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Interior
Getting inside the Elite 110 is simple. To open it, I simply had to remove four thumb screws at the rear of the case. I then lifted off the outer shell to reveal the interior.

The bottom of the case doubles as the motherboard tray. Note that there are no cutouts for access to the back of the CPU socket. Any fancy coolers with special backplates will need to be affixed to the motherboard before they're installed.

The left side of the enclosure has mounting points for two 80-mm fans, a pair of 2.5" mechanical drives or SSDs, and a single 3.5" hard drive.

Note that the fan and drive mounts overlap, so you'll have to choose between cooling and storage. Cooler Master also warns that you can install either a graphics card with a dual-slot cooler or a pair of 80-mm fans, but not both.

The rail at the top of the case has mounting points for two more 2.5" or 3.5" drives. The Elite 110 has no proper drive bays to speak of, toolless or otherwise. There simply isn't room.

Cooler Master provides rubber grommets for 2.5" drives that slide into keyhole-like slots, but these slots are only present on the side bay. If you want to install drives on the top rail, they have to be hard-mounted with screws. I find this decision curious, since 3.5" mechanical drives would benefit the most from the grommets' vibration-dampening properties.

Four plastic expanding posts secure the front panel of the case to the frame. Removing this panel reveals the included 120-mm intake fan, whose vent doubles as a radiator mount. To install a 120-mm radiator, the Elite 110's manual directs that the intake fan be fastened to the outside wall, with the radiator mounted to the inside wall. According to Cooler Master, the vent can also accommodate a 140-mm fan, but you then lose the ability to install a radiator.

Here's the separated front panel along with its tentacular bundle of wiring. There's not much else to it. In keeping with its $50 price, the Elite 110 is a pretty barebones case on the inside.

Now that it's fully disassembled, the Elite 110 is ready to accommodate a system. Next, I'm going to install my version of TR's Casewarmer and fire it up.