Rumor: Intel eighth-gen CPU prices spill out of Canadian e-tailer


— 10:30 AM on August 23, 2017

The leak-catchers over at VideoCardz spotted a handful of eighth-generation Intel Core desktop CPUs on the website of Canadian e-tailer PCCanada. The listings have since been removed, but they contained product codes and pricing. We wrote earlier this week about how the box art for the new CPUs seemingly confirmed rumors that core counts would be increasing to six in at least some models in the Core i5 and Core i7 families. That gives us some perspective for these purported prices. Grab the salt shaker and take a look.

CPU Model 7th Gen (CAD) 8th Gen (CAD) % Difference
Core i7-x700K $462.41 $484.44 +4.76%
Core i7-x700 $406.35 $407.73 0.340%
Core i5-x600K $313.95 $338.00 +7.66%
Core i5-x400 $235.87 $237.58 0.725%
Core i3-x350K $241.82 $233.41 -3.48%
Core i3-x100 $149.08 $152.51 +2.30%

The overclockable eighth-generation Core i3-8350K should be actually cheaper than its its seventh-generation equivalent. For impatient gerbils, the $241.82 CAD price tag on that model is equivalent to $185.53 in U.S. Dollars. The $338.00 Canadian asking price for the Core i5-8600K translates to $268.64 in 'Murrican money. Finally, the Core i7-8700K and the $484.44 in Maple syrup's favorite monetary denomination is about the same as $385.16 in American greenbacks.

Should these rumors hold true, it seems that prices for the new CPUs apparently increased a little on most models, but are generally close enough to the previous-generation offerings. However, the increased core count in the new models has the potential to net the largest increase in multi-threaded performance that we have seen from a generational jump for Intel mainstream desktop chips in quite some time.

All this might mean that Intel doesn't want to reduce selling prices but is willing to give customers more silicon for their money. It's hard to argue against the notion that AMD's resurgence as a serious competitor in the x86 chipmaking business might have caused Intel to boost mainstream desktop core counts for the first time since the introduction of the Core 2 Quad all the way back in early 2007.

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