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Conclusions
From a performance perspective, it's clear that the Turion 64 is the winner. By my count, the Pentium M was faster in only five of the tests, and one of those (the hardware OpenGL test in Cinebench) was probably due to graphics drivers. The rest were either a toss-up or a win for the Turion 64. The other thing that struck me about the results was that even in the tests the Pentium M did win, its margin of victory was fairly small. A number of the Turion 64 wins, however, were by an impressively large margin.

From a power consumption perspective, the Turion 64 surprised me. Yes, our Turion 64 test system consumed 19W more power than the Pentium M system at 100% CPU load, but unless you're using your laptop to crunch that Folding@Home work unit on the plane, maximum power consumption isn't usually all that important. For typical use, it seems likely the Turion 64 would be reasonably competitive with the Pentium M on the battery life front, as well. TR

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