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Conclusions
I'm still not sure how I feel about the NIA. On one hand, the device has undeniable potential, and I could see it becoming popular if OCZ refined the concept and improved usability. I can certainly understand the appeal, even if I don't particularly feel like practicing for weeks and spending hours fashioning complicated control schemes—Schuette even suggests making separate schemes for different maps in the same game.

On the flip side, the current implementation didn't really woo me, and it raises all kinds of questions about whether more exotic control schemes are really the best direction for PC gaming. Unless you're Fatal1ty, you probably don't care too much about shaving 100 ms off your reaction times, and you probably have plenty of fun with your mouse and keyboard, gamepad, or Wii-mote already. If it ain't broke, why fix it?

Well, I suppose that kind of thinking doesn't really foster innovation, and I do commend OCZ for at least trying something new instead of looking for more ways to dress up a conventional mouse. The NIA needs a good amount of extra polish before I can recommend it to everyone, though.

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