The future of hard drives?

Don't see a specific place for your hardware question? This is the forum for you!

Moderators: mac_h8r1, Nemesis

The future of hard drives?

Postposted on Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:01 am

http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-02-phy ... rough.html

the article wrote:This revolutionary method allows the recording of Terabytes (thousands of Gigabytes) of information per second, hundreds of times faster than present hard drive technology.


If it ever becomes publicly available, any guesses as to the cost of one of these? 8)
Corsair 600T | ASUS P8P67 PRO | Intel 2500k @ 4.4Ghz | EVGA 560 TI | G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB | Corsair HX650 650W
steelcity_ballin
Gerbilus Supremus
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 11915
Joined: Mon May 26, 2003 5:55 am
Location: Pittsburgh PA

Re: The future of hard drives?

Postposted on Wed Feb 08, 2012 9:39 am

I think of mechanical hard drives as "magnetic storage." I see no reason why this technology would benefit that.
SSD's currently use NAND flash which uses electrical transistors not magnetic storage. SSD-type devices (or RAM) are the only things that could benefit from something like this where it would somehow have to replace the flash chips currently being used in SSD's and RAM. Mechanical hard drives that currently use magnetic storage are limited by the speed of their moving parts, not the speed of polarity switching once the head passes over the write area. In order to benefit from this technology you would have to eliminate all moving parts (similar to SSD's)
Ultimately, it looks very underdeveloped, all that article says is that researchers were able to change the magnetic polarity of a few particles with heat. That's nowhere near being ready for the consumer market. Furthermore, where's the comparison to the polarity switching speed of currently used storage (aka using externally applied magnetic fields)? The only thing they really claim is energy savings (also not backed by any actual comparisons).
i5-3570K, ASRock Z77 Pro4-m, Asus GTX660 TOP, 120 GB Vertex 3 Max IOPS, 2 TB Samsung EcoGreen F4, 8GB G-Skill @1.25V, Silverstone PS07B
DPete27
Gerbil Jedi
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:50 pm
Location: Madison, Wisconsin

Re: The future of hard drives?

Postposted on Wed Feb 08, 2012 10:06 am

Being able to flip a single magnetic domain in 60 femtoseconds is a long way from producing a practical storage device. How fast would the platters need to spin to record terabytes per second? Even 100,000 RPM probably wouldn't be fast enough. Furthermore, this new process only works for writing; you'll still need magnetic heads to read the data back, so your read speeds would likely be similar to drives using traditional tech.

In the grand scheme of things, the power savings will be small. The write heads consume only a small fraction of the power used by a hard drive (most of it goes to the spindle motor and head actuator).

In practice, this development may (if the tech matures enough to be commercially viable) allow the steady upward march of HDD densities and speeds to continue. I don't think it is going to lead to any revolutionary breakthroughs.
(this space intentionally left blank)
just brew it!
Administrator
Gold subscriber
 
 
Posts: 37830
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: The future of hard drives?

Postposted on Wed Feb 08, 2012 2:07 pm

Looks like this article made it to the TR main page.
http://techreport.com/discussions.x/22442
i5-3570K, ASRock Z77 Pro4-m, Asus GTX660 TOP, 120 GB Vertex 3 Max IOPS, 2 TB Samsung EcoGreen F4, 8GB G-Skill @1.25V, Silverstone PS07B
DPete27
Gerbil Jedi
Silver subscriber
 
 
Posts: 1678
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:50 pm
Location: Madison, Wisconsin

Re: The future of hard drives?

Postposted on Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:27 pm

I think Uranium could be the future of hard drives.
imanuelaa
Gerbil In Training
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:16 pm


Return to General Hardware

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests