A sneak peek at Asus’ P6T Deluxe Nehalem motherboard

Intel’s next-gen Nehalem processor has yet to be released, but a compatible motherboard has already arrived in The Benchmarking Sweatshop. Behold Asus’ P6T Deluxe:


At first glance, the P6T doesn’t look all that different from current motherboards


Nehalem requires an all-new 1366-pin Land Grid Array (LGA)


The P6T also features three DDR3 memory channels with two DIMM slots per channel


A Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) controller from Marvell makes things interesting on the storage front.


Three PCI Express x16 slots for all your multi-GPU needs


Little has changed in the port cluster

SideShow returns with the OC Palm add-on

We can’t say much about the board yet, but I can reveal that it comes with an OC Palm device that looks identical to the ScreenDuo SideShow accessory that Asus bundled with its Vista Edition motherboards back in 2007. Asus has apparently been reading my blog, because the OC Palm gives users a measure of hardware monitoring support in addition to offering tweaking and overclocking controls. Expect a full review of the P6T Deluxe when Nehalem hits.

Comments closed
    • damtachoa
    • 11 years ago

    Look ugly compare to Maximus II Formula & Rampage Extreme.

    • Chrispy_
    • 11 years ago

    I wonder how much better those heatsinks would actually be at cooling the chips underneath them if all the decoration/logo was removed.

    Cold, naked, and machined metal will always look better than gaudy, brightly coloured artwork/logo.

    In saying that, I think Asus are more restrained than some in this matter.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    Request: for the Nehalem review, would there be any way to include gaming benchmarks at played-at resolutions (maybe just 1680×1050 would be fine) in addition to 1024×768? (just a subset of the chips would be fine too, doesn’t have to be all of them).

      • yogibbear
      • 11 years ago

      But then you’ll realise that top of the line cpu’s mean little when it comes to gaming….

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 11 years ago

        I already know that. You might see me encouraging the purchase of an e7200 to potential buyers in the forums. I’d just like some benchmark-proof by TR to support that.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 years ago

      Oh well. Guess not.

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 years ago

      Woot! Thank you very much!

    • Neutronbeam
    • 11 years ago

    Damage Labs, do me a favor [no, really, as my mobo choice next year is between this and the Gigabyte version] and test the P6T against the Gigabyte x58-Extreme! Enthusiast shootout, winner takes all!

    • Mystic-G
    • 11 years ago

    As long as it shoots down the price of the Wolfdale processors and other mobos, I’ll welcome i7 with open arms. =D

      • Kurotetsu
      • 11 years ago

      Agreed. It’d be very, very nice if Nehalem’s release cut down the prices on the C2Q 9×50 quads, if only a little.

    • vamsy
    • 11 years ago

    I Can’t wait for the review.

    • ChangWang
    • 11 years ago

    Call me crazy, but I’m way more interested in Deneb than Nehalem

      • rgreen83
      • 11 years ago

      you’re crazy…

        • srg86
        • 11 years ago

        Very crazy.

      • AMDisDEC
      • 11 years ago

      You’re Loco

    • fpsduck
    • 11 years ago

    Say goodbye to LGA775 CPU coolers.

    • Willard
    • 11 years ago

    OMG the LGA is arranged as two legs of one of those Nazi things.

    • Krogoth
    • 11 years ago

    I bet that board will cost $299 at launch. I will wait for vanilla P6T.

    Just a quickie on SAS.

    SAS is just SATA-II engineered and build to higher standards.

    FYI, a SAS controller can operate SATA devices without a problem, but a SATA controller cannot operate SAS devices.

    SAS can daisy-chain up to 127 devices, while SATA-II can only handle up to ~4-6 devices. SAS offers greater cabling lengths due to its higher voltage signaling.

    SAS devices are not that much more expensive then their SATA counterparts.

    SAS is meant for high-end servers, NAS and SAN boxes.

    IMHO, there is no real point having SAS for non-server boxes other than epenis.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Umm, not that I’ve shopped around a lot for SAS devices but a quick look at a few websites shows they are anywhere from 25% to loads more expensive for a given capacity. The flipside to that is those SAS devices are 15k RPM drives so probably scream in benchmarks and their intended server market but probably not worth the cost for 99% of even enthusiasts for desktop use.

        • Krogoth
        • 11 years ago

        25% is a lot better than 40-50% premium that was more commonplace during PATA/SPI (SCSI Parallel Interface) days.

      • Hovaucf
      • 11 years ago

      lol SAS is not a “built up version of SATA” rofl…

      Scsi is the same as ATA?!?!? wow then why not just call Scsi Ultra ATA, oh wait they already have that too….

        • Krogoth
        • 11 years ago

        That is because the lines between SCSI and ATA standards have blurred.

        SCSI use to be outright superior solution. Far lower CPU-overhead, hot-swappability and NCQ/TCQ support.

        However, ATA gradually inherit some of SCSI’s features. The only features that SCSI has over ATA are support for greater # of device (daisy-channing), longer cable lengths and protocol is better optimized for multi-user loads. These features are only useful for heavy-duty servers, SANs, NASs, DASs.

          • Hovaucf
          • 11 years ago

          I failed to realize you couldnt daisy chain hundreds of SATA drives together, and the fact that SAS and SATA have two different agenda’s they’re completely the same…

    • SnowboardingTobi
    • 11 years ago

    So what’s that sitting in between the PCI and white PCIe slots? Flash memory soldered into a USB slot?

      • Krogoth
      • 11 years ago

      It looks like BIOS chip for SAS controller. 😉

      Given that it is right next to the controller chip and SAS ports.

        • Forge
        • 11 years ago

        No, it’s nowhere near the SAS chip.

        It’s no mystery, it’s another of those integrated and lobotomized USB drives that Asus put on all their Vista edition mobos.

    • Ushio
    • 11 years ago

    Okay brand new board for new cpu so why bother with an IDE connector?I can understand the floppy connector but no one who is going to buy this will not have sata hard drive’s and optical drives.

    The same for PCI slot’s surely 1 would be enough with all the newer raid controllers and sound card’s using PCI-E slot’s.

    The layout for the PCI-E slot’s leaves much to be desired as well since anyone going for 3 or 4 graphic card’s is going to buy higher end dual slot card’s anyway.

    The rear port cluster is more comprehensive than most and the SAS connectors are a nice touch though.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      The answer is compatability and people still do expect it. While agree that most anyone getting this mobo will have a SATA HD there might be a few that don’t but there will be a lot more with PATA optical drives. The compatability bit comes in to play with the optical drives, although it’s less common now I’ve read about people having problems with SATA optical drives as boot drives not related to ACHI/RAID settings either.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 11 years ago

      I disagree in that I think the inclusion of the IDE port makes more sense than a floppy port. USB drives, slipstreaming and nLite have made floppies worthless. Whereas I imagine people would still want to use their IDE optical drives/burners instead of having to shell out for SATA versions (as cheap as they are nowadays).

    • Forge
    • 11 years ago

    I’ll take one. Asus, PM me for my mailing address.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 11 years ago

    q[

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 11 years ago

      Are speaking to me??

      Sure there are 2 PCIx16 slots, even 3 as Bombadil stated that the last one is one ended. My point, was that there is only one PCIe slot that suppose a full 16 lane electric lane as you can see that one lane is dark blue for PCIe 2.0 full 16 electrical and one white for 8 (last one is black and that is 4x or 1x)… Can’t even put two high end GPUs on this board (not that I care either). Just seems like they are going backwards and not forward. We all know that GPUs are going to get more powerful and cheaper and this MB will not even support it. Just bothers me is all.

        • Dissonance
        • 11 years ago

        Don’t make too many assumptions about lane distribution based on PCIe slot colors 😉

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 11 years ago

    I don’t know if I’m all that impressed…

    Only one full 16X GPU lane?? Sibling of P45s?? Also, are RAM makers going have to start selling them in packages of threes now?

    The way, I see it is that this is a new CPU, impress me with a radical design! People will have to buy a motherboard anyway with the Nehalem, so everything on the MB can be boosted or whatever. Why not force a new concept like a 32X GPU lane or 2 Northbridges to spread things out and balance the loading, I mean if they can do it with GPUs why not with NB/SB? Adding the SCSI (SAS) is a nice addition, but I just think they can do better than that.

    Or it is too early to bitch?

      • Bombadil
      • 11 years ago

      It looks to also have an open ended x4 PCIe slot so four card setups should be possible.

        • SomeOtherGeek
        • 11 years ago

        Yea, thanks for point that out… But it is still 4x or 1x electrical lane and won’t suppose a video card. Maybe a Phys card. Sound and HDD controllers is about all it is good for.

          • kcarlile
          • 11 years ago

          Doesn’t matter if it’s open back or not, you still can’t put an x16 card in it. The NB heatsink would get in the way!

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 11 years ago

    Why won’t Intel boards use a reasonable HSF mount? I hate the damn screw holes. It’s a pita to take out my motherboard because I want to clean my fan or apply new paste.

    I like AMD motherboards for this reason, Just assembled an am2 system for my buddy. Saves a lot of time!

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      I don’t quite understand your objection, are you talking about the CPU HSF? If so the standard mount is the push-pin type through the motherboard holes which is pretty bad in most people’s opinion but does allow for dismounting while the motherboard is in the case if you’ve got a little dexterity. With oversized heatsinks neither AMD nor Intel’s mounts are easy to access, but the good aftermarket HSF all use backplates for both anyway.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 11 years ago

    FREE ASUS ADVERTISING ON TR!!!!!11111eleventy

    OK, I’m kidding, but someone else will be here and won’t be kidding.

    I’m fairly impressed – but SAS? Seems a little excessive for an enthusiast board, doesn’t it?

      • Jon
      • 11 years ago

      That’s the whole point of enthusiast…everything’s over the top bazonkers awesome!

    • Hance
    • 11 years ago

    Nehalem must be getting close if motherboards are showing up.

      • lycium
      • 11 years ago

      my thoughts exactly, cannot wait to exercise those 8 threads!

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