Goodbye IPv4

The network is the forum.

Moderators: Steel, notfred

Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:43 am

IANA just allocated the last 2 free /8s to APNIC, triggering the remaining 5 /8s going to each of the RIRs as previously agreed.
http://www.apnic.net/publications/news/2011/delegation

So it's time to upgrade to IPv6 otherwise it will be The Day the Routers Died
notfred
Grand Gerbil Poohbah
 
Posts: 3775
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:10 am
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:57 am

Great video notfred. Put a smile on my face this snowy morning.

On another thought though, countries (and organizations) throughout the world need to stop waiting for the last minute to do things that are inevitable. We knew in the 90's the explosive force of the internet, and that IP addresses would be used up in 15-20 years. What would have been a much easier change back then is now going to be a much harder, costlier and longer process than it needed to be.

I know now I am just ranting but the same thing is going to happen with oil whenever that runs out. I understand that markets drive the cost and development but at the same time I think people need to step back and look at the bigger picture once and a while, and not wait till it's to late and then half ass a solution.

Sorry for my morning rant.
To Start Press Any Key'. Where's the ANY key?
If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing
You know, boys, a nuclear reactor is a lot like a woman. You just have to read the manual and press the right buttons.
mmmmmdonuts21
Gerbil Elite
 
Posts: 591
Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:09 am

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:12 am

mmmmmdonuts21 wrote:Great video notfred. Put a smile on my face this snowy morning.

On another thought though, countries (and organizations) throughout the world need to stop waiting for the last minute to do things that are inevitable. We knew in the 90's the explosive force of the internet, and that IP addresses would be used up in 15-20 years. What would have been a much easier change back then is now going to be a much harder, costlier and longer process than it needed to be.

I know now I am just ranting but the same thing is going to happen with oil whenever that runs out. I understand that markets drive the cost and development but at the same time I think people need to step back and look at the bigger picture once and a while, and not wait till it's to late and then half ass a solution.

Sorry for my morning rant.


Well, any solution to this would border on (or outright be) religious, and therefore belong in a different forum :).
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
Canon EOS-M|11-22/4-5.6 IS STM|22/2 STM|EF-M 18-55/3.5-5.6 IS STM|
Airmantharp
Gerbil Elder
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 5130
Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:41 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:15 am

mmmmmdonuts21 wrote:On another thought though, countries (and organizations) throughout the world need to stop waiting for the last minute to do things that are inevitable. We knew... What would have been a much easier change back then is now going to be a much harder, costlier and longer process than it needed to be... the same thing is going to happen... I think people need to step back and look at the bigger picture once and a while, and not wait till it's to late and then half ass a solution.
I believe that you've described how the majority of businesses and organizations are run. The people in charge are in it for short term gain. They'll let someone else worry about the long-term mess that they leave behind.
JustAnEngineer
Gerbil God
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 15593
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2002 7:00 pm
Location: The Heart of Dixie

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:20 am

A lot (maybe most?) of ISPs' infrastructure isn't even IPv6 ready. There's a serious chicken-and-egg issue here, where nobody is feeling pressured to upgrade their equipment because everything else is still IPv4.

Combine that with a down economy (where nobody is willing to invest in new infrastructure) and you end up where we are today.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:25 am

Of the big ISPs in North America, I'm only aware of Comcast rolling out IPv6 http://www.comcast6.net/ The story is different elsewhere in the world, I suspect APNIC has more usage than elsewhere.
notfred
Grand Gerbil Poohbah
 
Posts: 3775
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:10 am
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:31 am

Is there any real remaining reason why the Multicast blocks (224/8 - 239/8) and Future Use blocks (240/8 - 255/8) can't be put back into the pool?
Life is hard; but it's harder if you're stupid. Big Al.
Captain Ned
Global Moderator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 20639
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2002 7:00 pm
Location: Vermont, USA

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:55 am

Captain Ned wrote:Is there any real remaining reason why the Multicast blocks (224/8 - 239/8) and Future Use blocks (240/8 - 255/8) can't be put back into the pool?

Wouldn't that hose anyone who actually uses multicast?
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:58 am

Captain Ned wrote:Is there any real remaining reason why the Multicast blocks (224/8 - 239/8) and Future Use blocks (240/8 - 255/8) can't be put back into the pool?

I believe it was Ars that had a good write up on why, but what it basically came down to was the fact that all software expects those blocks to be unused, and throws exceptions if they are. If you're going to spend the time developing code that correctly accepts the blocks, why not just fix up the code to use IPv6 instead.
Intel i7 860, Asus P7P55D Pro, 4x2GB Corsair XMS3 1600 (CMX4GX3M2A1600C9), EVGA GTX 560 Ti Superclocked
Seagate 7200.7 160GB, WD Caviar Black 640GB, WD Caviar Green 1TB, WD Caviar Green 2TB
Dell 2408WFP and Dell 2407WFP-HC for dual-24" goodness
emorgoch
Gerbil Elite
 
Posts: 690
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:26 am
Location: Toronto, ON

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 10:06 am

Multicast is actually used in most of the IPTV stuff. And as emorgoch says, if you are going to change the code why not change it to IPv6 anyway? The Future use block is only 15 /8s anyway and IANA was allocating a /8 every 4-6 weeks so that wouldn't give you much room anyway.
notfred
Grand Gerbil Poohbah
 
Posts: 3775
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:10 am
Location: Ottawa, Canada

What will it take?

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 10:16 am

What will it take to transistion to IPv6?

As a serviceman working in communications, I know that literally every peice of equipment we employ (emphasis on we, my unit) is IPv6 capable. So, as a novice to real internet infrastructure, can anyone share a quick explanation as to what it will take to flip the switch?
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
Canon EOS-M|11-22/4-5.6 IS STM|22/2 STM|EF-M 18-55/3.5-5.6 IS STM|
Airmantharp
Gerbil Elder
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 5130
Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:41 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:01 pm

First of all the ISP needs to get IPv6 space allocated just like it has IPv4 space allocated. Then the ISP needs to sort out IPv6 peering (are all of its peers IPv6 capable, does it need to negotiate new agreements to allow for IPv6 etc). Then there is nothing technically to stop it running clients on dual-stack IPv6/IPv4 although they probably want to get their address assignment and billing sorted out to deal with IPv6 (to stop people doing tons of data over v6 and not getting billed for it).

After that they can begin the slow process of migrating their systems (mail, web etc) over to be dual-stack and hence accessible from IPv6 only hosts. Probably the biggest amount of work is making sure that all the backend management, logging etc systems can cope with IPv6 addresses.
notfred
Grand Gerbil Poohbah
 
Posts: 3775
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:10 am
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: What will it take?

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:04 pm

Airmantharp wrote:As a serviceman working in communications, I know that literally every peice of equipment we employ (emphasis on we, my unit) is IPv6 capable. So, as a novice to real internet infrastructure, can anyone share a quick explanation as to what it will take to flip the switch?
The summary at Ars from last year is probably the best "quick" explanation. They have some older articles that offer more background if you search.
UberGerbil
Gerbil Khan
 
Posts: 9999
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:32 pm

I don't see the reason why the networking crowd should be panicking. The major backbones and hubs of the internet will be upgraded long before there will be "actual" problems.
Ivy Bridge i5-3570K@4.0Ghz, Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H, 2x4GiB of PC-12800, EVGA 660Ti, Corsair CX-600 and Fractal Refined R4 (W). Kentsfield Q6600@3Ghz, HD 4850 2x2GiB PC2-6400, Gigabyte EP45-DS4P, OCZ Modstream 700W, and PC-7B.
Krogoth
Maximum Gerbil
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 4475
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2003 3:20 pm
Location: somewhere on Core Prime

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 2:54 pm

Krogoth wrote:I don't see the reason why the networking crowd should be panicking. The major backbones and hubs of the internet will be upgraded long before there will be "actual" problems.

But until the client systems (i.e. the broadband routers in people's homes) are upgraded as well you can't utilize the additional IPv6 address space effectively, because any IPv6-only sites will be inaccessible to a large percentage of Internet users.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:03 pm

Krogoth wrote:I don't see the reason why the networking crowd should be panicking. The major backbones and hubs of the internet will be upgraded long before there will be "actual" problems.
Well that's been the attitude for the past 15 years. We've just reached a major milestone along that path and as I pointed out earlier I'm only aware of one major ISP in North America that supports IPv6. Roll out of IPv6 takes time, how long do we have to wait before we start seeing those upgrades?
notfred
Grand Gerbil Poohbah
 
Posts: 3775
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:10 am
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:14 pm

notfred wrote:
Krogoth wrote:I don't see the reason why the networking crowd should be panicking. The major backbones and hubs of the internet will be upgraded long before there will be "actual" problems.
Well that's been the attitude for the past 15 years. We've just reached a major milestone along that path and as I pointed out earlier I'm only aware of one major ISP in North America that supports IPv6. Roll out of IPv6 takes time, how long do we have to wait before we start seeing those upgrades?



When there is enough demand for it to justify the infrastructure costs. Read: it doesn't exist yet. Cisco and other networking equipment companies are foaming their mouths with the opportunity that comes with the big upgrade. ;)

just brew it! wrote:
Krogoth wrote:I don't see the reason why the networking crowd should be panicking. The major backbones and hubs of the internet will be upgraded long before there will be "actual" problems.

But until the client systems (i.e. the broadband routers in people's homes) are upgraded as well you can't utilize the additional IPv6 address space effectively, because any IPv6-only sites will be inaccessible to a large percentage of Internet users.


The problem is mostly software for client systems. A simple firmware update on most customer-grade routers will do the trick. The real problem is getting average joe to upgrade. ISP will have to launch some of upgrade campaign akin to digital TV movement. It helps that the majority of current OS and NICs have IPv6 support.
Ivy Bridge i5-3570K@4.0Ghz, Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H, 2x4GiB of PC-12800, EVGA 660Ti, Corsair CX-600 and Fractal Refined R4 (W). Kentsfield Q6600@3Ghz, HD 4850 2x2GiB PC2-6400, Gigabyte EP45-DS4P, OCZ Modstream 700W, and PC-7B.
Krogoth
Maximum Gerbil
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 4475
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2003 3:20 pm
Location: somewhere on Core Prime

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:22 pm

Krogoth wrote:The problem is mostly software for client systems. A simple firmware update on most customer-grade routers will do the trick. The real problem is getting average joe to upgrade. ISP will have to launch some of upgrade campaign akin to digital TV movement. It helps that the majority of current OS and NICs have IPv6 support.

You really think that Linksys/Netgear/etc. are going to issue firmware updates for all of their old routers? Netgear hasn't touched the horribly buggy firmware in my router since 2005. If they're not even going to fix blatant bugs, I'd say the odds of an IPv6 firmware upgrade are within epsilon of zero, for any router that isn't in current (or at least recent) production.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:58 pm

This is a pretty interesting take on IPv6 -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30CnqRK0GHE

*Part 1 is just as informative/interesting. This goes into a bit of how BitTorrent users might be affected... :o
CoWBoY
Gerbil In Training
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 15, 2005 5:33 pm
Location: Houston. TX

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:04 pm

just brew it! wrote:
Krogoth wrote:The problem is mostly software for client systems. A simple firmware update on most customer-grade routers will do the trick. The real problem is getting average joe to upgrade. ISP will have to launch some of upgrade campaign akin to digital TV movement. It helps that the majority of current OS and NICs have IPv6 support.

You really think that Linksys/Netgear/etc. are going to issue firmware updates for all of their old routers? Netgear hasn't touched the horribly buggy firmware in my router since 2005. If they're not even going to fix blatant bugs, I'd say the odds of an IPv6 firmware upgrade are within epsilon of zero, for any router that isn't in current (or at least recent) production.


If they get enough customer complaints on "Why my internets is broken?", they might do something. ;)

Honestly, there's no real reason to get new hardware when the old stuff is perfectly capable of it.
Ivy Bridge i5-3570K@4.0Ghz, Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H, 2x4GiB of PC-12800, EVGA 660Ti, Corsair CX-600 and Fractal Refined R4 (W). Kentsfield Q6600@3Ghz, HD 4850 2x2GiB PC2-6400, Gigabyte EP45-DS4P, OCZ Modstream 700W, and PC-7B.
Krogoth
Maximum Gerbil
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 4475
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2003 3:20 pm
Location: somewhere on Core Prime

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:06 pm

just brew it! wrote:
Krogoth wrote:The problem is mostly software for client systems. A simple firmware update on most customer-grade routers will do the trick. The real problem is getting average joe to upgrade. ISP will have to launch some of upgrade campaign akin to digital TV movement. It helps that the majority of current OS and NICs have IPv6 support.
You really think that Linksys/Netgear/etc. are going to issue firmware updates for all of their old routers? Netgear hasn't touched the horribly buggy firmware in my router since 2005. If they're not even going to fix blatant bugs, I'd say the odds of an IPv6 firmware upgrade are within epsilon of zero, for any router that isn't in current (or at least recent) production.
In fact, they have a huge economic incentive not to do this. When consumers (eventually) start discovering that there's "more internet" out there that's inaccessible to them except via IPv6, their router mfr has every reason to say "Yes indeed, and we'll be happy to sell you a new router that lets you get there!" After all, you don't get a free upgrade to your CPU when new ones appear, and 802.11b/g users didn't get a free update to n, etc. It doesn't matter that a firmware upgrade is all that's required; they have no obligation to provide one. And short of such an obligation being created (ie, government regulation and mandates, à la digital TV) they won't. cha-ching

But it's going to be a long time before that "more" IPv6-only internet exists, because who wants to have a site or service there, where it's currently unreachable by the vast majority of potential eyeballs or customers? Sure, you might want an IPv6 address for the future, but you want an IPv4 address for the present... and that present never ends. Meanwhile, the folks who hand out the IPv4 addresses have to figure out how to ration their finite (and in some cases exhausted) supply. I suspect we'll see all sorts of NAT-ish things going on where the Telcos/Cablecos end up giving their customers "fake" IPv4 addresses so that they can provide actual IPv4 IPs to their business customers (most already charge extra for a static IP; charging extra for even a dynamic but real IPv4 IP is the next step). Of course, that NAT stuff will generally break all sorts of things from games to torrents -- but hey, you want that to work? Well, then pay extra. You can still surf the web, after all. You want to any of that fancy-schmancy "advanced" stuff? cha-ching (And in fact, since many of the big ISPs like Comcast are also in the content-distribution business, they may not even offer that at any price. Sorry your torrents don't work, but we'll happily sell you video-on-demand)

In fact that might be the only thing that will push end users into IPv6, if it allowed them to go around some of that pain. It would be nice if the ISPs incentivized that transition by not also charging extra to do any of that via IPv6, but I seriously doubt they'll be able to resist.
UberGerbil
Gerbil Khan
 
Posts: 9999
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:11 pm

Krogoth wrote:If they get enough customer complaints on "Why my internets is broken?", they might do something. ;)
The ISPs get those complaints, not the router mfrs (after all, in this case the internet isn't broken, just incomplete). And the easiest answer the ISPs can give is "your router is out of date, get a new one." They might suggest a firmware upgrade, but again, there's no reason for Cisco to develop a firmware upgrade for a 10-year-old LinkSys router when they can just tell you "Sorry, but did you know for very little money you can get a new router that's even better?"
Honestly, there's no real reason to get new hardware when the old stuff is perfectly capable of it.
No, but unless you have a router with 3rd party firmware, there's no guarantee you'll be able to make your old hardware do it, regardless of what it might be capable of.
UberGerbil
Gerbil Khan
 
Posts: 9999
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:18 pm

Krogoth wrote:
just brew it! wrote:You really think that Linksys/Netgear/etc. are going to issue firmware updates for all of their old routers? Netgear hasn't touched the horribly buggy firmware in my router since 2005. If they're not even going to fix blatant bugs, I'd say the odds of an IPv6 firmware upgrade are within epsilon of zero, for any router that isn't in current (or at least recent) production.

If they get enough customer complaints on "Why my internets is broken?", they might do something. ;)

How much you wanna bet they just tell their customers to buy a new router? Win-win for them -- they don't need to develop the firmware update, and they get to sell more hardware!

Honestly, there's no real reason to get new hardware when the old stuff is perfectly capable of it.

It isn't "capable of it" (in any practical sense) if the firmware doesn't exist. Even if there's 3rd party firmware available, the average end user isn't going to know how to find or install it.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Tue Feb 01, 2011 10:17 pm

Looks like Comcast is at least starting to move on IPv6: http://blog.comcast.com/2011/01/comcast ... ocsis.html
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Wed Feb 02, 2011 7:51 am

JBI wrote:How much you wanna bet they just tell their customers to buy a new router? Win-win for them -- they don't need to develop the firmware update, and they get to sell more hardware!


Seriously! This is a ready-made marketing campaign, I can already envision what the "Supports IPv6!" sticker graphic will look like...

The notion that they're going to upgrade all the out gateways out there is nothing short of delusional. That's throwing money away.
Glorious
Darth Gerbil
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 7886
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2002 6:35 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:15 am

Glorious wrote:
JBI wrote:How much you wanna bet they just tell their customers to buy a new router? Win-win for them -- they don't need to develop the firmware update, and they get to sell more hardware!


Seriously! This is a ready-made marketing campaign, I can already envision what the "Supports IPv6!" sticker graphic will look like...

The notion that they're going to upgrade all the out gateways out there is nothing short of delusional. That's throwing money away.


/notapersonalattack

Glorious, it's posts like these that make me think you actually are a raving lunatic. Of course, then I perform a self-analheadectomy and realize that you're right, and that the easy/right/good answer is not the logical one, and I am made sad.

I can't imagine a peice of consumer networking equipment manufactured in the last two or three years that doesn't already support IPv6; it's hard to imagine other companies, such as ISPs, providing incapable or unupgradable equipment to their herds, at least in the case of people who rent their equipment. Backbone equipment, on the other hand, I have no concept of :).
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
Canon EOS-M|11-22/4-5.6 IS STM|22/2 STM|EF-M 18-55/3.5-5.6 IS STM|
Airmantharp
Gerbil Elder
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 5130
Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2004 10:41 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Wed Feb 02, 2011 1:35 pm

Airmantharp wrote:I can't imagine a peice of consumer networking equipment manufactured in the last two or three years that doesn't already support IPv6; it's hard to imagine other companies, such as ISPs, providing incapable or unupgradable equipment to their herds, at least in the case of people who rent their equipment. Backbone equipment, on the other hand, I have no concept of :).
Just because you can't imagine it....

From what I can tell, there's a lot of consumer DSL equipment still going out the door today without IPv6 support. The popular Netgear DG834 series still doesn't support it, despite being on its 4th revision. And I think that's the situation with consumer modems from most DSL providers. Just looking at QWest (my local telco) for example, I don't think any of the DSL modems they currently offer support IPv6. In fact, you'd be hard-pressed to find any mention of IPv6 anywhere on the consumer side of Qwest; they have this press release
QWest wrote:To stay ahead of the Internet’s explosive growth, Qwest Communications (NYSE: Q) today announced it is offering public and private Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) addresses to its government and business customers.
That's from July 2010, seven months ago -- yes, you're certainly staying ahead of the internet, QWest! That press release also goes on to mention the government Networx program, which makes me suspect there was actually a requirement to support IPv6 in the later stages of those contracts (the largest civilian government telecoms contracts in the US, which QWest got a piece of) and that was the only reason QWest got even that much on the ball.

I know less about the cable side of things, though it seems to be in somewhat better shape; certainly, the DOCSIS 3.0 devices I've looked at seem to have IPv6 support. But they are by no means the only devices out there, and I suspect at least some of the cable operators were still offering boxes without IPv6 support until fairly recently (and in some cases maybe still are).
UberGerbil
Gerbil Khan
 
Posts: 9999
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Wed Feb 02, 2011 1:45 pm

Airmantharp wrote:Glorious, it's posts like these that make me think you actually are a raving lunatic.


No worries man, I'm honestly and seriously not sure about that myself.

Absolutely no offense taken.
Glorious
Darth Gerbil
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 7886
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2002 6:35 pm

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Wed Feb 02, 2011 2:02 pm

Glorious wrote:
JBI wrote:How much you wanna bet they just tell their customers to buy a new router? Win-win for them -- they don't need to develop the firmware update, and they get to sell more hardware!

Seriously! This is a ready-made marketing campaign, I can already envision what the "Supports IPv6!" sticker graphic will look like..

Hey, at least it will be more meaningful than all the "Windows Vista Ready" stickers that showed up on monitors, keyboards, etc. a few years ago.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 38096
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Goodbye IPv4

Postposted on Wed Feb 02, 2011 2:49 pm

You can test your IPv6 connectivity here (or just try reaching http://ipv6.google.com).
notfred wrote:Of the big ISPs in North America, I'm only aware of Comcast rolling out IPv6 http://www.comcast6.net/ The story is different elsewhere in the world, I suspect APNIC has more usage than elsewhere.
I just noticed Ars had a story on this. Also, "World IPv6 Day" coming in June.
UberGerbil
Gerbil Khan
 
Posts: 9999
Joined: Thu Jun 19, 2003 3:11 pm

Next

Return to Networking

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests