between my 8 laptop and my Hyper-V Server 2012 server.
Nitpick: server version, not "full" version. This article lists the differences quite well.


Thanks! Nothing here is really unexpected, except maybe network virtualization. I have a web of virtual networks that work to connect all my VMs (all three of them!) and the outside world.

Chrispy_ wrote:FF answers you question better than I can:

1. Enterprises aren't touching Windows8, not even with a long pole - any company over a certain size has too much to lose by trying to adopt it.
2. I literally discovered Hyper-V was included with 8 as I was editing that first reply ;)


Well, we're moving to it in IT (all two of us...) just for the management tools it provides for Windows servers. RSAT is incredible, but doesn't play nicely with 7. Our users will not be getting it for a long time, as training for the UI could be a bear.
As to 2, I've found it pretty great actually. I'm a big fan of not having to update it every week (VirtualBox, I'm glaring at you).
Lenovo W520
IBM dx340
Nokia Lumia 928
Sony a7 with far too many lenses to list or even count
lonleyppl
Gerbil XP
 
Posts: 343
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 2:59 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Sun May 11, 2014 10:40 pm

All the answers before and if you're going Hyper-V you should look into getting SCVMM, Microsoft's version of a host management system. It's definitely easy to hose a host if you click the wrong thing, but it does make storage migrations a snap. We're on WS2K8R2 where licensing is pretty much unlimited number of guests. I hear that's changed for WS2012R2.

Have fun!
Calm seas never made a skilled mariner.
drsauced
Graphmaster Gerbil
 
Posts: 1463
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2003 1:38 pm
Location: Here!

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Tue May 13, 2014 12:36 am

This is the way the licensing works for the various editions that include Hyper-V:

Hyper-V Server 2008/2008 R2/2012/2012 R2 is a stand alone product and does not include any licensing for running VMs. It is a free product, but you must purchase licenses for any VMs running on it. Starting with 2012 they included support for using it in a clustered environment (this may have actually started with 2008 R2).

Windows Server 2008/2008 R2/2012/2012 R2 Standard includes licensing for two VMs included with the host license. You can purchase additional licenses for additional VMs.

Windows Server 2008/2008 R2 Enterprise (there is no Enterprise version of 2012 or 2012 R2) includes licensing for four VMs included with the host license. You can purchase additional licenses for additional VMs. Enterprise also includes support for Windows Clustering.

Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2 / 2012 / 2012 R2 Datacenter includes licensing for an unlimited number of VMs with the host license. There is no requirement to purchase additional licensing for any host Windows Server based VM, no matter the edition. Datacenter also includes support for Windows Clustering.

With Server 2012/2012 R2 Standard, it's a 2:1 relationship of VMs to licenses required (you can run two additional VMs per one license purchased). The example given in the Licensing Datasheet is that if you have a 2-processor server with 12 VMs, you would need six Standard licenses (or one Datacenter license). Obviously there is a point of diminishing returns where you might as well just purchase Datacenter. List price on Standard is $822, so six licenses would be $5,292. List price on Datacenter is $6,155. You exceed that at 14 VMs...and yes, I do have servers running that many, and more, VMs (dual hexa-core, 384GB RAM, six 10GigE links, two GigE links). With virtualization we don't double up duties on any server...so a DHCP server is just a DHCP server, a print server is just a print server, etc. Some might call that VM sprawl, but it makes us more flexible in what we can support, and maintenance of one service doesn't affect another service.

Be aware that with Windows 2008 and 2008 R2 there are other differences between the Standard, Enterprise, and Datacenter editions. For instance, there are additional certificate types when running a Certificate Authority on 2008/2008R2. Datacenter also had other optimizations for HPC environments and large databases. Starting with Server 2012 there is literally no difference between Standard and Datacenter except for the number of VMs that you can run without additional licensing.

I should also note that I work in Higher Education so our licensing costs are no where near list price. :)


EDIT: Changed "Windows Hyper-V Server" to the correct name of "Hyper-V Server"
curtisb
Gerbil
 
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 11:27 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Tue May 13, 2014 3:30 pm

Chrispy_ wrote:vSphere is VMWare's Linux alternative. It's their basic enterprise product and they do more advanced versions like vCenter which allow you to have multiple physical hosts connected to one hypervisor and shared SAN storage meaning you can move virtual machines from one physical host to another on the fly.

Nitpick: vSphere (ESXi) is not based on Linux. It's a true native bare-metal hypervisor. It includes a "Linux-like" busybox shell for administrative functions, but the kernel is not Linux based. FYI...
Buub
Maximum Gerbil
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 4192
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2002 11:59 pm
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Buub - I know you're trying to be clear, but I think it should be noted that while the current ESXi does not in any way contain or travel with Linux, ESX still somewhat does, while not being Linux, it certainly associates rather closely with it, and this was even less clear and even more interconnected in the past.

So yes, you're right. But it bears noting that it's complicated, too.
I've been here long enough that I think I can forgo a signature.
Forge
Darth Gerbil
 
Posts: 7959
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: SouthEast PA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Wed May 14, 2014 6:05 am

You guys are all taking this out of context.

Look at the OP's question and stop getting massively geeky and overly pedantic. Stop trying to prove that you know more than the next guy and apply some common sense. If we carry on down this road we might as well just list a 400-strong collection of Microsoft and VMware whitepapers....
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Wed May 14, 2014 7:40 am

Chrispy_ wrote:You guys are all taking this out of context.

Look at the OP's question and stop getting massively geeky and overly pedantic. Stop trying to prove that you know more than the next guy and apply some common sense. If we carry on down this road we might as well just list a 400-strong collection of Microsoft and VMware whitepapers....

It is probably worth asking at this point:

@OP - Do you understand what virtualization is? If we know what your current level of knowledge is we can better tailor the answers/links to fill in the holes in your understanding.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 37514
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Wed May 14, 2014 9:58 am

Chrispy_ wrote:They are both hypervisors - software solutions designed to emulate and manage virtual servers.

vSphere is VMWare's Linux alternative. It's their basic enterprise product and they do more advanced versions like vCenter which allow you to have multiple physical hosts connected to one hypervisor and shared SAN storage meaning you can move virtual machines from one physical host to another on the fly.
.[/i]


IIRC, doesn't the VMWare used in the Nexsus series from Cisco allow you to have multiple Virtual supervisors running to manage a greater number of VM Hosts?

Could be wrong, since I'm just studying it, but I wanna say from memory that the number of VMs and Supervisors are limited only by the hardware in the Nexus 1000/1002.
Hz so good
Gerbil XP
 
Posts: 466
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2013 5:08 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Tue May 20, 2014 8:43 pm

Chrispy_ wrote:You guys are all taking this out of context.

Look at the OP's question and stop getting massively geeky and overly pedantic. Stop trying to prove that you know more than the next guy and apply some common sense. If we carry on down this road we might as well just list a 400-strong collection of Microsoft and VMware whitepapers....


This from the dude who pedanted mightily about Enterprise Edition no longer existing? This is TR, OP hit and ran, and may never return. At this point, tradition tells us we're talking to ourselves, so why rain on someone's parade and act as Relevance Police? We're all on the original topic, or closely related.
I've been here long enough that I think I can forgo a signature.
Forge
Darth Gerbil
 
Posts: 7959
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: SouthEast PA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 10:35 am

Forge wrote:This from the dude who pedanted mightily about Enterprise Edition no longer existing?


I wouldn't call it pedanting mightily; Ryu challenged my response with incorrect (outdated) info. Am I not allowed to defend my responses in the forums anymore? :-?

Since the OP is gone, what is the difference between VT-d and VT-i, anyway? All I am aware of is that Hyper-V won't install on a Xeon if Vt-D is disabled. I have no idea what benefits they bring because I don't get the choice to not use it.
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 10:54 am

VT-d allows hardware devices to be natively passed through to a guest OS, without going through an emulation layer on the host OS. This is useful in situations where you want native levels of performance, or when the host OS does not have appropriate drivers for the device.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 37514
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 11:01 am

Chrispy_ wrote:Since the OP is gone, what is the difference between VT-d and VT-i, anyway? All I am aware of is that Hyper-V won't install on a Xeon if Vt-D is disabled. I have no idea what benefits they bring because I don't get the choice to not use it.


VT-x or VT = generic name for Intel's virtualization and paravirtualization extensions.
VT-i = VT for Itanium. Never used this, no Itaniums in my Real World.
VT-d = VT plus IOMMU, means you can virtualize hardware access, manage and control the PCI memory space. You can then pass-through any given device to a VM, for full native control. Unfortunately most consumer graphics cards do not yet play nicely with this.
VT-c = VT for Connectivity, some sort of networking abstraction that Intel is working on. I don't have any of this stuff yet.
GVT; specifically GVT-d, GVT-s and GVT-g = Intel's new virtualization and paravirtualization for on-die graphics. There are three modes, GVT-d assigns the iGPU directly to a single VM and requires secondary graphics support. GVT-g lets multiple VMs run the native graphics driver, with the GPU being shared round-robin. I believe it saves/loads state for each VM separately. You can now have the Intel graphics driver crash the hardware in one VM only! GVT-s is similar to GVT-g, but instead of running the normal native graphics driver, it uses a paravirtualization method with a driver shim.

Did you mean AMD-Vi instead of VT-i? AMD-Vi is very similar to VT-d, basically the same thing, competing brand.

Hyper-V probably wouldn't enable on your Xeon machine because disabling VT-d may have also disabled VT/VT-x.
I've been here long enough that I think I can forgo a signature.
Forge
Darth Gerbil
 
Posts: 7959
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: SouthEast PA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 11:15 am

My mistake, I meant VT-x instead of VT-i, I'd never come across it before.
Didn't realise the x could be algebraic and not part of the acronym - i.e. VT-<any value is good> :oops:
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 12:10 pm

Forge wrote:Hyper-V probably wouldn't enable on your Xeon machine because disabling VT-d may have also disabled VT/VT-x.

Confirming this point. Please double check if you are disabling VT-x instead because I have done plenty of Hyper-V installs without VT-d.
Image
The Model M is not for the faint of heart. You either like them or hate them.

Gerbils unite! Fold for UnitedGerbilNation, team 2630.
Flying Fox
Gerbil God
 
Posts: 24290
Joined: Mon May 24, 2004 2:19 am

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 1:14 pm

Only slightly related, but I ran across this the other day:

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/For ... server8gen

Basically, on 2012 Hyper-V can break if you're not using CPUs of the same stepping/revision. I found this oddly enough looking at why the HP BIOS wouldn't give an option to disable half the CPU cores on one server but not the other. Came down to the Xeon revision was different between the server as the possible cause. But I found the Hyper-V bit interesting especially since it worked for people in 2008 with mismatched steppings/revisions.
Scrotos
Graphmaster Gerbil
 
Posts: 1028
Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2007 12:57 pm
Location: Denver, CO.

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 1:26 pm

Chrispy_ wrote:My mistake, I meant VT-x instead of VT-i, I'd never come across it before.
Didn't realise the x could be algebraic and not part of the acronym - i.e. VT-<any value is good> :oops:
x is frequently algebraic. It is in x86 (where x stands for 80, 802, 803, 804, etc), it is (or was) in DirectX (where x stood for 3D, Sound, Show, Play, etc).
But x86 aside (which is more historical at this point and has become a brand) Intel -- in their slides at least -- tends to use * as a placeholder for variations of a tech (VT-*)
UberGerbil
Gerbil Khan
 
Posts: 9973
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 1:26 pm

If you own Windows 8 "Pro", then you get free access to the Hyper-V client and can use it like VMware Workstation or VirtualBox. Including access to Gen 2 VMs.

As for Windows Server 2012 R2 DataCenter Edition, this version specifically allows an unlimited number of virtual machines in HyperV. Also if the Guest OS's are using WS 2012 or newer then keys are not required other than a static AVMA key. All WS 2012 R2 guest VM's that are powered on will check that the host system is a validated DC Edition, and if so will auto-validate without needing to call to an MS server or deal with activation hassles. This is why the Datacenter edition has such a high upfront cost, the only difference is visualization rights. It actually uses the same install media as Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard but with a DC edition key as the only difference. AVMA info & keys at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn303421.aspx

College students with access to DreamSpark can play around with Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Edition for free. 8)
Kougar
Gerbil Team Leader
 
Posts: 245
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:12 am
Location: Texas

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 4:22 pm

Hz so good wrote:IIRC, doesn't the VMWare used in the Nexsus series from Cisco allow you to have multiple Virtual supervisors running to manage a greater number of VM Hosts?

Could be wrong, since I'm just studying it, but I wanna say from memory that the number of VMs and Supervisors are limited only by the hardware in the Nexus 1000/1002.


Not to be rude, but what are you talking about?

The Nexus series of switches runs NX OS and the Nexus 1000v is a vApp that extends the reach of the network team down into vSphere so the typical systems/network engineer paradigm can persist in a virtual world.

VM density is limited by the underlying host hardware and the footprint of your services and applications as well as your performance and HA requirements.
Beelzebubba9
Gerbil
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2004 10:23 am
Location: New York, NY

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Thu May 22, 2014 4:49 pm

Chrispy_ wrote:I wouldn't call it pedanting mightily; Ryu challenged my response with incorrect (outdated) info. Am I not allowed to defend my responses in the forums anymore? :-?


It was mightily pedantic. My post was all 100% factually correct. You didn't even need to defend, as it wasn't a challenge, and your response wasn't a defense but really a missing of the point. Missing the point really highlights the pedantry.

The fact that Enterprise Edition 2012 doesn't exist didn't even matter to the information I posted. It was an example of how the licensing works. It was not meant to be a recommendation on buying Enterprise Edition or even a comparison between 2012 and 2008. I used 2008 because it has the same fundamental licensing scheme.

I'll be more pedantically clear next time.
"Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends. We're so glad you could attend. Come inside! Come inside!"
Ryu Connor
Global Moderator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Marietta, GA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Tue May 27, 2014 5:51 pm

Ryu Connor wrote:My post was all 100% factually correct.


This is where the problem lies then. My post was correct and your statement "That's not how the licensing works" is not.

The MSMVP quote for your reasoning is out of date - licensing does not work that way anymore and when you come to renew any 2008 product licenses, Microsoft will re-license you based on their current 2014 icensing structure. Enterprise Edition vanished with the licensing changes of 2012. Some EE features of S2008 were added to the Standard Edition, whilst others were rolled into Datacenter.

Maybe we have our wires crossed, in which case this is all irrelevant, but the way I see it is that you are contradicting me and accusing me of pedantry for calling you out on a (presumably) genuine mistake! The fact you directly quoted *me* and claimed my information was wrong seems like a good enough, non-pedantic reason for me to respond. My information is correct to the best of my knowledge - I was given it directly by Microsoft and Curtisb's post seems to confirm that I'm not talking out of my ass with the 2:1 VM licenses per S2012 license. I know it's not quite that simple but it's the end result in most cases and good enough for the complexity of my response to the OP.

Am I being unreasonable? Put yourself in my shoes;
  • I post a simplified response to the OP that covers the most basic description of licensing
  • You quote me as incorrect according to your obsolete information
  • I disagree with you and explain that your information is now both obsolete and incorrect.
  • You accuse me of being pedantic.
  • Image
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Tue May 27, 2014 6:44 pm

Chrispy_ wrote:Maybe we have our wires crossed, in which case this is all irrelevant


Yes, you're reading, but still not hearing what I'm saying.
"Welcome back my friends to the show that never ends. We're so glad you could attend. Come inside! Come inside!"
Ryu Connor
Global Moderator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2001 7:00 pm
Location: Marietta, GA

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Wed May 28, 2014 12:58 am

Beelzebubba9 wrote:
Hz so good wrote:IIRC, doesn't the VMWare used in the Nexsus series from Cisco allow you to have multiple Virtual supervisors running to manage a greater number of VM Hosts?

Could be wrong, since I'm just studying it, but I wanna say from memory that the number of VMs and Supervisors are limited only by the hardware in the Nexus 1000/1002.


Not to be rude, but what are you talking about?

The Nexus series of switches runs NX OS and the Nexus 1000v is a vApp that extends the reach of the network team down into vSphere so the typical systems/network engineer paradigm can persist in a virtual world.

VM density is limited by the underlying host hardware and the footprint of your services and applications as well as your performance and HA requirements.



Like I said, I'm just starting to study this, so it's entirely possible I'm way off base here, but excluding the 1000v software switch for VMware and Hyper-V, I was under the impression that the 1000 hardware models could also run virtual supervisors. I thought the rest of the Nexus line were the ones running NX-OS. All I can say for sure that the cisco course said the 1000 HW switches were used to control the 2000 fabric extenders, the 3000 were ~50ns latency merchant boxes, 4000 were IBM blade servers, and bigger ones I'm blanking on. The simulator I have is incredibly limited to a few functions of the 7000 model (I think). It's as frustating as not having a Cat6500 switch to practice private-vlans, since CAT3550s don't support it.

Please, feel free to point out where I'm wrong. I won't learn, unless I have my mistakes pointed out, you know? :)
And I'm always going to be learning, in this field.
Hz so good
Gerbil XP
 
Posts: 466
Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2013 5:08 pm

Re: Hyper-V and V-Sphere Client

Postposted on Wed May 28, 2014 5:34 am

So please help me understand where I'm misinterpreting you:

Ryu Connor wrote:
Chrispy_ wrote:Hyper-V is the name for Microsoft's virtual machine solution. It's an enterprise product requiring VT-d (or AMD Vi) support in hardware and lets you build/run 2 virtual machines on a copy of Server2012, or unlimited virtual machines on Server2012 Datacenter Edition.

That's not how the licensing works.

No, that *is* how the licensing works.

I don't like being accused of being pedantic when you're the one who's wrong whilst inferring that the fault is mine.
<insert large, flashing, epileptic-fit-inducing signature (based on the latest internet-meme) here>
Chrispy_
Gerbil Jedi
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1777
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 3:49 pm

Next

Return to Windows

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 7 guests