Computex 2017: SilverStone's parade of PC enclosures


— 10:00 AM on June 13, 2017

We took a pass through SilverStone's booth at Computex at the beginning of the month. Gerbils acquainted with the company's catalog know that it offers an expansive array of accessories. We're going to be focusing on the case prototypes on display at the show.

The entry-level PS15 was the case that seemed closest to being production-ready. The ATX case has a tempered glass side panel and a target price around $60. All other panels, including the ventilated front side, were constructed from steel.

The PM02 was another all-steel-and-tempered-glass ATX tower, this time with a white finish and a more style-focused front grille design. The PM02's side panel was made of darkly-tinted glass that was opaque when not illuminated from within, something that might be right up the alley of more conservative gerbils.

The RL07 prototype looks to build upon the following that has developed for SilverStone's airflow-first RL06 case. The RL07 has an angular steel front panel with coordinating LED illumination. The side panel is tinted tempered glass, though the tint was not nearly as dark as that of the PM02. From the looks of it, at least two color schemes were under consideration—one white with blue lighting, and the other black with red accents. Like all of the cases listed so far, the RL07 has mounts for up to seven 140-mm fans.

SilverStone hadn't decided what name to use for the next ATX prototype in its booth; if placed in the company's Redline family, it would be the RL08. If the case ends up classified in the Kublai group, it could be the KL08. Either way, the enclosure has a steel frame, a curvy plastic front panel with integrated lighting, and a dark tinted tempered glass side. The case with no name rides through the desert with one 120-mm fan and four 140-mm units.

The last ATX case in this mini-roundup is the LD02, which has a steel frame surrounded by an all-acrylic shell. One piece of curved plastic makes up the front and right sides of the case, while the left and top panels are made of another sheet of the same material. Setting up a PC inside the LD02 will be an interesting endeavour, given its unique construction. The motherboard tray slides out of the back of the case. Once the tray is free, the user can add their motherboard and expansion cards and slide the tray back into in two different ways, allowing either the left or right side to showcase the PC's internals.

The LD01 is a mini-ITX case constructed out of steel and curved acrylic. SilverStone showed the concept at CES with the SG14 badge attached to it. The case can accommodate full-size graphics cards and ATX power supplies. The back of the case is free of connectors, since the motherboard's I/O shield is rotated 90° to the top.

Gerbils who look at Mini-ITX PCs and think that even those are just too big might want to start paying attention now. SilverStone's RVZ04 prototype uses the fledgling mini-STX motherboard format and an MXM video card to deliver discrete-graphics performance in a tiny package. The PC on display had a GeForce GTX 1070 with a custom cooler in a package displacing just 232 cubic inches (or 3.8 L). For comparison's sake, the tidy Corsair One occupies 12 L of space. The stock Intel CPU cooler in the photo above should help clarify the scale of the tiny case.

The last stop in our SilverStone booth roundup is the FTZ02 prototype, built in the "parts-in-one" form factor popular in East Asia. The FTZ02 is quite slim, but can still pack a full-size graphics card thanks to the motherboard's 90° PCIe slot. The company is still in the fence deciding between the current design that can fit triple-slot cards and a slimmer design that's limited to swallowing dual-slot add-in graphics boards.

Tip: You can use the A/Z keys to walk threads.
View options

This discussion is now closed.