How do you back up your gigs of goodies?

In the wake of my post about data recovery services, an old buddy of mine from college, Dave Kirby, wrote me with a question about how to avoid needing to use such a service.  I think it’s a timely question, since backup strategies for home users have become more difficult than ever.  He frames the question like so:

Problem: Joe six-pack has accumulated several computers and a number of large external drives, all of them are nearing capacity and all combined total ~1.5TB-2TB.  After a co-worker or friend suffers a catastrophic drive failure of their personal data, Joe six-pack realizes his data is not backed up (except maybe a few critical things like financial data).  He starts to examine the situation and discovers:

1) A good portion of his data COULD be recreated (i.e. MP3s and DVD rips of his physical collections), but he gets a class A migraine just thinking about the time involved.

2) Some of his data is not backed up at all, is completely irreplaceable and has high emotional attachment (i.e. personal digital photos over the last 5+ years).

3) Because the vast majority of his data is media centric, it is not generally compressible.

4) His data is heavily "fragmented" across multiple drives and not terribly well organized.

5) He doesn’t have the knowledge or resources to purchase/build and (more importantly) maintain anything like a RAID or SAMBA server.  What is a good backup strategy for this type of consumer?

So how does the average guy protect his data?  More relevantly, how do our decidedly above-average and unusually attractive readers handle this challenge?  Me, I lean heavily on a combination of prayer, animal sacrifice, and RAID 1, supported by occasional backups of critical data to DVDs.  I suspect there are better options.

Comments closed
    • JediDan
    • 11 years ago

    I’m a bit surprised that nobody has posted some real-world numbers about legitimate data.
    I’m a part-time photographer with a RAW photo collection that extends back three years. In 2007 I shot over 5,000 photos (being in school for my photo degree helped) and for that year I have about 30 gigs of RAW images, JPGs, TIFFs, and other assorted image files. I shoot with an archaic Canon 10D (6.3 megapixel) that averages about 6 megabytes per image with Adobe’s DNG compression. On top of these “measly” 6 megabyte files, I have Photoshop layered PSDs and TIFF files which are at least 36 megs and one of which is over 1.6 gigs. Now, I don’t photoshop every image – many are edited out and I keep them for other uses (data hoarding). All in all I have 260 gigs of still image files, 90% of that within the past three years.

    Still images pale in comparison with the amount of space needed for video – particularly HD video. Standard def video takes 13 gigs an hour depending on your compression algorithm and only goes uphill from there.

    I’m looking for the best scalable option to load my eggs in one basket for management ease. So far the best I’ve found researching is RAIF. Haven’t played with it yet, but I’m hoping it fills the gap between ridiculously expensive hardware and the “it’s full, now what?” problem of most NAS solutions.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 11 years ago

    I back everything up to Univac punchcards…keep them in a dry place away from the kids and those things never corrupt.

      • gerbilspy
      • 11 years ago

      Like father, like son! 🙂

    • swinokur
    • 11 years ago

    Y’all might want to check into crashplan/crashplan pro (or crashplan pro for business, if you are a business).

    The clever idea is that you (and a friend or two) all install the software and back up to each other’s external drives. (the contents are encrypted before being sent over the internet.) Thus you get an off-site backup, but you also know exactly where your off-site backup(s) are.

    It is pretty inexpensive, at around $25 for the basic version, and $60 for a version that will preserve multiple versions of a file, etc.

    §[< http://www.crashplan.com<]§

    • Hance
    • 11 years ago

    Well I can tell you one thing dont try backing up anything with a western digital My WorldBook NAS drive what a total POS. I picked one up today thinking it would be a nice way to share files etc boy was I wrong. It will stay connected for maybe 5 minutes and then the conection dies. If you try to access it from more than one computer it dies the software is flaky as hell on top of that. I like western digital hard drive and have probably 8 of them but the My WorldBook drive is complete and total JUNK Stay away from it.

    • indeego
    • 11 years ago

    Home: Vista’s built-in backup to 1 tb driveg{<.<}g Work: Workstations and servers Symantec Livestate recovery to NAS, then offsite to hosted datacenterg{<.<}g

    • sigher
    • 11 years ago

    I don’t use all that backup software, it require you to be organised yourself, which I’m not really, and if you are not it would just end up backing up useless junk since it would have no real idea what to sync and what not without my input and constant attention

    • liquidsquid
    • 11 years ago

    This is where a SSD would be ideal… DVDs and CDs don’t have the longevity required for archival backups. SSDs approach reasonable lifespans until better technology comes out.

    When it comes to film pictures, even they have storage issues with fading dyes, but they don’t go completely away all at once. Of course if you have a fire, everything is toast, but the same is true for digital.

    Probably the best way is to set up a very basic server off-site with USB-based SSDs and move your file diffs over broadband. the first copy could be local before moving it off-site.

    Too bad SSDs are currently fairly pricey.

    This is more practical and likely more reliable than a lot of solutions.

    -Mark

    • albundy
    • 11 years ago

    if i know everyone here, 90% is pr0n. You dont need to back it up. as for backup, i use BR-RE. 25gig is more than enough. also back up certain things to google, and i run a raid matrix.

    • oldDummy
    • 11 years ago

    autobackup to a eSATA WD 1TB GP drive in a AZIO usb/eSATA case.

    Whenever it fills up I delete it and start again.

    • Dysthymia
    • 11 years ago

    I just use two external 500 GB USB 2.0 external hard drives. I have a spare internal SATA 500 GB sitting in a box, but haven’t needed it yet. ( :
    I burn 4.7 GB DVDs as well, but i keep the most important data on the external drives.

    Am i crazy, or shouldn’t external hard drives last longer than internal hard drives when the PC is left on all the time and the externals are only powered on for a couple hours every month?
    (Assuming the externals are always handled very carefully, never bumped or dropped, etc)

    • Dirge
    • 11 years ago

    I am sure some of us would like to hear the recommendations you pass on to your friend.

    How about a TR definitive backup guide? Covering Joe user through to advanced backup needs. You could cover the hardware and software requirements of each implementation. I wish there was a Wiki about this.

    I think something on security should also be mentioned.

      • Lonewolf08
      • 11 years ago

      I like this idea. Seconded.

    • Richie_G
    • 11 years ago

    Currently waiting for Sandisk to make a 1TB USB x.x thumbdrive type thing. Until then DVDs’ll do.

    • leor
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve got a Thecus N5200 NAS connected to my router over gigabit. I’m using 5x 750gb drives in a RAID 5. Any machine in my apartment can access whatever it needs to pretty quickly. I can even play music and movies directly to my PS3 from the NAS.

      • Pax-UX
      • 11 years ago

      I’ve got one of these as well, very nice. Simple to configure, well maybe not Joe6pac simple. But anyone looking for a serious storage solution should look at one of these. I’ve done the whole roll your own and it’s not worth the headaches when disks fail and the space the case takes up. Slap in 5 HDs leave the thing building the RAID5 group for 24 hours and haypresto easy to manage 4TB if you want to go with 1TBs. Create two access modes, read-only for all and then another with User/Password to do actual writing to the NAS. Don’t want anything getting accentually deleted. Now if you need to backup your 4TB, well just buy another one.

      With backups it comes down to just how much do you really value your data. If you don’t care then get something cheap, if you real mean it about data backups you need RAID on your Primary storage + Backup.

      • Madman
      • 11 years ago

      Any sort of RAID is not a backup, good discharge from dying PSU can take care of RAID9999 in one blow…

      • jinjuku
      • 11 years ago

      RAID isn’t backup. It’s redundancy in case of disk failure. I have yet to see a RAID protect someone from:

      A virus hitting the machine, great now your entire RAID is infected.

      An update that fubar’s your installed OS.

      User error.

      A backup prior will save you from all of that.

    • fishyuk
    • 11 years ago

    HP Homeserver. Already saved my bacon on my work laptop with a complete restore. Also have the Jungle disk plugin to backup my photos and docs from the homeserver to S3 for off site.

    Can’t recommend it enough for any windows user.

      • silent ninjah
      • 11 years ago

      I second the Windows Home Server idea.

      Installed mine on a Proper Dell server but you can buy a few ready made systems from the likes of HP.

    • Dirge
    • 11 years ago

    Backups are worthless without verifying the data. This is one point no one seems to be addressing. Is there any easy/automatic way to verify what you have backed up is exactly the same as the master?

    At the moment I uses Md5Sum hashes for more important files. I manually check them, but it takes forever.

    • greeny
    • 11 years ago

    I use my PC mostly for making music using cubase, Recently I upgraded to a new version and wanted to clean up some stuff on my audio drive, so I Rar’d it up in 700MB chunks and burned them off to a few DVDs.

    Then after formatting my drives, reinstalling windows and all of my apps (anyone who has an extensive collections of VST effect or VST instruments will know what a time consuming labourious job this is) and then I get to the backup of my audio drive…

    copy over the rar files from the dvds, and bang one file wouldn’t read from the brand new DVD-R resulting in about 8 months of lost hard work!

    The moral of the story? Cheap DVDs are not a good place to put your important backups!

    I am now considering investing in something a bit better, maybe having some NAS on an old cheap pc and backing stuff up to there every few weeks, but I sure as hell wont be putting 8 months of my life on a DVD again.

    • Tamale
    • 11 years ago

    10 160gb hard drives in a RAID5 array on ubuntu for me..

    plus i have the music mirrored on another drive in my HTPC, and anything really important i e-mail to myself on gmail in an encrypted format 🙂

    • shaq_mobile
    • 11 years ago

    I can’t imagine how you could have more than 500gb of legit data and games.

      • Philldoe
      • 11 years ago

      The drives aren’t full… I jsut plan on ahving them for a long time…

      I store a lot of games on that drive, games as far back as mechwarrior2 up to recent games. so far I’m only using ~400Gb on that drive.

    • Philldoe
    • 11 years ago

    First off, I don’t have irreplaceable data, but I hate having to replace data that I’ve accumulated and thought was worthy of keeping.

    My main computer:
    Q6600
    2x 150GB Raptors One has windows + Application installs the other has the game installs

    4x 750GB Seagate One has Movies one has Game ISO’s(legal backups) one has Photo’s and Music and the other has the various programs and applications I’ve downloaded and use for various tasks

    Now my home file server has a lot less storage space… only 2x 750Gb Seagates that, every so often, I backup the Program saves, game saves, Photos and other little bits of data to. the rest of the stuff is easily replaceable. I use my file server for a lot more than holding backed up data though, the 36Gb Raptor and 120Gb Maxtor holds WinXP + a few games so my buddies who come over can play DoW or some other game with me.

    My #1 recomendation though is for people to dump some cash on a 1Tb or 2 Tb drive and every 2 weeks back up all of the irreplaceable data like Photos, personal data, and maby music. Screw the DVD’s…

    Most people will say that my data isn’t really secure and backed up, I don’t really care because I’ve never had a HDD fail on me, hell I’ve never kept one long enough to fail on me… I do plan on having the 750Gb’s for a while but liek I said if one fails the data on it is backed up and/or easily replaceable.

    I really see no need in having some exotic back up sloution that is inefiecient compared to a simpler solution that will work just as good.

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 11 years ago

      I’d like to come over some time to play DoW…

    • derFunkenstein
    • 11 years ago

    Time Machine + an external USB drive that’s plugged in at all times, plus Carbon Copy Cloner and another external USB drive that has a 1-to-1 mirror of my stuff that gets made every week.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 11 years ago

      That doesn’t really address the scenario proposed.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        I’m smart enough to not scatter my goodies across multiple drives, and I don’t think the average guy does either.

    • davidedney123
    • 11 years ago

    LTO4 autochanger stolen from work FTW!

      • sigher
      • 11 years ago

      What data is still usable after 5 or 10 years? Won’t it all be outdated, even the tax services don’t save records for that long.

        • Jon
        • 11 years ago

        Family records, videos, pictures, thing’s you want your children and grand-children to see. For the first time in history generations that are yet to come will see us as we really are – in High Def so to speak. No more black & white and faded images. This is what long term data storage should be for. This is what we want our posterity to experience.

        • indeego
        • 11 years ago

        The company I work for has data files dating in the early 90’s, still accessed frequentlyg{<.<}g

    • DrCR
    • 11 years ago

    Debian Lenny software Raid5 PC (3x750GB WD GPs) serving as a NAS. Using rsnapshot to backup some of that to an otherwise squirreled away OWC Oxford-chipset external hard drive.

    This allows the nice-to-not-lose data like multimedia to be more secure, while also truly backing up the genuinely crucial data and doing so in a very nice way — rsnapshot hard-linking is really nice.

    I can post a concised version of my minimal Lenny history log if anyone’s interested in doing something similar. A how-to is on my low priority to-do list.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 years ago

      I looked at that, I just hate the fact that you have to use a client. I don’t like mandatory client software. If I could just access it like a web folder, that’d be amazing.

        • Geatian
        • 11 years ago

        I guess it would be a pretty neat feature to be able to just open up a web folder and copy files around. But how do you do automated differential backups without any client software? If you get rid of the software most of the better features of the service become impossible. I mean, is that how you use Windows Home Server for backups? Just open up a network drive and copy over files manually?
        I think the Mozy client software is pretty nice actually. It’s small and non-intrusive. They didn’t try to make it look pretty, they made it easy to use. Just tell it what directories you want it to back up, tell it how often to back up and when to start, then you can forget it’s even there.

        Anyway, I think it’s unrealistic to expect the average computer owner, or even your mom & dad to buy a second computer just to keep their electronic tax files and/or family photos backed up and safe. For fifty bucks a year they can install a little piece of software, and all of their important files can be kept safe “on the internet”, and they don’t have to worry if their computer spontaneously catches on fire or something.

        I’d put Mozy on my parents’ computer, except they have satellite internet (the only broadband available in their area) and have very strict upload quotas.

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 11 years ago

          I like the option of doing that if I want to. For example, being able to move stuff to there and then delete it off my hard drive. Things like old documents that I don’t access very often.

      • Fighterpilot
      • 11 years ago

      lol at Mozy..yeah and when u want your data back ur restricted to 100mb a month download….should only take a few years to get it all back…

        • Geatian
        • 11 years ago

        Where did you hear that? Have a link?
        Once the power supply in my computer died, and I had to use a spare machine while a waited for a new one. I didn’t need to do a full restore, but I did need a few odd ends while my primary machine was down. One of the odd ends were the contents of wwwroot for IIS, which was nearly 300 MB. I didn’t have any trouble retrieving that, or anything else.
        I’m not aware of there being any download limitation from Mozy, at all. But if you know different, send a link.

      • Dirge
      • 11 years ago

      “If you have only 2 GB of data or less then the service is free.”

      *[< Ever wonder why it is free! <]*

        • Geatian
        • 11 years ago

        I’m guessing it’s good business sense? 2 GB is practically nothing to them, and they’re probably thinking that if a large mass of people were using the service for free then a large chunk of those people would become paying customers in time. Also, people like to try things before they buy them.
        So Dirge, why do *[

          • Dirge
          • 11 years ago

          I have way too many privacy concerns regarding online backup. I mean who wants someone mining your data. I doubt Joe user has heard of encryption or knows what a strong password really is.

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 11 years ago

            At least Mozy says that theirs is completely encrypted, and you can even configure it so that you set the key and they can’t even get into it if they wanted to.

            • sigher
            • 11 years ago

            You aren’t a bad-looking guy, I saw your picture in the dictionary next to “Gullible”

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 11 years ago

            So you’re a skeptic, captain?

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            So encrypt your files before you upload if you are so paranoid. In the states you no longer need a court order for search and seizure in the name of terrorism, so assume that at any moment your data can and will be pilferedg{<.<}g

            • sigher
            • 11 years ago

            As a paranoid person won’t you be a bit suspicious about how they stopped complaining about encryption? Almost as if they had some way to get through it but don’t mention it huh.

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            Well if all encryption is broken, then we’re all pretty much screwed anyways, and it won’t matter what is private and what isn’tg{<.<}g

    • Krogoth
    • 11 years ago

    q[

      • greeny
      • 11 years ago

      I think its mostly harder than ever sue to the sheer amount of data most of us have these days, back in the days of 1GB drives a full system backup was a couple of cd’s, go on burn your 2TB drives contents to dvd or bluray or dvd, I’ll see you in a few years when ur done! <removes tongue from cheek>

        • jinjuku
        • 11 years ago

        I think it’s mainly hard because all the self professed geek-elite have no clue between a RAID and backup let alone how to configure a correct backup scheme all together.

    • HiggsBoson
    • 11 years ago

    I buy external HDD and back up the important stuff (personal data, digital photos). I gave up on trying to do entire system backups a long time ago.

    Lately I’ve been toying with the idea of setting up a RAID1 for that stuff too (belt and suspenders approach). But to do that I think I need a new case and power supply.

    I agree with others’ comments that FreeNAS looks interesting.

      • IntelMole
      • 11 years ago

      I looked at Drobo a while back as a network attached media drive.

      It might be clever, but boy is it expensive.

    • Lianna
    • 11 years ago

    I standardised locations of my private files on several machines I use and keep them up to date with 16GB USB stick. In case of problems, USB has most recent backup, and all of the other machines are just a few files away.

    Last week I used Acronis Migrate Easy (15-day fully functional trial) software that mirrors disk (with partition resizing options) for disk swapping – I changed from 80GB in laptop to 320GB (Black Scorpio, 7200rpm, whoah) and I did not need anything but external USB enclosure for that. I seriously consider buying additional external USB 320GB just for backing up the main drive every once in a while (you know, applications, settings). I have to try out Acronis True Image Home, I heard it offers all of that + selecting of what to backup (to leave out e.g. 50GB of DVD’s I was going to watch on holidays or 100GB temporary video files), speeding it quite a bit.

    For average Joe SixPack with even bigger requirements, USB/eSATA enclosure with 1TB(+) drive and good backup software seems like a perfect combo.

    • shank15217
    • 11 years ago

    If you have the time and good budget, the best solution is a iscsi san with about 5 1 TB disks. A few nights with LVM and linux software raid, and you’ll never go back to storage appliances again. I suggest openfiler for the novice however after learning all the internals you can throw away the clunky interface and just use command line.

      • Krogoth
      • 11 years ago

      That is overkill, even for enthusiasts.

      You are talking about stuff meant for businesses. 😉

        • davidedney123
        • 11 years ago

        Thecus sell an iSCSI enabled SAN/NAS device for GBP£450 odd with no drives – well within the reach of many enthusiasts.

        • dextrous
        • 11 years ago

        It’s no more overkill than freeNAS. In fact, it is much better because iSCSI performance is waaay better than CIFS/HTTP/FTP since it’s a block-level protocol using actual SCSI commands wrapped in TCP/IP. Openfiler gives you the same functionality as freenNAS + iSCSI target. I would not call OpenFiler enterprice-grade by any means. SMB would be fitting.

    • FireGryphon
    • 11 years ago

    For all you guys who use external hard drives and store them elsewhere, are the drives encrypted and password protected in case they get stolen?

    Better yet, when you burn DVD’s with sensitive data on them, do you encrypt that?

    It seems like a pretty big security risk to have gigabytes of personal data just waiting for someone to take off your hands.

      • just brew it!
      • 11 years ago

      No, it is not.

      I don’t consider the risk to be that bad though, for several reasons:

      1. I don’t store really sensitive stuff (like passwords to online banking sites) on my hard drive.

      2. I figure the odds of someone breaking into my workplace, picking the (admittedly rather weak) lock on my file cabinet and stealing my backup drives is probably /[

      • Spambait
      • 11 years ago

      Off-site backup is a must. A copy of my data is kept on a portable HD, locked in my file cabinet at work; and yes it’s encrypted. Truecrypt, FTW!

    • just brew it!
    • 11 years ago

    I do occasional (probably not regularly enough) backups of anything important to external hard drives. These are then taken off site (I store them in a locked drawer at work).

    • rhema83
    • 11 years ago

    External terabyte sized HDDs. Should suffice for the average Joe sixpack.

    • drsauced
    • 11 years ago

    I like WHS a lot. It takes care of that whole discipline thing of doing regular backups. I still need to burn the real important files to DVD, though.

    • PRIME1
    • 11 years ago

    Giant stack of blank DVDs in combination with having 2 drives and multiple partitions.

    • CheetoPet
    • 11 years ago

    Dedicated Linux box w/ RAID 1 on a UPS. SAMBA for stuff that doesn’t change (media), bacula for stuff that does (laptop, home dir). Everything is monitored with a combination of cacti, mdadm, sensord, and smartd. So easy a caveman could do it?

    • Nitrodist
    • 11 years ago

    RAID 0+1 of 8 640GB drives for 2.5TB of space.

    • pikaporeon
    • 11 years ago

    I have my music backed up on a 250 GB SATA drive in my closet, connected from time to time with a BlacX enclosure.

    I’ll be grabbing a bigger drive to do more backups some time

    • DrDillyBar
    • 11 years ago

    I myself have ~1.6TB’s of data on drives that are mostly full. On top of that, I migrate stuff off the collection every few months. After like a decade, I’ve got around 500 fully stuffed DVD’s sitting on shelves, and the number keeps growing. I don’t need to hear anything else about BluRay until they produce burners under $200CDN.
    Edit: I’ve also found that for me it’s faster & cheaper to use DVD5’s and not DVD9’s.

    • SpotTheCat
    • 11 years ago

    I just use DVDs. When I was in school, I did a backup of my “school” folder every time midterms rolled around. It saved my ass once.

    • SNM
    • 11 years ago

    JungleDisk — backup UI for Amazon S3.
    I only backup ~15 gigs of stuff though; that’s all I have that’s actually data rather than games or whatever.

      • Prototyped
      • 11 years ago

      ++

      The D-Link’s Memeo software seems especially interesting. A SOHO NAS device is really the way to go here. (I was about to link the two-disk version of it, but the four-bay one seems more appropriate here.)

    • Stijn
    • 11 years ago

    I used to create image files with Acronis and back them up to an external drive.
    Currently I just copy my music, pictures and documents to my old hard drive in my PC with SyncToy. Pictures are also backed up on DVD’s and most of my music can be re-ripped. Critical documents (think school projects) are placed on a USB-stick.

    For Joe sixpack with multiple computers, I would definately consider Windows Home Server.

    • Igor_Kavinski
    • 11 years ago

    Western Digital Mirror Edition external drive sounds like really easy to use for the average joe.

    • fent
    • 11 years ago

    Large external drive. Backup valuable data every month. Only use it for backups and the rest of the time its safely stored away. Would be better to put it in a fire safe too though.

      • mentaldrano
      • 11 years ago

      A fire safe will NOT save a hard drive. Fire safes are designed to keep paper from spontaneously burning (Fahrenheit 451, like the book) – that temp will cook a drive. No data recoverable, unless you shell out megabucks.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    Easy:
    WIndows Home Server. Easy for Joe Six Pack to use. You can even designate an external drive for WHS to backup onto and then you can take that device offsite.

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 11 years ago

      Not that I have an IT background or a great deal of knowlege, but this is my solution vote.

      Also, consider a “top-loader” SATA external enclosure-type thingy. It can be taken to each compy and assets can be transfered to that, then that drive could be plugged into a NAS that has an array of replaceable drives.

      Failing UsaComp and my addendum; Mac mini(s) + 1TB Time Capsule FTW.

      • nstuff
      • 11 years ago

      I totally agree about Windows Home Server (WHS). I bought the oem license. Installed it on an old computer I had lying around. Installed all of those smaller (100-200gb) hard drives I had no use for and bought a few new 750gb drives to help increase the capacity. I was up to about 1.5TB of storage.

      Prior to a few weeks ago, I had a simple xcopy batch script that I used to backup my Vista x64 box to the WHS over a gigabit link. Ran that manually every now and then. BUT, Microsoft finally released their Vista X64 connector software and that’s now changed how I backup. I configured the WHS to backup my main rig nightly. I’ve since forgotten its doing anything. A few days ago, i even logged in to see if it was actually doing anything and sure enough, it had a new nightly backup from the prior evening.

      Doesn’t hurt that I can now connect remotely to my server and then RDP to my main system when i’m away from home. Great stuff.

      For joe sixpack, he could either let the neighbor’s kid build a small PC to be a WHS server, or he could buy one from HP or whoever already setup and ready to go.

        • jinjuku
        • 11 years ago

        Or you could have used the built in incremental backup in Vista and pushed it to a mapped network drive…

          • nstuff
          • 11 years ago

          Funny you should mention that. Since i have Vista Ultimate, i actually did that at first. However, it would constantly fail to copy all files, giving me an error. It’s been a long time since i tried it last, so i can’t remember what error it gave me. But weeks of research found no solution. Nothing i did would allow it to work properly. Obviously, that is a show stopper, but I also didn’t like how it was practically on or off. There wasn’t much in the way of picking and choosing what i wanted to backup outside some pre-canned options.

          While waiting for the WHS connector to support Vista x64, i switched to a small xcopy batch file i created. That got me by for a few months.

          Using the WHS backup feature works well and does exactly what i want.

    • grantmeaname
    • 11 years ago

    I’m currently not backed up (eek). I bought a 150GB external hard drive to back up my pathetic 60GB laptop drive but it turned into a Linux extended partition so I can dual-boot and a partition (100GB) of MP3s.

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