LAN parties: a recipe for success

LAN parties have become the great American nerd pastime, at least among my group of friends. D&D is out and L4D is in. (Sorry, d20 fans.) If you haven’t gotten together with a bunch of chums, connected your PCs together, and proceeded to frag each other in a caffeine and pizza-fueled stupor until the sun comes up… well, then you just haven’t lived. And yes, if just reading that sentence embarrasses you, it is as nerdy as it sounds.

Alright, so maybe you’ve thought about hosting one, but you don’t know where to start. Perhaps you’ve been invited to one in the past, and you weren’t quite sure what to expect. I’ve been to enough LAN parties over the years to know what works and what doesn’t, and in my continuing effort to enrich the lives of people across the globe through my geekdom, I’m going to give you the roadmap to victory.

What to bring as an attendee

  • Computer: You’d think this goes without saying, but somehow it doesn’t. Bring a PC that can run any of the games that are likely to be played, and be ready to go. That means having your drivers up-to-date and your system in working order. Don’t be the guy who shows up with a box of parts, or worse yet, a half-broken computer that needs someone else to figure out what’s wrong and make a Fry’s run. Not only are you wasting space, you’re preventing other people from enjoying the LAN party.
  • Games: Another no-brainer, right? Have the games that you intend to play installed and patched up before you show up. That goes for mods, as well. My personal favorites for LAN parties are the Worms series, Counter-Strike: Source, Team Fortress 2, and Unreal Tournament 2004. Of course, I can’t forget the darling newcomer: Left 4 Dead. Other fun titles include Natural Selection, Warcraft 3 custom maps, and Company of Heroes, but only if everyone knows how to play. The best LAN party games must be quick to pick up, yet difficult to master. If the basic learning curve is too steep, it’ll take too long for new players to figure out how to play and they won’t have fun. I think that’s what makes Call of Duty 4 one of the most successful multiplayer shooters in recent history and such an absolute blast at LAN parties. The fact that it can run on a wide range of computers yet still look great on high-end machines doesn’t hurt, either.
  • Monitor: LCD displays are preferred, since they generally take up less space than CRTs and leave room for more people. Sometimes, a jerk like me will show up with a 30″ LCD—that only happened once, though, and I won’t do it again. I promise. (Before you ask, I’ll admit it: yes, I did it for the e-cred.)
  • Mouse pad: You still own one of these, right? Sure, plenty of gamers use their optical mice straight on their desks, but you never know where you’ll end up seated at a LAN party: sometimes it’s a table, sometimes it’s a kitchen counter. Regardless, a proper mousing surface is never a guarantee, so a mouse pad can save the day. I prefer my vintage 2001 Max Payne pad, but any flat surface will do. Just bring a pad of legal paper if you have to.
  • Headphones: Don’t be that guy—just don’t. Everyone hates that one dude who shows up with his obnoxious 2.1 speaker set, which is always worsened by his terrible taste in music (typically J-pop and techno). Hearing noises from the same game from across the room can also be an annoying distraction, and it makes it that much harder to use sound effectively while playing.
  • Surge protector: In theory, everyone shouldn’t have to bring one, but extras can never hurt. The worst that can happen is that your surge protector goes unused and stays in your backpack for the evening.
  • Ethernet cable: Don’t put the onus on someone else to have one for you. Bring your own cable to get on the network—the longer the better. Even if you get to sit right next to the switch, someone else might end up further away and need to trade with you for the evening.
  • Extra stuff: Whatever you have spares of, bring to the LAN party. Someone will invariably need them. Also, talk to the host to find what they might be short on, and see if you can help fill the gaps.

What not to bring as an attendee

  • UPS: I realize it can be a terrifying thought that your PC might not properly shut down in the event of a blown breaker (or that it won’t receive the clean power such a unique snowflake deserves). But guess what? You can do without it for one night. Bringing a battery you can barely carry to a LAN party only makes you look like a complete dork, which is pretty impressive considering the company you’re in. Man up and plug into the same surge protector as everyone else.
  • Your kid brother: He’s annoying, and no one likes him anyway. I especially don’t like him when I discover he’s “just filling in” for me after I walked away for 30 seconds to grab a soda. Get off of my computer and get out of my house, you damn moocher.
  • Your girlfriend: I don’t know why people insist on bringing their girlfriends to LAN parties. She’ll either spend the night in front of the TV completely disinterested, or she’ll sit right behind you cheering on your every move—even when you’re losing. Maybe you’re trying to show her off, but I’ve got news for you: she’s a girl at a LAN party. She can’t be that great, unless of course she’s got her own computer and participates in the multiplayer carnage. In that case, she’s pretty cool in my book and I’m officially jealous. Mission accomplished, jerk.
  • Your sister: You will hate yourself for it. You’re just going to have to trust me on this one.

What to have as a host

  • Space: Lots of it. Inside the house is preferable, but a garage works well in a pinch. The most important things to consider when judging a space for a LAN party are accessibility of power (use extension cords if necessary) and airflow. Densely packed nerds and high-performance computers often result in a stuffy room if windows and fans aren’t available. Also, come up with a layout that doesn’t require people to climb on top of each other or trip over cords when they need to move. There’s nothing worse than having your monitor go black because someone tripped over a power cord while going for a Mountain Dew.
  • Tables and chairs: Banquet tables and folding chairs are the way to go, but improvisation isn’t out of the question. Dining tables work just as well, and just about any flat horizontal surface should do the trick, too. I dont recommend the floor, however.
  • Network switch: The size of the switch well determine the maximum number of attendees, but don’t be afraid to use more than one. We primarily use a 24-port Gigabit switch, but if several players end up in another room, we’ll toss another smaller switch in there with them. That way it’s just one cable running between the two rooms. And while Gigabit is extremely convenient for transferring files, it’s by no means a necessity for gaming.
  • Internet connection: It’s a LAN party, why the Internet connection? Simple: you never know when you’ll need a patch, mod, or a driver, so having an Internet connection handy can save a headache.
  • Munchies: Chips, pretzels, Chex mix—I have yet to find a snack that nerds won’t consume. Get whatever is cheap and really bad for you. Those are the best LAN party foods.
  • Beverages: Get a couple cases of soda. LAN parties run on Mountain Dew. Even better: if you’re of age, grab some alcohol. Drunken Worms tournaments are absolutely hilarious—just make sure you’ve got room for people to crash for the night.
  • Fast food: Know your fast food in the area, especially what’s open late. Midnight In-N-Out Burger expeditions have become a staple of our LAN parties, but ordering in pizza works well, too. It solves the whole “having to leave my computer” thing that nerds can be so vehemently opposed to.
  • Other activities: Let’s face it: there’s downtime during LAN parties. Games take time to install, food takes time to be consumed, and players take time to argue over what game will be played next. Beyond that, you just need to take a break from marathon PC gaming and unwind sometimes. That’s when you’ll be happy to have other things to do. A big hit at the events hosted in my home are the billiards and ping-pong tables, and Rock Band has become a crowd favorite in the last year or so, too.

What not to have as a host

  • Non-participatory attendees: Kick out anyone playing MMORPGs or single-player games. I don’t care how “phat” their “lootz” are or if it only takes two minutes to show them off. If they’re not playing LAN games with everyone else, they’re wasting precious space. Tell them to get into the action or get out. This goes doubly for people who show up just to leech files.

That’s it! This might seem like a lot to manage, but once you get into the routine, you can have a LAN party set up in less than an hour. Next week: how to properly hit on someone’s sister at a LAN party.

Comments closed
    • End User
    • 11 years ago

    I have been attending holiday LAN parties every year for the last 8 years. They are a blast. Unfortunately transportation/setup is always a pain, even with a car. This year there will be no LAN party as we have decided that Steam, with its great selection of games and awesome private chat feature, will delivery the same gaming experience but without the hassle of moving hardware.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve got some pretty good experience hosting LAN parties. The hardest part is setting up the server, IMHO. Other than that, we just have some tables and network and voila! I’m working on setting up a virtual-server-of death that will have a VM as the main server, then depending on which game we will be playing, it’ll load up a child VM for that game based on a lean win2k image that will automatically run the dedicated server for that game. The parent VM will have all of the file-sharing enabled and also will be configured to be the redirect. Still working on that last part.

    • PH889
    • 11 years ago

    I started planning a small, impromptu LAN party after reading this. Question: What kind of router/switch should I get if I plan to have around 6 people or so?

      • OhYeah
      • 11 years ago

      Non-managed for sure. If you can get a decent gbit, go for that, but 100mbit will do just fine. Just make sure you have AT LEAST two of them. So if one decides to die on you, you still have a LAN party, instead of just “a party”.

      Alternatively, you can get a couple of cheaper wifi routers as a backup (they usually have a 4-port switch, so you can connect the two of them and use in an emergency).

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 11 years ago

      I got an 8-port gigabit dlink switch off newegg for like $50. Works great. That said, you really don’t need gigabit, so I’d say get 3 8-port 100mbps switches and spread them out evenly.

      • A_Pickle
      • 11 years ago

      I usually go for an ordinary router from like Netgear or Linksys — the latter of which I have had better success with than the former. Like OhYeah said, gigabit is preferred (and it is pretty nice) but hardly essential. The only thing a gigabit LAN will get you is faster computer-to-computer file transfers, which… say… if you’re copying s[

    • Pachyuromys
    • 11 years ago

    I may be begging the obvious question here, but… I’ve seen TR picnics, BBQs, meets at gaming or product events, even just rendezvous at conferences, but I’ve not seen a TR LAN party. Why is that, I wonder?

    Of course, TR’s readership lives in widely spread geographical areas, but if you can get together to fry some burgers and play bean bag toss…?

    And of course, collaborative gaming over the internet may render physically meeting unnecessary, but I don’t think I’ve seen anyone organize any TR online events either (aside from the random meet on IRC to do a little UT4, and even that seems infrequent, if at all, of late).

    I just -[

    • StrangeDay
    • 11 years ago

    I’ll take an Action Jim run D&D session over a LAN party any day.

    Seriously, has D&D ever been “in”?

    • Convert
    • 11 years ago

    Don’t be a jerk host: Lan parties need structure, not dictators. No large LCD’s? Seriously? Do you realize a 30 inch LCD is about 27 inches wide, which just so happens to be well within the width needed for a mouse, keyboard and enough personal space. The people I lan with already know everyone’s hardware. Bringing a 37-42inch LCD tv as your monitor on the other hand is too much due to space and weight concerns and if we know you have a smaller monitor we won’t be amused. It’s not like people are so childish as to not enjoy their games because the guy next to them has a larger monitor.

    Just keep in mind that anything you bring to a lan party is at risk of being damaged while in use or while in transit.

    Planning: As A_Pickle says planning is the key. Get an idea of games people are interested in playing/purchasing. Plan based on the amount of people that know about the event. Not everyone will show but it never hurts to have extra space, parts, food or anything else. If you haven’t done one in a long time or are just starting out make sure you plan way ahead of time and make sure people buy the games they need to and actually play them before the party. Planning also means finding out what to do with extra weight like family members or girlfriends.

    If you are an accommodating host you can even have backup systems ready to go. I have found that owning lots of powerful folders means there are perfectly good stress tested machines ready to go at a moments notice. Leave the graphics cards up to the individuals, taking out the video card of their misbehaving system and transplanting it into yours saves money for you and keeps the base system relevant for years. My old E6300 systems are perfectly fine gaming systems once a video card is added.

    Bring your software and keys. Never know when you will need them.

    • Logan[TeamX]
    • 11 years ago

    I haven’t hosted a LAN for a couple of years now. The interest just went away when graphics requirements for newer games got ridiculous. Everything plateaued for a while between 2002-2004 (mostly), but after 2006 it got a little nuts and a lot of friends had increasing responsibilities and less cash for the “gaming rig” budget.

    I resisted and just recently replaced my X800XL with a 8800GT 512MB. Except for the fact I’m still rocking my Opteron 170 rig, I have nearly the most powerful box out of a larger circle of friends.

    I guess LAN interest also dissipates with age to a degree. 🙁

    If they can find a way to relieve the earlier “glory days” when CS was a mod and nearly everyone could play it… maybe LANs will really skyrocket again. I remember attending an AMD Tech Tour in 2004 and being really amazed. I don’t believe AMD is hosting them anymore, not past 2006 if my memory serves me correctly.

    • mongoosesRawesome
    • 11 years ago

    I have to disagree on the no speakers rule. With everyone wearing headphones you might as well just be on the internet. With speakers, it pulls people out of the game and makes people actually talk (or yell) to each other, which I think is a lot more fun. When I’m not hosting though, I usually bring my headphones, mainly because I don’t feel like lugging my speakers around, but I don’t like it, as I feel pretty secluded.

      • Hdfisise
      • 11 years ago

      I just wear my headphones around my neck but the moment any speakers go on it is just annoying IMO as you can’t hear anyone and you can’t focus as well.

    • OhYeah
    • 11 years ago

    No they don’t. If you’re serious about gaming, you’ve got a desktop system with severe horsepower, not a friggin laptop. Laptops are for presenting crap, not gaming. 🙂

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 11 years ago

    Unless you REALLY want this, you can have them much more frequently, cheaply, and conveniently with a password protected vent server and a few good games.

    I hosted a LAN party a few years ago, it went great but I won’t do it again. Too much of a hassle and it’s easier to do the above.

    • OhYeah
    • 11 years ago

    LAN parties are definetely not dead. It’s just that people don’t have that much free time. A good lan party is should begin Friday morning and end Sunday night, giving you more or less 3 days of gaming fun. Now I won’t say that I’m an expert on LAN parties… hell, you don’t know that. I’M AN EXPERT ON LAN PARTIES!

    1) Most important rule: no laptops. You know who uses laptops for gaming? Sales people, and project managers. Sorry guys, if you haven’t got a tower case the size of a small obelisk, you’re not wanted.

    2) No CRTs. No-brainer. (Also, LCDs exceeding the size on 24″ are frowned upon. We’re very glad for your e-penis, but we’d rather have some room on the desk also.)

    3) No speakers. No exceptions for this rule, ever.

    4) Decent mousepads. No, your 5×5 inch Final Fantasy mousepad won’t do.

    5) Everything must be fault-tolerant (meaning you’ve got to have backups for EVERYTHING). Extra hard drives, video cards, cables from 1.5m to 10m, triple switches and wifi routers, backup keyboards and mice, extra mousepads (and I mean decent gaming pads).

    6) A dedicated gaming server will score you bonus points.

    If you don’t take the business of arranging a good LAN party seriously, you might as well throw a sauna party with beer and forget about gaming altogether.

    As for the games, the last LAN party we threw we played mostly only two games: Team Fortress 2 and Far Cry 1. Far Cry 1 might sound like a weird choice for FPS game in a LAN party but it was actually really fun.

      • mbutrovich
      • 11 years ago

      No laptops? That makes no sense. You’re going to say no to large monitors for space concerns, but then discriminate against those that take up the smallest footprint and are the easiest to get set up with laptops? Since when is form factor a concern? What if someone shows up with a new iMac running Boot Camp to play games on?

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      Some laptops these days run circles around 2-3 year old desktopsg{<.<}g

      • ludi
      • 11 years ago

      What do you care about somebody’s laptop? Bring whatever you want as long as it doesn’t take excessive space, catch fire, or attempt to enslave humanity. Expect to be booted out of a game if you’re making it laggy for everyone else…laptop or desktop. Apart from that, who cares?

      • ssidbroadcast
      • 11 years ago

      THERE’S A FINAL FANTASY MOUSEPAD?!

      /drool

      • moose17145
      • 11 years ago

      Yea i suppose i can maybe see the laptops thing to a certain extent… If its a total POS, then yea… laptops suck…. but lots of the games me and my buddies love to play are UT2004 and Fay Cry 1 (seriously… engineering teams are the way to success if you are on the defensive), and my laptop handles both of those just fine. Last lan i was at i knew multiple people who only brought their laptops because they knew their videocard in them could handle the games just fine. Just because you can max the settings out doesn’t mean laptops cannot play games. Heck mine runs Far Cry on all high settings without any lag at all at 1280×800

      • A_Pickle
      • 11 years ago

      I resent you and your convenience-hating LAN ways.

      • Asator
      • 11 years ago

      There is nothing wrong with bringing a laptop vs a desktop, just as long as whatever you bring has the grunt to play whatever you’re going to be playing. My laptop has nowhere near the grunt of my desktop but it’s been damn handy for lans where I can only stay 5 hours because I have work early the next morning (and no, going to work after no sleep is not an acceptable option when you have a proper job). We’ve been held back far more by desktops not up to running recent games than laptops recently.

      • Vasilyfav
      • 11 years ago

      Honestly, those are borderline retarded rules.

        • OhYeah
        • 11 years ago

        Nice troll. Care to explain? Going around and calling people “retards” isn’t actually a very good way of making your point.

    • jss21382
    • 11 years ago

    Our lan parties usually lasted all weekend, and as a group of friends that played eq/eq2/wow pretty hardcore at times we’d usually have people taking breaks from the lan to raid, though if it was your usual 4-6 hour lan party I could see the problem with that.

    • dolemitecomputers
    • 11 years ago

    At my office we coordinate a lan party every month or so. I would say the biggest issue is making sure that people have the games installed and patched before the day of. We usually spend a good hour getting everyone ready.

    • SecretMaster
    • 11 years ago

    Hmm, it appears I’m still stuck in the stone age. I’m still rolling my d20’s, and my level 8 Dwarven Cleric is about to start gaining some fighter levels (eventually I’ll prestige to Dwarven Defender I suppose).

    • jackaroon
    • 11 years ago

    Oh snap, that’s the Sham-wow guy, top right!

      • willyolio
      • 11 years ago

      since when did they stop calling them Shammies? Sham-wow? i mean, i thought Shammy was silly name, but Sham-wow just takes the cake.

        • aleckermit
        • 11 years ago

        Have you not seen the sham-wow commercial? It’s really anoyying ;p

        “Alright I’m going to do this in real-time, you following me camra guy?”

        *switches camra*

    • aleckermit
    • 11 years ago

    Me and 8 other guys used to LAN-up and play Quake 3: Team Arena on the school computers in after-school. I was the youngest but I always kicked their asses using a custom Gumby model :).

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 11 years ago

    The only successful LAN parties I’ve ever been part of were really small ones or Starcraft LAN parties. The problem with LAN parties is that everyone has to have a computer that’s capable of playing the game of the night and almost none of my friends have a capable gaming machine, so that’s where Starcraft comes in handy. SC will run on pretty much anything.

      • gtoulouzas
      • 11 years ago

      Yes it will. I have this bizzare idea that, sooner or later, Microsoft will pay Blizzard for the royalties and make Starcraft a pack-in a la minesweeper for a future version of Windows.

      Think about it. It simply makes sense!

    • shaq_mobile
    • 11 years ago

    lan parties are fun but its incredibly hard to get average gamers pealed away from WoW or other mmo’s and they not only take up space but they are a total buzzkill. especially when they try to drag people over to show off their gear and hop on vent and raid at the lan party.

    l4d is awesome because its the first pc game thats mainstream and successfully included great co-op. but its really only co-op up to 4 players and they totally lied (or at least pulled a steve jobs) on their advertising.

    we got to use all the guns in the demo that you get in the game… they claimed 20 weapons but all they have are shotgun, better shotgun, smg, better smg (assault rifle), sniper rifle and the same pistols with option for dual wield. give me a break. it pisses me off when i play a game and i get the feeling that the developers started saying “yeah screw it, they wont notice, lets call it good”.

    aside from that l4d is awesome lan party game… too bad i cant pry people away from WoW. theyre all too busy with misplaced dreams of hope, that people will care if they are the 1,000,000th person to get season 18 RECKLESS AVENGERS ARMOR. retarded.

      • SpikeMeister
      • 11 years ago

      You can play versus, which includes up to 8 people, two teams of four co-operating players.

    • Krogoth
    • 11 years ago

    LAN parties are mostly a thing of the past. These days, they are typical done in college dorms.

    VPNs and generous amounts of internet bandwidth make it more practical and easier to setup private servers for friends and relatives to play stuff. It is not even that hard to work around NATs.

      • Xenolith
      • 11 years ago

      Just don’t do them as often. Only fun ones lately have been “retro” parties… where we bring out the 5-10 year old games. I’m down to just two LAN parties a year now. Use to be around 10.

      • moose17145
      • 11 years ago

      I think you miss the point of LAN Parties

        • joselillo_25
        • 11 years ago

        mmm… girls?

        • Meadows
        • 11 years ago

        Then so do I.
        I just don’t get the appeal.

      • nstuff
      • 11 years ago

      I can’t agree. At least in Central PA, as I said in my other post, i’ve been going to a LAN party just about every month (www.fites.net). On the weekends, a decent number of people from the lan party gets together either for games via internet or vpn.

      They’ve also just posted information on their upcoming 150 man lan.

      I can’t see lan parties dying if they are able to fill 150 seats year after year.

      Pros for Lan Parties: No lag, Depending on the size, no need for a microphone, Show off any cool case mods, Good time to socialize before and after playing games… go grab some food together or have food ordered in, Can put a name to a face, Build friendships that aren’t solely reliant on a specific game, etc.

      Cons for Lan Parties: It is usually a slight annoyance to have to drag your computer to the destination, especially since moving your rig could cause potential hardware issues. For those hosting, the setup can be a chore.

        • moose17145
        • 11 years ago

        Well i suppose i can agree partly with you. The larger LANs seem to be doing a fine job at sustaining themselves, of that i will not argue. I also cannot argue that hosting can be a major PITA at times. Usually it’s worth it in the end though.

        I do think a lot of the idea of the LAN has died though. Anymore it seems like unless it is a monster 50+ person event its simply not happening. I remember when my buddies and i would throw like smaller 6 or 8 person LANs, just for the excuse to have one and all get together and act like idiots for a night. Btw, for those living in northern climates, LANs during monster snow storms are awesome! Idk why… maybe it’s the fact i live in MN and we are all a big weird up here… but something about the snow just makes it all the more fun for everybody. Anymore though it seems like the small LAN being held at a persons home or garage just doesn’t hardly happen anymore.

        Meadows – LANs aren’t for everyone. I guess i can’t really say it simpler than that. It’s not that LANs are practical, or that they are logical… cause today they simple aren’t. Yes it would be easier to all log online and meet each other in game, and talk via a VOIP client. But to me it’s just not near as fun. It’s all about getting into it… if you can get into it then you will probably have a fun time. If all you can think and worry about is how much effort it was to break down your computer setup only to try to squeeze it onto a coffee table with two other people already setup on it, then you may not enjoy it. Plus it’s like Abrasion said, there is a certain amount of nostalgia to it. You do not have to be in childhood to enjoy them though. Heck i know 40 year olds that go to them occasionally. Granted they say they have a harder time pulling an all nighter than they used to, but that they still find it to be a blast. They are just young at heart i guess and enjoy being able to do some of the stupid or silly things that they primarily did as a kid. After all… life can’t be all work…

        If you have never been to one before meadows… i seriously suggest you try it at least once. It really can be a jolly fun time! If you have done them before, and didn’t enjoy it, i would guess you either didn’t get into it, or maybe went to one where you didn’t know anyone there (or just simply went to the wrong LAN, not all of them are winners, i have been to some bad ones in the past, and even held a couple of busts myself ), or they simply aren’t for you. Nothing wrong with that either way, as i said, they aren’t for everyone.

    • A_Pickle
    • 11 years ago

    LAN parties are awesome!

    My two roommates and myself are the hosts of what HAVE to be the best, private LAN parties in the Cheyenne, WY area (PM me if you’re from around there — it’d be cool to have you over!). That said, I have to add my two cents regarding LAN parties.

    *[<_[

    • d3m0n5
    • 11 years ago

    omg reading the comments just makes me go nuts…
    why did LAN parties ever die out???
    I remember coordinating my buddies in trying to set up a LAN party back when DOOM 1 JUST came out. We rushed home, figured out how to set up the parallel port connection for some 2 play deathmatch and cooperative loving.
    Once we realized we could play 4 players via 10Base2 we were sold. My buddy sourced cabling and network cards (back then network cards were not cheap as chips and did not come by default on mobo’s) and played 4 player DOOM craziness.

    • indeego
    • 11 years ago

    I have been to about 4 parties, and hosted my own earlier this year (at work!). I was somewhat disappointed that people bailed so early after starting, as I’d put in a lot of effort getting it setup, I supplied the 22″ screens, food, UPS, permission, etc. It was closer to 4 hours worth of work on my end, cleaning up time included, maybe I should have made people lug monitors?

    CoD4 was a ton of fun, and I imagine L4D would also, although the draw of that game is losing its lustre latelyg{<...<}g

      • engti
      • 11 years ago

      make friends with people who have girlfriends living in other cities. they usually have a lot of time to kill 🙂

      awesome fun many a weekends.

      but then maybe i should just get a girlfriend 🙂

        • indeego
        • 11 years ago

        Every one of us have girlfriends/wives/pseudowives. Some of them play, also, just had other things going on like playing with barbie dolls or whatever women do these days when not submitting to men’s whimsg{<.<}g

    • SnowboardingTobi
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve never been to a LAN party, but that’s probably because my main computer was a full tower that felt like 40lbs plus my old 19″ CRT that was probably just as heavy.

    I missed out on a part of my geekhood. =( I’m a sad panda.

      • Hdfisise
      • 11 years ago

      Theres still time to go to one you know 😉 Just google around and there should be plenty I expect or even better host one yourself!

      • moose17145
      • 11 years ago

      You used the term “Sad Panda” … i assure you… you are still in your “geekhood”, as only a geek / nerd would use that term

    • Hdfisise
    • 11 years ago

    One of my friends parents allow us to have regular lan parties at there workplace so it is absolutely great for me 😀

    However we do suffer from a lot of the last point or people choosing to play games that not everyone knows how to play which can make it extremely boring at times :\ Try playing dota on WC3 with people that know everything about it while you don’t….

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      Yeah I went to a CS party after playing only Q3 and I thought I would be able to cream most of them…. the game skills didn’t really transfer over as easily as I’d hoped and I was pwn3d insteadg{<.<}g

      • jimmylao
      • 11 years ago

      This has happened to me on more than one occasion, you just have to give them time to learn while teaching them (lots of patience). However, once they learn and like it aka become addicted, or not…then it just goes from there.

      I bet when Matt said “wc3 custom maps” => dota/tower d wut wut, everyone knows how to play tower d.

    • nstuff
    • 11 years ago

    Very good list. Some thoughts:

    One thing not really listed is that an attendee can’t always rely on the fact that internet may be accessible at the LAN party. Even though the host usually tries to make sure the internet is up, things do happen. So, always make sure you have installed all your games, fully patched them, and made sure they are indeed working.

    Also, with the advent of Steam, if you have any games purchased through Steam, make sure you load it up at home before taking your computer to the LAN party. The Steam client gets updated very frequently. Also, make sure your steam password is saved in the client. If the internet connection is down at the LAN party, you can always go into ‘off-line’ mode and play like normal.

    Most larger LAN party groups have forums and are happy for you to jump in and suggest some games to play ahead of time. If you have a game (old or new) that you aren’t sure will be played at the LAN, pop in the forums and see if there is any interest. With smaller LAN parties, just send an e-mail out to the group and see if there’s interest.

    Outside of small LAN parties that I or my brother hosts, I’ve been going to a monthly LAN party in Central PA (www.fites.net). Great group of guys and I can’t think of anything on your list that they don’t always have covered.

    • Tamale
    • 11 years ago

    Ha, count me in with the girlfriend (fiance now actually) who likes to game. When we went to a lan party hosted by a friend of mine, we both brought our laptops and she kept right along with most of the pack in TF2 and UT2K4.

    A great post overall, but I’m saddened that from what I’ve seen, lan parties aren’t nearly as popular as they used to be considering the speed offered by typical broadband connections and the ease-of-use of systems like steam for playing with friends.

    5-7 years ago I got together with friends from literally all over the country to play half-life deathmatch.. we were hardcore mofos. The best part for me was showing off my ridiculous case mods XD

      • moose17145
      • 11 years ago

      I have to agree… anymore it seems as if LANs just are not as common… 3 – 5 years ago for me it would have been (as i am only 22 right now), we had at least a couple of LANs a year, usually hosted by a couple of different people. Hell we’d go to LANs hosted by people we didnt even really like just for the sake of going to a LAN, and likewise we would let people into our LANs we didnt really like or care for because we knew they were just doing the same crap we did… so it was a whole “The more the merrier” thing.

    • Jon
    • 11 years ago

    *[

    • ludi
    • 11 years ago

    The parents of one of my college friends have an enormous vacation home up in the hills about twenty minutes from town, and most of the lower level is subdivided into a two rooms that were respectively (a) a theater pimped to the gills, including one of the best HD projectors on the market at the time and (b) a rec-room populated solely by a dart board and a full-sized billiards table. There was an ocean of free space everywhere else, and his folks didn’t care who he hosted there, so long as nothing was broken and the place was fully cleaned up afterward.

    We got to have two 14-hour LAN parties there, 4pm-7am inclusive of setup and teardown, before everyone moved on to their separate lives. Best…LAN parties…/[

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