Thin is in for Asus' ROG Zephyrus notebook


— 12:15 PM on May 30, 2017

Yesterday at Computex our man on the ground Tony got an early look at the laptops that Asus would be showing off. What he didn't get to see was the company's upcoming ROG Zephyrus GX501 ultra-slim hardcore gaming laptop. Yes, you read that correctly. First, have a look at this thing.

For some sense of scale, the display measures 15.6" diagonally. The laptop is 0.7" thick (18 mm) and weighs just a hair under 5 lbs (or 2.2 kg). The top-end configuration includes a Core i7-7700HQ CPU, a GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card, and up to 24GB of 2400 MT/s DDR4 memory. If you've been reading other gaming laptop news this morning, you've probably already guessed that this machine owes its existence (at least in part) to Nvidia's Max-Q project. The Zephyrus' cooling solution was apparently all designed by Asus, though.

Asus calls its cooling system for the Zephyrus the "Active Aerodynamic System." Opening the lid of the laptop levers apart the bottom section of the machine slightly to make a 6-mm gap. The company says the laptop uses that gap as an intake, drawing in cool air and exhausting it out of vents on the edges of the chassis. It's certainly an interesting design, and Asus claims that the machine stays cool and quiet despite its svelte dimensions.

All that hardware wouldn't be very useful without a nice display, right? The ROG Zephyrus' 15.6" monitor has an IPS panel with a 1920x1080 resolution. It refreshes at up to 120 Hz and supports Nvidia's Mobile G-Sync VRR tech. The display also offers full coverage of the sRGB color space, which isn't astonishing but still reassuring to hear about a gaming display. If you need to connect a nicer display, the Zephyrus offers Thunderbolt 3 and HDMI 2.0 connections.

If you want the best of all worlds you don't have long to wait. Asus says the ROG Zephyrus will be available for pre-order in the US and Canada on June 27, and that those orders will ship in July. US pricing starts at $2700 while Canadian customers can expect to shell out at least $3500.

Tip: You can use the A/Z keys to walk threads.
View options