Haswell Overclocks

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Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 6:40 am

Anyone have any Haswell overclocks to report?

I've got a 4670K overclocked to 4.4 GHz at stock voltage. I suppose that means I could take it higher if I wanted, but I'd rather stay at stock voltage.

I am pleased with that result after hearing about Haswell's poor overclockability. I am wondering what other gerbils have attained.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:28 am

I have a 4770k at 4.1 GHz at stock voltage with a Hyper 212 EVO. The temps get up to about 71, but when I tried 4.2 GHz they went as high as 94. Just using Folding @ Home to keep the CPU busy. Maybe I should try undervolting.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:34 am

4.7GHz on a 4770K running 24/7 for about 7 months now... but I delidded mine and I'm using a big 280mm closed-loop cooler.

Temps: If I really rail it with the Intel Linpack torture test I can get it into the low 90s [all temperatures in celcius]. However, outside of that synthetic test it never makes it much above 60 even when I'm railing all 4 cores + 4 hyperthreads. Examples include parallel compile jobs and x264 transcoding. When I was stabilizing the system I actually had *more* crashes doing complex jobs that didn't heat the CPU up to uber-high temperatures rather than the torture-tests where all the compute data were kept in the caches.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 7:47 am

chuckula wrote:4.7GHz on a 4770K running 24/7 for about 7 months now... but I delidded mine and I'm using a big 280mm closed-loop cooler.

Temps: If I really rail it with the Intel Linpack torture test I can get it into the low 90s [all temperatures in celcius]. However, outside of that synthetic test it never makes it much above 60 even when I'm railing all 4 cores + 4 hyperthreads. Examples include parallel compile jobs and x264 transcoding. When I was stabilizing the system I actually had *more* crashes doing complex jobs that didn't heat the CPU up to uber-high temperatures rather than the torture-tests where all the compute data were kept in the caches.


Same here. Stable on Prime95 or IBT but not stable in Handbrake encoding video. I found that video encoding is the best way to fine tune your OC.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 9:42 am

My understanding is that Haswell clocks just as high as Sandy and Ivy at stock voltages. The hardcore overclockers are complaining that Haswell needs way more voltage once you push it outside its comfort zone.
Power use is proportional to clockspeed times the square of the voltage, so the extra volts REALLY push up the heat given off. This is compounded by the low-quality TIM that intel used on Ivy and Haswell.

I'm a big fan of free overclock (ie, not changing the voltage). Typical Sandy/Ivy/Haswell all seem to be able to reach 4.2GHz or more on stock voltage (YMMV of course, but that's the general consensus). The problem is that if you actually found samples of a Sandy, Ivy and Haswell that all hit their limit at the same 4.2GHz on stock voltages, the Sandy will probably get to 4.5 comfortably on air, the Ivy will probably run hot at 4.4 and the Haswell may not even make it to 4.4 without water.

If you're serious about pushing voltages and investing in high-end coolers for Haswell, the first thing you should look at is de-lidding the chip.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 10:52 am

I thought about popping the lid off mine but I've regained my sanity. Maybe taking the lid off would get me another couple or few hundred MHz, but zooming out and looking at the big picture, 4700 MHz is 6% more than 4400 MHz, and that doesn't seem worth it at all. So I am really just interested in hearing what the experience of other gerbils has been. I'm happy with how my 4670 has overclocked. This is paradise coming from an X4-955 that needed life-threatening voltage to get 600 MHz out of it.

The sad part is that the upgrade to the 4670K has been the least exciting upgrade I have ever made. It's the first upgrade I've made where it doesn't "feel" any faster during typical use - typical use, I said - I can easily find situations where it does feel faster but those situations aren't typical use.

My upgrade history: 500 MHz Pentium II > 800 MHz Athlon > 1400 MHz Athlon > Athlon 64 3000+ > Athlon 64 X2 3600 > Phenom II X4 955 > Core i5 4670K.

The X4 955 lasted me the longest (4.5 years), and I'm guessing this 4670K is going to last me even longer. It's quite a beastly processor - faster than necessary for the majority of stuff.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:19 am

flip-mode wrote:Anyone have any Haswell overclocks to report?

I've got a 4670K overclocked to 4.4 GHz at stock voltage. I suppose that means I could take it higher if I wanted, but I'd rather stay at stock voltage.

What are your temps? And cooling setup? You ask for reports but your own is not that complete. :P
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:27 am

4770k
Core 4.6ghz at 1.3v adaptive
Cache/uncore 4.2ghz at 1.275v adaptive (see below)

Custom loop 320mm rad, DTEK fusion block. Same setup as here, old pre-ivy pics, ivy is now my home server/GF's computer (x58 build on these pics): viewtopic.php?f=16&t=69451&p=1042516#p1042516 except I pulled everything, rebuilt my block, new coolant, new fans, new GPU, new SSD.

Temps are cooler than my ivybridge at 4.6 (it needs 1.32v). Games in the 40s-50s C range, prime in the low 70s (this is with vcore locked at 1.3 for prime, once I had it stable I turned on adaptive voltage, with adaptive voltage prime would jack the voltage to 1.4 due to the haswell +.1 AVX thing, so I never ran it once stable).

To people having problems overclocking haswell, the big issue I had with mine to get it stable was the cache/uncore. I hit a brick wall clocking this chip that I did not run into on a 4670k. The 4670k was built for a friend, I had on air (212 evo) so I stopped at 4.5ghz, 1.25v adaptive I think, everything else on auto. My chip seemed to stop at 4.4ish, turns out with the cache speed on auto, it was ramping it to match the core speed, with not enough voltage. I locked in the vcache at 1.3 volts also, but it would always run .025 higher than set, so at 1.275 it would match it to my core's 1.3v. End the end, the cache had to be lowered to 4.2ghz, to make my chip stable at 1.275vcache, even 4.3ghz cache @ 1.35v was a no go.

Also, lots of guides say the memory controller has trouble in haswell when the chip is overclocked near the edge, I did not have this issue, I used DDR1600 for all my testing, then moved it to XMP DDR2133 with no issues.

I wonder if the I7 with more cache, or just a bad chip, gave me more trouble where I had to de-sync the core/uncore vs the I5 chip.

I can dig up my OC notes if anyone is interested on all my pass/fail speeds and voltages.

Edit: I was going to de-lid my chip re-TIM, but temps are so low, that I don't see the risk/reward gains for my setup.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:47 am

Flying Fox wrote:
flip-mode wrote:Anyone have any Haswell overclocks to report?

I've got a 4670K overclocked to 4.4 GHz at stock voltage. I suppose that means I could take it higher if I wanted, but I'd rather stay at stock voltage.

What are your temps? And cooling setup? You ask for reports but your own is not that complete. :P


Oh, my heatsink is a CoolerMaster Evo 212 or Hyper 212 Evo or whatever it is called ... with a Noctua fan. It sits in the back room which is about 65 degrees right now. Temperatures while running OCCT topped out at 71 C.

My mobo is the Asrock Z87m Extreme 4.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 11:58 am

My i7-4770k runs at 4.3GHz without adjustments. My chip's stock voltage is kinda high in the first place though so I'm currently running 1.175V which is a bit of undervolt.

Temps are 80ish with IBT and my cooler is a H110 (running inefficiently at the moment which I'll have to fix eventually).
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Wed Feb 26, 2014 4:31 pm

flip-mode wrote:I thought about popping the lid off mine but I've regained my sanity. Maybe taking the lid off would get me another couple or few hundred MHz, but zooming out and looking at the big picture, 4700 MHz is 6% more than 4400 MHz, and that doesn't seem worth it at all. So I am really just interested in hearing what the experience of other gerbils has been. I'm happy with how my 4670 has overclocked. This is paradise coming from an X4-955 that needed life-threatening voltage to get 600 MHz out of it.

The sad part is that the upgrade to the 4670K has been the least exciting upgrade I have ever made. It's the first upgrade I've made where it doesn't "feel" any faster during typical use - typical use, I said - I can easily find situations where it does feel faster but those situations aren't typical use.

My upgrade history: 500 MHz Pentium II > 800 MHz Athlon > 1400 MHz Athlon > Athlon 64 3000+ > Athlon 64 X2 3600 > Phenom II X4 955 > Core i5 4670K.

The X4 955 lasted me the longest (4.5 years), and I'm guessing this 4670K is going to last me even longer. It's quite a beastly processor - faster than necessary for the majority of stuff.


Flip,

Delidding has more benefits then just allowing for a higher overclock. The biggest thing is lower temperatures which leads to longer lifespan. In my experience after many many years of owning many CPU's and GPU's I have never had one fail since I have always ran my fan profiles aggressively. Keeping my temps way lower then the average temperatures everyone else runs them at. I feel it is very beneficial. The lower components run the less voltage they use. For example a GPU running at 80c will use more voltage then a GPu running at 50c thus extending the lifetime of the product. I have no scientific proof beside what I have read about power consumption at different temperatures .
If I was you i would Delid that Haswell CPU and run it at your current overclock and reap the benefits of it running 10-15c+ cooler, I can almost guarantee it will extend the life of your CPU....that same goes for GPUs along with Motherboard components. The cooler they all run the longer they last.
Edit:
I have to say one more thing, My sandy and the newer Ivy CPU's I have heard pretty much nothing about chip degradation. Now Haswell is a different story...in the pretty short time they have been out I have heard more degradation and failure of them then any CPU I have ever heard of. I think this has something to do with the tiny weenie voltage regulators inside the silicone of the chip itself since IVY is just a die shrink of sandy and I have not heard one thing of a chip degrading at all. All I know if I had a Haswell chip it would be delidded right away so the heat can be pulled from the chip correctly instead of having to pass between 2 seperate layers of TIM,one between the chip itself and the IHS and then from the IHS to the heatsink/coldplate.

Here is my upgrade path, first was a pentium 60 that I upgraded to a Pentium 120 with a overdrive cpu, then a gateway p2 300, then AMD was my next bunch going from a 900Tbrd to a 1400Tbrd to a 2400xp all on the same motherboard a ECS K7S5A, then a 940 pin registered memory FX-53"was most expensive CPU I ever bought. then I went to a 4800x2. after that I did not game too much and bought 2 dell HD zinos Both with 3250e x2 dual core 1.5ghz dual core cpus with laptop HD4330 MMX video cards that did pretty good as HTPC's. Then over 3yrs ago I got my 2600k and after the zinos took a duker I replaced them with I3 2120 and i3 2125 CPUs with dedicated video cards to replace my 2 zinos as HTPC's but they gamed quite well.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Sat Mar 01, 2014 7:28 am

I think the way to look at it is this:

Spend $100 on cooling, and you'll be able to overvolt by X%
Spend an hour de-lidding, and you'll be able to overvolt by X%
De-lid and spend $100 on cooling and you'll be able to go even higher.

The TIM is just a cooling bottleneck, if you're not overclocking to the limit, it's not really an issue.
If, on the other hand, you're really pushing your CPU with extra voltage you can either compensate for the TIM with exotic cooling, or you can just take it out of the equation altogether.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Mon Apr 21, 2014 5:49 am

I have an i4670k which I run at 4ghz stock voltage, which in this case is 1.084v. At 4.1ghz it just flat out crashes at stock voltage.

I'm using the Intel stock cooler, and don't really want to mess with the voltage, though I can have it run at 4.4ghz using AI3 autotune from Asus, which increases the voltage. With a stock cooler this is kinda pointless anyway, as it'll start throthling after a while.

---

OP, 4.4ghz at stock voltage. What is your stock voltage?
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Sun May 25, 2014 9:59 am

I finally upgraded and got myself an i5-4670K last weekend and I've been playing around with overclocking it the last few days. It seems I got a bit of a duff chip, the core needs 1.330V for 4.5GHz which gets the hottest core up to 75-80°C (AIDA64 Full). I didn't want to go beyond 1.35v so I've left it that for now. I may delid and use Coollaboratory Liquid Pro at some point but the system is already more than fast enough just now - considering where I came from (X5460).

Since I came from such an old platform I didn't know much about overclocking the latest chips. The most effective things I've gleaned so far are cache/ring/uncore can be left at stock speed (it apparently doesn't effect performance very much though I've not checked, so I'm going on faith) and disabling MRC Fast Boot (Asus boards) helps stabilize memory.
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Re: Haswell Overclocks

Postposted on Fri May 30, 2014 12:53 am

i know some said stock voltage but unlikely, would like you to run cpu-z and see what voltage it runs. on a Good 4770k @ 4.5ghz you are looking around 1.20-1.25volts give or take. Likely board ups the voltage to allow the clocks which could be higher volts then you need. Mine if i do straight 45x in bios it would push 1.275volts.
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