— 11:25 AM on September 17, 2008

I bought Crysis Warhead yesterday via Steam, hoping to get pre-loading started ahead of the game's release today. Sadly, it apparently hasn't become available for pre-load. Or even just regular-old-loading. The Steam website still says the game will be available today in North America. Hm.

The plan, of course, is to test Warhead with various video cards and report the results to you.

Last night, after a long day of testing, I retired to the couch to veg out in front of the TV. But I took my Eee PC 1000H with me and proceeded largely to ignore the television.

I mentioned the other day that my 1000H's cooling fan seemed rather loud, but happily, I found a cure in the form of eeectl. This little program will allow manual control over an Eee PC's fan, and by editing the config file, I was able to create a custom fan speed profile based on CPU temperatures. What I learned is that, by default, my 1000H's fan was, for some odd reason, running at 50% of its peak speed all of the time. That's just unnecessary based on the temperature readings I was seeing, with the CPU hovering around 55°C. It's noisy and probably chews up battery power, too. Just using eeectl's built-in "Automatic" mode improved things greatly. Tweaking from there got me to the point where the 1000H is as quiet as the best laptops I've used, much closer to the Eee PC 901.

I also solved an enduring mystery about both the Eee PC 901 and 1000 series last night. When I first started using the 901, it was nice and smooth with multitouch scrolling in Firefox, but at some point, it seemed to break somehow. Scrolling in Firefox became slow and inconsistent, with some swipes not even registering at all. I knew it wasn't an issue with the inherent design, since the thing had been fine when I started using it, but I was disappointed. Then I got my 1000H, and it was infinitely better at first. Yet in the past day or two, I noticed, it began doing the same thing. Argh.

The culprit? The seemingly innocuous "disable when keying" option in the touchpad control panel. I had turned it on, of course, because it seemed like a good idea. Not so. Unchecking this option restored the 1000H's silky smooth multitouch scrolling. I even dug out the 901, which was packed up to go back to Asus, and tried disabling the option on it, as well. Again, worked like a charm. Something to watch for if you have an newer Eee PC or, I guess, any device with an Elantech touchpad.

With the noise problem solved and the scrolling mystery sorted, the 1000H is truly excellent. I'm not sure what you crazy Aspire One fanboys are on about, unless you just happen to like small screens and cheap plastics. Heh.

Tip: You can use the A/Z keys to walk threads.
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