Single page Print

Conclusions
Native Command Queuing can definitely improve the performance of desktop systems. Across our nine tests, NCQ performance gains average to around 9% for both the Maxtor and Seagate drives. That's pretty good, especially considering that we saw a handful of much more impressive gains in some of our tests.

Of course, we weren't taking it easy on the drives. Our multitasking traces represent demanding, disk-intensive loads, but we've done our best to ensure that none of the multitasking scenarios we've portrayed are outlandish or unrealistic for a single-user desktop. In fact, as dual-core processors encourage more frequent and demanding multitasking, our scenarios might even start to look a little conservative.

Count on seeing more of these multitasking tests in our upcoming storage reviews. We're eager to see how new hard drives and even multi-drive RAID arrays handle our iPEAK workloads. 

Like what we're doing? Pay what you want to support TR and get nifty extra features.
Top contributors
1. GKey13 - $650 2. JohnC - $600 3. davidbowser - $501
4. cmpxchg - $500 5. DeadOfKnight - $400 6. danny e. - $375
7. the - $360 8. rbattle - $350 9. codinghorror - $326
10. Ryu Connor - $325
Samsung's 850 Pro solid-state drive reviewed3D V-NAND comes to the PC 86
Alleged bait-and-switch tactics spur Kingston, PNY SSD boycottWe take a closer look at the controversy 81
The SSD Endurance Experiment: Casualties on the way to a petabyteAnd then there were three 155
Crucial's MX100 solid-state drive reviewedThe peoples' SSD 52
A first look at SATA Express with Asus' Hyper Express storage deviceSATAe RAID on a stick 46
Behind the scenes with Intel's SSD divisionA look at reliability, validation, and frickin' particle accelerators 52
TR's April 2014 peripheral staff picksOur new companion to the TR System Guide 89
Adata's Premier Pro SP920 solid-state drive reviewedA rose by another name? 27