DSLRs

What you see is what you get, including photography, displays, and video equipment.

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DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 8:58 pm

I haven't used a real camera in a long while, and the last one I had was an old Asahi Pentax 35mm SLR I used in a couple of college photography classes nigh on two decades ago. Lately, I've been finding myself looking at Flickr and GIS, and wistfully thinking about picking up photography as a hobby again. It even got me thinking about my grandfathers old darkroom above his cabinet shop, that he built after he came back from WW2. I really miss those days of carefully lighting/composing a shot and then developing the resulting film. Any suggestions on a nice (affordable) Digital SLR, that I can use as a starting point, but eventually be able to branch out with, once I get back into the groove of things?

So far, I think I'd like to try my hand at photographing the night sky, maybe some tilt-shift, or maybe even some light painting like this guy.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 9:12 pm

Nikon D3300 (cheap), D5300 (articulating screen), D7100 (better controls/twin dials/has the screw drive for older lenses), all 24MP. The D3300 is shipping with Nikon's updated kit lens, which like Canon's new kit lens, is supposed to be a significant improvement. Next, Nikon has the best real mix of inexpensive available lenses, and they have the best sensors.

Consider Canon only if you're willing to spend more money, stepping up to either the 70D for it's incredible video performance or their full-frame semi-pro cameras for access to Canon lenses. Canon's more expensive cameras are enticing primarily because Canon has the best glass for a larger set of applications, but we're talking $2,000/lens before the differences really matter.

Another option is to forgo the DSLR for a mirror-less option. You lose the mirror, and you lose the more capable auto-focus tracking for bursts, but you still get all of the manual controls and the lens selection.

Overall, nearly any camera + lens kit will take great pictures if you're taking your time to ensure a sharp shot, well exposed shot, shoot in RAW, and spend a few minutes afterward in your photo editing program of choice. Choosing a system should be balanced on where you want to go with your photography far more than where you want to start.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
Canon EOS-M|11-22/4-5.6 IS STM|22/2 STM|EF-M 18-55/3.5-5.6 IS STM|
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:02 pm

Airmantharp wrote:Nikon D3300 (cheap), D5300 (articulating screen), D7100 (better controls/twin dials/has the screw drive for older lenses), all 24MP. The D3300 is shipping with Nikon's updated kit lens, which like Canon's new kit lens, is supposed to be a significant improvement. Next, Nikon has the best real mix of inexpensive available lenses, and they have the best sensors.

Consider Canon only if you're willing to spend more money, stepping up to either the 70D for it's incredible video performance or their full-frame semi-pro cameras for access to Canon lenses. Canon's more expensive cameras are enticing primarily because Canon has the best glass for a larger set of applications, but we're talking $2,000/lens before the differences really matter.


Sounds like Nikon might be the way to go at the beginning. Once I get comfy taking photos again, I can start considering the Canons. Thanks! :)

Another option is to forgo the DSLR for a mirror-less option. You lose the mirror, and you lose the more capable auto-focus tracking for bursts, but you still get all of the manual controls and the lens selection.

Overall, nearly any camera + lens kit will take great pictures if you're taking your time to ensure a sharp shot, well exposed shot, shoot in RAW, and spend a few minutes afterward in your photo editing program of choice. Choosing a system should be balanced on where you want to go with your photography far more than where you want to start.


Mirror-less? I'm going to admit my ignorance here, I didn't even know that was an option. I also hadn't thought of how far I'd take it, but since I want it to stay firmly in the hobby realm, I think photographing the night sky, light painting, and maybe a little in-camera SFX trickery would be about it. Thanks for the advice! Got a little thinking to do now. :)
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:06 pm

Look at the Fuji X Cameras. They kinda kill.

With present situation I would not count on Nikon being around for a long time. Competition is very fierce right now and Nikon is not doing well. They bottomed the Tokyo stock market last year. Canon had better get it together real quick as they too are between a rock and a hard place.

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Last edited by PenGun on Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:08 pm

Hz so good wrote:Sounds like Nikon might be the way to go at the beginning. Once I get comfy taking photos again, I can start considering the Canons. Thanks! :)


Pro tip: if you start with Nikon, then stick with Nikon. Likewise for Canon and anything else. You're buying into the system. You'll be making an investment into this so switching camps midway isn't the most economically smart thing to do. But hey... it's your money so go crazy! :wink:
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 10:29 pm

SnowboardingTobi wrote:Pro tip: if you start with Nikon, then stick with Nikon.


That's why figuring out where you're going is important :). Outside of the high-end glass, and by high-end I mean $2000 to $15000, there's not a whole lot of difference, just a little give-and-take. Canon has their gems and Nikon has their gems, but Canon rules the high-end glass roost. Canon also has the best auto-focus in their top-end cameras, and the best high-sensitivity performance.

Nikon has the best sensors, however. Not by a huge margin, but enough to make a difference for a lot of uses, and if you're trying to get the most flexibility for the least amount of initial investment, that's where I'd put my money.

If you're willing to spend more, sometimes a whole lot more, there are plenty of other options. PenGun does some amazing stuff with his Fuji setup, which falls into that 'mirror-less' category I mentioned above. Fuji has a unique sensor and some of the best lenses available, but is limited for things like action focusing, and lacks the real telephoto lenses like those available in the Canon and Nikon systems.

For ~$500, a Nikon D3200/D3300 kit to start is still a heck of a setup. Add in their 50/1.8G for portraits/low light/narrow depth of field shooting, and a Tamron 70-300 VC for reach, and you're got yourself a very versatile kit.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:09 pm

This definitely depends on how much you want to spend.

The D3300 that Airmantharp recommended is not a bad camera, especially for the price. No matter what camera + kit lens you get, you'll probably end up spending several hundred dollars on additional lenses, so you should take this into account when you set a budget.

Don't discount buying used though. Websites like Adorama, B&H Photo Video, and KEH often sell used equipment that's in good condition, and can have a pretty good discount over buying new. They're also great for buying lenses.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:52 pm

PenGun wrote:Look at the Fuji X Cameras. They kinda kill.

Is there a tilt shift lens for Fuji X cameras?
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:55 pm

Those Nikon sensors are Sony sensors and Sony just got serious. They blindsided both Canon and Nikon with the a7R which I am slowly shifting too. A monstrous thing that weighs 465g ... with a battery. ;)


http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1 ... amera.html
Last edited by PenGun on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Tue Jan 14, 2014 11:58 pm

PenGun wrote:Those Nikon sensors are Sony sensors and Sony just got serious. They blindsided both Canon and Nikon with the a7R which I am slowly shifting too. A monstrous thing that ways 465g ... with a battery. ;)


http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1 ... amera.html

So anything YOU use is awesome. Noted.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:03 am

End User wrote:
PenGun wrote:Look at the Fuji X Cameras. They kinda kill.

Is there a tilt shift lens for Fuji X cameras?

You can chuck almost anything on to em' except the Sony E lenses. A 17.7mm flange/sensor distance allows a wide range of adapted lenses. My Leica M lens is just golden on the Fuji. So yeah. You could also use a speed booster with Nikon tilt shift for instance which I think would work very well.

http://www.metabones.com/products/?c=x-mount

I did large format for years and I am not going to bother with tilt or shift although I do know how to use them. The ability to both stack focus and stitch images, pretty well makes it irrelevant.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:05 am

End User wrote:
PenGun wrote:Those Nikon sensors are Sony sensors and Sony just got serious. They blindsided both Canon and Nikon with the a7R which I am slowly shifting too. A monstrous thing that ways 465g ... with a battery. ;)


http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1 ... amera.html

So anything YOU use is awesome. Noted.

Whoa, where did that come from? I was just pointing out where Nikon sensors come from and pointing at why it's now a problem for them.

A few people here at least know I have been trying to get an a7R together for a while now. I have a lens for it. ;)
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:09 am

PenGun wrote:
End User wrote:
PenGun wrote:Those Nikon sensors are Sony sensors and Sony just got serious. They blindsided both Canon and Nikon with the a7R which I am slowly shifting too. A monstrous thing that ways 465g ... with a battery. ;)


http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1 ... amera.html

So anything YOU use is awesome. Noted.

Whoa, where did that come from? I was just pointing out where Nikon sensors come from and pointing at why it's now a problem for them.

A few people here at least know I have been trying to get an a7R together for a while now. I have a lens for it. ;)

How soon you forgot. You were droning on about your awesomeness in a previous post.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:14 am

End User wrote:How soon you forgot. You were droning on about your awesomeness in a previous post.

Could you link that for me?
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:24 am

PenGun wrote:
End User wrote:How soon you forgot. You were droning on about your awesomeness in a previous post.

Could you link that for me?

Search your posts. You know it to be true.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:25 am

End User wrote:
PenGun wrote:
End User wrote:How soon you forgot. You were droning on about your awesomeness in a previous post.

Could you link that for me?

Search your posts. You know it to be true.

Oh lord, one of those. What a maroon.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:26 am

Back on subject, both of you :-p

Sony makes some of Nikon's sensors- Toshiba makes some, and some are of Nikon's own design. They're all very good.

The A7(r) puts out great quality images, and is flexible, but native glass is very slim and very expensive, as is Sony glass in general. That's why I didn't mention them; even Fuji makes more sense here, as they have better lenses, but I'd hesitate to recommend either to the budget conscious.

And no mirror-less setup rivals a good DSLR for focus speed, especially at the high end; but the 85/1.8 in my signature, for example, is very quick, and makes an excellent budget action lens.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:28 am

Airmantharp wrote:Back on subject, both of you :-p

Sony makes some of Nikon's sensors- Toshiba makes some, and some are of Nikon's own design. They're all very good.

The A7(r) puts out great quality images, and is flexible, but native glass is very slim and very expensive, as is Sony glass in general. That's why I didn't mention them; even Fuji makes more sense here, as they have better lenses, but I'd hesitate to recommend either to the budget conscious.

And no mirror-less setup rivals a good DSLR for focus speed, especially at the high end; but the 85/1.8 in my signature, for example, is very quick, and makes an excellent budget action lens.

I don't always agree with you but I appreciate your balanced viewpoint in this discussion especially when one considers your investment in Canon hardware.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:41 am

Airmantharp wrote:Back on subject, both of you :-p

Sony makes some of Nikon's sensors- Toshiba makes some, and some are of Nikon's own design. They're all very good.

The A7(r) puts out great quality images, and is flexible, but native glass is very slim and very expensive, as is Sony glass in general. That's why I didn't mention them; even Fuji makes more sense here, as they have better lenses, but I'd hesitate to recommend either to the budget conscious.

And no mirror-less setup rivals a good DSLR for focus speed, especially at the high end; but the 85/1.8 in my signature, for example, is very quick, and makes an excellent budget action lens.

Since the X-E2 came out there are some great deals on the X-E1, especially used. I decided mine was not worth selling as I will only get about $400 for it. With the kit 18-55 at about the same price used there is a reasonable entry to the X cameras. The X Trans sensor is perhaps the best APS-C sensor for sheer IQ.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:43 am

Canon 60D + Magic Lantern firmware mod.

http://www.magiclantern.fm/

The Canon 60D is inexpensive. Not the best camera in the world or anything, but I have one and I got some very nice pictures from it. I think, right now, it is one of the best starter DSLR cameras you can get, since it is reasonably priced due to its age, yet has more than enough features for the interested amateur. Magic Lantern firmware mod lets you try out very advanced features (HDR, focus bracketing, and more!).
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:56 am

PenGun wrote: The X Trans sensor is perhaps the best APS-C sensor for sheer IQ.


Balancing price, image quality, and flexibility is pretty hard, regardless of the price bracket you're playing in.

Canon shooters long for better sensors to pair with the best glass in the business;
Nikon shooters long for better glass to pair with the best DSLR sensors available;
Mirrorless system users long for lots of things, but fast, reliable AF in all conditions nears the top of the list, right behind good, fast long glass;

...and the list goes on!

Again, the main reason to choose Nikon starting out over an excellent mirror-less system like Fuji's is to get snappy auto-focus and access to inexpensive lenses. Fuji's lenses are better, bar-none, but there's flexibility lost there too. Same problem with Sony's mirror-less range, while their DSLT's are very well regarded- they just don't have the lens options of Canon or Nikon.

End User wrote:I don't always agree with you but I appreciate your balanced viewpoint in this discussion especially when one considers your investment in Canon hardware.


It doesn't make much sense for me to stray from Canon at this point- but if I had to do it over again, I'd be on Nikon DX. I'd probably not have made the jump to full-frame either; but I was both financially and intellectually invested in Canon gear, which made the upgrade to the 6D very straightforward.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:57 am

Airmantharp wrote:The A7(r) puts out great quality images, and is flexible, but native glass is very slim and very expensive, as is Sony glass in general. That's why I didn't mention them;


I would have to disagree here. Sony A-Mount is just about the cheapest system to get into. Shoot, I could put together a pretty sweet setup for $200 or less.

Minolta 50/1.7 - $60 (awfully sharp and extremely cheap. There are literally millions of them out there)
Minolta 70-210/4 - $100 (awfully sharp and very nice bokeh, some of the best you will find on a zoom. Does some awesome portraiture)
or
Minolta 100-300 APO - $140 (great lens, and incredibly small. Easily fits in a pocket of a jacket or cargo pants)

Spend $100 more an an upgraded kit lens (either the 16-105 or 18-135). And with IBIS, all are image stabilized, and all of these are pretty sharp lenses. But, just as any non-top level glass, you may not get sharpness in the corners, but your centers and middles will be spot-on. And they all will AF, something I learned about Nikon's recent bodies don't always do (which is a stunningly silly move, IMO). And if it sticks, you can upgrade your lenses to the f/2.8's. Also, the neat little Sony 35/1.8 makes a great indoor shooting lens that will give you the a normal focal length that the 50 just isn't quite at (too long). It runs about $170.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:02 am

A lot of people are hanging those nice Minolta's on the a7R and getting some great results.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:12 am

Have you looked at Olympus? The new omd is pretty good. Top end features in a $1500 body. Dials everywhere, fully customisable. Their 4/3ds system may not have the quality of a full frame SLR, but the ability to have high quality glass, that's at a decent price, and everything is smaller. It's easy to carry around all your lenses. And it shares lenses with Panasonic, and others. Spoilt for choice. Worth looking into.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:26 am

Rectal Prolapse wrote:Canon 60D + Magic Lantern firmware mod.

http://www.magiclantern.fm/

The Canon 60D is inexpensive. Not the best camera in the world or anything, but I have one and I got some very nice pictures from it. I think, right now, it is one of the best starter DSLR cameras you can get, since it is reasonably priced due to its age, yet has more than enough features for the interested amateur. Magic Lantern firmware mod lets you try out very advanced features (HDR, focus bracketing, and more!).


I learned quite a bit on my 60D about photography- it's between a Nikon D5000-series with the articulating screen and D7000-series with twin dials and semi-pro build. I also learned that Canon really, really needs a better sensor in their lower-end models. That sensor is what pushed me over the edge to the 6D, which is literally at the other end of the spectrum. The sensors that Nikon uses in their consumer range take the cake here.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:43 am

PenGun wrote:A lot of people are hanging those nice Minolta's on the a7R and getting some great results.


And I wish I was one of them! The reason I'm avoiding a recommendation for the new a7's is that they're pricey and that they lose flexibility with their slower auto-focus. Now, they're a bargain for what they do- I can't deny that- but they still fall noticeably behind DSLRs.

TheEmrys wrote:
Airmantharp wrote:The A7(r) puts out great quality images, and is flexible, but native glass is very slim and very expensive, as is Sony glass in general. That's why I didn't mention them;


I would have to disagree here. Sony A-Mount is just about the cheapest system to get into. Shoot, I could put together a pretty sweet setup for $200 or less.

Minolta 50/1.7 - $60 (awfully sharp and extremely cheap. There are literally millions of them out there)
Minolta 70-210/4 - $100 (awfully sharp and very nice bokeh, some of the best you will find on a zoom. Does some awesome portraiture)
or
Minolta 100-300 APO - $140 (great lens, and incredibly small. Easily fits in a pocket of a jacket or cargo pants)

Spend $100 more an an upgraded kit lens (either the 16-105 or 18-135). And with IBIS, all are image stabilized, and all of these are pretty sharp lenses. But, just as any non-top level glass, you may not get sharpness in the corners, but your centers and middles will be spot-on. And they all will AF, something I learned about Nikon's recent bodies don't always do (which is a stunningly silly move, IMO). And if it sticks, you can upgrade your lenses to the f/2.8's. Also, the neat little Sony 35/1.8 makes a great indoor shooting lens that will give you the a normal focal length that the 50 just isn't quite at (too long). It runs about $170.


There's a whole lot to like about using Sony's Alpha system, or what's left of it, but I hesitate to recommend relying on the availability of older/used glass as the basis of a system. There's a whole lot that can go wrong and a whole lot of potential frustration, but I do agree that I've been enamored by the combination of excellent Minolta lenses attached to Sony's sensors. Definitely a rewarding system for the frugal!

*I'll also chime in on the whole IBIS vs. OIS thing-
IBIS- or 'In Body Image Stabilization' is a wonderful technology for snap-shooters living in the shorter focal lengths (sub 100mm), but OIS or 'Optical Image Stabilization' (also just IS, or VR, VC, OS...) is much more effective for longer focal lengths. While having both would obviously be preferable, and that's actually possible with the Micro Four Thirds system, other systems allow for only one.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
Canon EOS-M|11-22/4-5.6 IS STM|22/2 STM|EF-M 18-55/3.5-5.6 IS STM|
Airmantharp
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:01 am

Slinky wrote:Have you looked at Olympus? The new omd is pretty good. Top end features in a $1500 body. Dials everywhere, fully customisable. Their 4/3ds system may not have the quality of a full frame SLR, but the ability to have high quality glass, that's at a decent price, and everything is smaller. It's easy to carry around all your lenses. And it shares lenses with Panasonic, and others. Spoilt for choice. Worth looking into.


The biggest challenge here is the pricing, though the cameras are second to none. Expensive to get the camera bodies, and expensive to get the decent lenses, along with diminishing returns on depth of field control due to the smaller sensor, where fast glass can get you higher shutter speeds or lower ISO speeds but won't readily yield that big-camera 'look'. Granted, for the appropriate investment you do get an amazing photographic tool with unrivaled portability.
Canon 6D|24-105/4L IS USM|70-300/4-5.6 IS USM|40/2.8 STM|50/1.4 USM|85/1.8 USM|Samyang/Bower 14/2.8 Full-Manual Rectilinear Wide-angle|24/2.8 IS USM|
Canon EOS-M|11-22/4-5.6 IS STM|22/2 STM|EF-M 18-55/3.5-5.6 IS STM|
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:19 am

There are really just three significant players in the DSLR market. Canon and Nikon are #1 and #2 in a close race, followed distantly by Sony. All of the others are just fringe players. Choose one of these three, and you'll be on your way.

Don't get too hung up on the camera itself. You'll probably use it for five years and then upgrade to a newer camera body with better performance and features. Once you start buying professional-grade lenses, you'll keep using them for decades. All of the nearly 100 million Canon EF lenses sold since 1987 are still fully-functional with Canon DSLR cameras sold today.

If you were a professional sports photographer headed to Sochi to capture images of fast-moving athletes, you'd have a giant multi-kilobuck lens from Canon or Nikon and a camera that matched your lens investment. For less-challenging professional or amateur photography, the selection of lenses from Sony and third parties (Sigma and Tamron followed by a handful of smaller lens manufacturers) for Sony's α-mount is more than sufficient.

I'll suggest that non-technical factors may influence which of the DSLR brands you start out with. If you have friends or family who are heavily invested in one of the three major brands already, you may choose that brand so that you can borrow or swap lenses.

Don't be afraid to buy used or refurbished photographic equipment to keep your spending down. Most photographers are careful with their gear, so used equipment can be nearly as good as new. Watch for deals on new and refurbished cameras and lenses here:
http://www.canonpricewatch.com/prices/
http://www.nikonpricewatch.com/
(Sorry, there's no Sony equivalent.)
The best e-tailers for photo equipment are B&H Photo Video, Adorama and Amazon.

I like the reviews at The Digital Picture or Photozone.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 11:18 am

Airmantharp wrote:There's a whole lot to like about using Sony's Alpha system, or what's left of it, but I hesitate to recommend relying on the availability of older/used glass as the basis of a system. There's a whole lot that can go wrong and a whole lot of potential frustration, but I do agree that I've been enamored by the combination of excellent Minolta lenses attached to Sony's sensors. Definitely a rewarding system for the frugal!

*I'll also chime in on the whole IBIS vs. OIS thing-
IBIS- or 'In Body Image Stabilization' is a wonderful technology for snap-shooters living in the shorter focal lengths (sub 100mm), but OIS or 'Optical Image Stabilization' (also just IS, or VR, VC, OS...) is much more effective for longer focal lengths. While having both would obviously be preferable, and that's actually possible with the Micro Four Thirds system, other systems allow for only one.


Definitely true. However, if you buy from good seller's such as KEH or known sellers on Dyxum, you'll get excellent glass. The one caveat to some of the older minolta glass is that you will typically have to deal with some purple fringing on tight crops. But, decent software takes care of it in a click (took me forever to realize how easy it was to do).

As to the Image Stabilization, I have often wondered why more manufacturers haven't embraced the simple and effect method that mft use. It is so utterly simple. Moreover, if you plan for it, you can have an auto detect within the body to know when to turn it off. How brilliant is that? I hate that industries get caught in the whole "we didn't think of it, so it is inferior" mindset.
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Re: DSLRs

Postposted on Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:42 pm

JustAnEngineer wrote:There are really just three significant players in the DSLR market. Canon and Nikon are #1 and #2 in a close race, followed distantly by Sony. All of the others are just fringe players. Choose one of these three, and you'll be on your way.

Don't get too hung up on the camera itself. You'll probably use it for five years and then upgrade to a newer camera body with better performance and features. Once you start buying professional-grade lenses, you'll keep using them for decades. All of the nearly 100 million Canon EF lenses sold since 1987 are still fully-functional with Canon DSLR cameras sold today.

If you were a professional sports photographer headed to Sochi to capture images of fast-moving athletes, you'd have a giant multi-kilobuck lens from Canon or Nikon and a camera that matched your lens investment. For less-challenging professional or amateur photography, the selection of lenses from Sony and third parties (Sigma and Tamron followed by a handful of smaller lens manufacturers) for Sony's α-mount is more than sufficient.

I'll suggest that non-technical factors may influence which of the DSLR brands you start out with. If you have friends or family who are heavily invested in one of the three major brands already, you may choose that brand so that you can borrow or swap lenses.

Don't be afraid to buy used or refurbished photographic equipment to keep your spending down. Most photographers are careful with their gear, so used equipment can be nearly as good as new. Watch for deals on new and refurbished cameras and lenses here:
http://www.canonpricewatch.com/prices/
http://www.nikonpricewatch.com/
(Sorry, there's no Sony equivalent.)
The best e-tailers for photo equipment are B&H Photo Video, Adorama and Amazon.

I like the reviews at The Digital Picture or Photozone.


Many thanks for the links! Those will definitely come in handy. :)

And many thanks to everybody who has replied! You folks have given me a step in the right direction. :)
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