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Conclusions
Let's wrap things up with a couple of our trademark value scatter plots. In both plots, the performance numbers are geometric means of data points from all games tested. (They exclude the synthetic tests at the beginning of the article.) The first plot shows 99th-percentile frame times converted into FPS for easier reading; the second plot shows simple FPS averages.

Prices for the GTX 650 Ti, 7850 1GB, and 7770 were taken from the Newegg listings for the cards we tested. The GTX 560's price was taken from a Newegg listing for a comparable offering that's still available, while the 7790's price was taken from Sapphire.

The best deals should reside near the top left of each plot, where performance is high and pricing is low. Conversely, the least desirable offerings should be near the bottom right.


Well, well. Despite being thrown into the ring with a more expensive GeForce GTX 650 Ti card with twice as much memory, the Radeon HD 7790 more than holds its own overall. In fact, it's quicker on average according to our 99th-percentile plot, which we think offers the best summation of real-world performance. The 7790 is negligibly slower in the average FPS plot—but it's still a better deal considering the lower price.

Based on these numbers, I'd expect the 7790 to perform even better compared to a lower-clocked, like-priced version of the GeForce GTX 650 Ti. We'll have to run the numbers to be sure, but this is hardly an outlandish extrapolation to make.

The 7790 also manages to outdo the 7850 1GB overall, proving its worth as a successor to that product. Sure, as the tests on the previous pages show, the 7790 doesn't always outmatch its predecessor. Nevertheless, the fact that it does so overall should certainly be of some comfort to those saddened by the 7850 1GB's departure.

Add to that the Radeon HD 7790's power efficiency, its low noise levels, and the free copy of BioShock Infinite in the box, and it looks like we have a winning recipe from AMD.

Of course, Nvidia isn't sitting still, and the firm may not be willing to take this new onslaught lying down. We've been hearing rumors that Nvidia will soon unleash a new card that could land in this exact same price range. Things may be about to get even more interesting.TR

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