Thoughts on the Windows 7 beta

I’ve already written at length about my (generally positive) appraisal of Windows Vista, yet I’m still eagerly looking forward to Windows 7. While I find Vista to be a substantial improvement over Windows XP, my rose-tinted glasses don’t blind me to some of its quirks and shortcomings—randomly resetting folder views, over-eager UAC prompts, the poorly thought-out sidebar, and other little snags. Microsoft seems to be shaping Windows 7 into a "second time’s the charm" sort of release, taking Vista’s solid base and adding a layer of polish and improvements on top. Sounds good to me.

Curious to see the Windows team’s progress, I grabbed the public beta this weekend and installed it on my MacBook (yes, you can do that). I’ve been tinkering with it on and off, and I have a few observations.

The taskbar

Let me start with what’s simultaneously the most noticeable change and my biggest beef: the new taskbar. The concept of displaying only applications and treating windows as their subsets seems very sensible to me, and if well executed, I think it makes multi-tasking easier. Mac OS X’s dock works just like that, and I love being able to quickly show and hide entire applications instead of juggling with a bunch of windows.

I expected Microsoft to have largely copied that concept with Windows 7, but it didn’t. In fact, the application icons in the Windows 7 taskbar behave very much like "grouped" windows sets in Vista and XP. This is bad.

Say you have an Internet Explorer or OpenOffice.org window minimized. You can quickly restore it by clicking the application icon in the taskbar. Nothing could be simpler, right? Except, once you open a second window or tab, things get hairy. Clicking the taskbar icon suddenly presents you with a thumbnail menu. Instead of just showing the application and letting you do your thing, Microsoft apparently expects you to painstakingly select a window (or browser tab) out of a list of thumbnails each time.

I think this is the symptom of a broader problem with the new taskbar idea, though. Emulating Mac OS X’s dock is all well and good, but Mac OS is and has always been application-centric. OS X windows only exist as part of their host application, and applications stay open even when you close all of their windows. The dock is simply a tool to switch between applications.

In Windows tradition, by contrast, each window has its own menu bar (or something equivalent) and exists as a discrete entity in the taskbar. Instead of switching between apps, you switch between windows. Well, Windows 7 has grafted in an application-centric taskbar without following through on the window management front. That’s a bit like clumsily transplanting a set of gills onto a mammal, pumping it full of immunosuppressant drugs, and throwing it into the sea. That poor thing’s gonna drown.

I realize this is the first beta release, and Microsoft has plenty of time to iron things out. It probably will, too, because there’s no way testers aren’t going to complain about having to manually select a window thumbnail half the time they want to un-minimize something. That involves moving your mouse cursor all the way down and then back up a notch, which just feels slow and unnatural. You can also CTRL-click to restore the last open window, but that’s just as awkward.

If someone from the Windows team is somehow reading this blog, let me suggest the following: keep the application-centric taskbar, but make it so clicking an application icon alternately minimizes and restores all windows for that app. Then implement a way to toggle only a single window—the current hovering system would probably do a fine job. I know there’s already a control panel option to switch back to the old window-centric design, but I genuinely think the app-centric concept is a step in the right direction. It just needs to be implemented properly.

The rest

That’s my only real complaint about Windows 7, though, and I’m actually quite impressed with everything else I’ve seen. I really like the libraries, which more or less abolish the antiquated "My Document" concept and provide you with a centralized path to access all of your music, documents, photos, etc—no matter how many hard drives or directories they’re split up into. And better still, Windows 7 lets you create your own custom libraries.

Microsoft has also improved the User Account Control system, so you no longer receive prompts when modifying control panel settings or moving things around in the Program Files directory. If you find those settings too lax (or still too strict), Microsoft offers one setting above the default and two below. That’s worlds better than annoying users into disabling UAC entirely.

Finally, my brush with Windows 7 appears to confirm my previous assessment: Microsoft really does seem to have focused chiefly on spit and polish. Despite the beta nature of this release, everything somehow feels cleaner and less hastily thrown together than in Vista. Core apps like Paint, Wordpad, and the Windows Calculator have received long-needed overhauls, and the control panel has far fewer Windows 2000-era relics.

I also love the little touches, like the progress meter in the taskbar for file transfers, the ability to maximize or "half-maximize" windows by simply dragging them to the edge of the display, the way you can turn windows transparent to see what’s underneath, and the fully configurable system tray (which lets you pick exactly which icons you want to display).

I think Windows still has the same flaws it’s always had—too much apparent complexity and too little consistency—but if the taskbar kinks get ironed out, Windows 7 really has the potential to be the best Microsoft OS of this decade. And unlike Windows Vista, it should take a significant step forward without hurting backward compatibility all that much. The simple fact that it’s happily running on my MacBook with Apple’s Vista drivers is evidence enough, I believe.

Comments closed
    • oldDummy
    • 11 years ago

    Been using the beta for a week now.

    Runs great…except for the browser.

    IE8 is driving me to drink, well…..maybe it’s not the browser 😉

    Anyway it hangs all the time and it won’t take an IE7 install.

    Damn, wanted to use this OS 24/7.

    Otherwise it runs well.

    • dustyjamessutton
    • 11 years ago

    Doesn’t anybody remember the Windows XP x64 betas? They seemed like a finely finished product. Microsoft can make good betas if they wan’t. XP x64 was proof of it as well as Windows 7 beta 1. In fact I used Windows XP x64 beta 2 as my main os for a while, until it wen’t gold. However, it was kind of a failure as nobody made they’re uncompatible applications compatible for it, as programmers we’re awaiting Vista before they fixed any of their apps. Kind of a bummer as I would still be using XP x64 if they hadn’t abandoned it. I’m downloading Windows 7 x64 as I speak and hopefully I can use it as my main os until the next beta release.

    • HurgyMcGurgyGurg
    • 11 years ago

    So… what does this mean for Microsoft V. Apple?

    It seems Apple has enjoyed its largest growth with the Vista “Disaster”, now that Windows 7 is shaping up to be great, at least in the minds of the fickle public, could Apple be facing some rougher times?

    I’m especially interested in Microsoft’s “diss” at Apple regarding value, if Microsoft pushes forward with a “Value” campaign, in these tough economic times, they could really gain back market share. I’m all for competition but when people are being forced to upgrade from XP, due to it being to slow, (Which is just about everyone), odds are the average consumer is in a lot of pain when they try to justify over a $1000 Apple computers, when Microsoft seems to be a good alternative now, and offers suitable $500 computers.

    I’m all for competition and Apple may be needing to adjust its “Apple Tax” policy in order to combat this.

    After all Apple has gained the view of the high end “Luxury” and we all know whats first to go in an economic crisis.

    Well done Microsoft, your Marketing department did a great job winning back the hearts of millions, and 7 is not even out yet.

    • Thanato
    • 11 years ago

    Any news on Windows 8? I like upgrading every year…. Thanks.

      • brucect
      • 11 years ago

      why ?
      they will sux it more and more :))

        • Thanato
        • 11 years ago

        Yes, and then after a while nobody will want to own computer. Cloud computing will take over and we can pay per minute to use a computer, while big brother can watch over us, protecting us. awww.

        I love big brothers!! down with conspiracy theory’s!!

    • mirkin
    • 11 years ago

    As a consummate Vista hater, I was eager to try Windows 7 Beta. I find it to be very usable and smooth feeling. It is what Vista should have been like, it is a pleasure to operate.

    I also really hope they improve the task bar minimizing / un-minimizing behaviour. I wish they would also mimic some elements from X Windows, such as tab-left click anywhere to grab and move a window and alt-right click anywhere to resize a window. Sloppy mouse focus, multiple desktops … the list goes on. The resize a window trick by shaking, slamming it into the side of the screen …. a lame beginning !!

    • Ruiner
    • 11 years ago

    Back to back benchmarks vs. xp sp3 would be nice.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 11 years ago

    I put the 64-bit beta on an empty partition on my ThinkPad T61 the other night.

    The jury’s still out IMO, but it is one of the most stable betas I’ve ever seen. All Vista-64 drivers have worked great, including the fingerprint-reader, so that’s all good, and all 32-bit apps I’ve installed have been smooth too. Streaming media has also appeared to be smoother in playback from some sites compared to XP, but that could just be me (note: I’m not bandwidth-limited, I have a 16 down/2 up connection).

    • PRIME1
    • 11 years ago

    WTB/WTT Windows 7 (64-bit) compatible NIC

    • PeterD
    • 11 years ago

    I wander….
    Suppose that car makers would place the gas pedal at the other side of the pedals…
    Would you appreciate that?
    Or the gearshift at the other side.
    Would you like that?
    But that’s what MS is doing again and again, only to give you the idea you have something *new* and *interesting*.

      • Scrotos
      • 11 years ago

      Well, my workplace is holding off going to Vista because it’s not yet compatible with our vendors (or, I should say, vice-versa). We were excited about Windows 7 because our vendors will probably have their crap together for Vista by the time W7 comes out, so we could just jump to that.

      However, we’ve trained our users to use the windows classic theme as most of our systems still deploy Win2K (migrating to WinXP now, slowly). The fact that there’s no option in W7 to have the start menu revert to the old way is probably going to drive us to Vista or force us to build some entirely custom solution for our users. Kinda sad, but our users are dumb as bricks and the more the OS “helps” them the harder it makes our job in IT. W7 is a huge step backward from what I’ve seen and played with so far in that regard. Don’t get me wrong, as a user I’m enthused, but from the perspective of supporting my users this seems to be a nightmare. Going from a P3 733MHz system with Win2K to a Core2 Duo 3 GHz system with WinXP’s classic theme, a user complained that the new system was too slow and she wanted her old system back because it was faster. So, we obliged. But… that’s the kind of crap I have to deal with and it’s not a company where IT makes the rules, it’s the type of company where IT has to bend over backwards to accomodate users.

        • PaulTheSysdmin
        • 11 years ago

        I’m almost certain that you can switch to classic mode in Windows 7, I believe I saw the option the other night. I’ll check when I get home though.

        • jstern
        • 11 years ago

        WoW, she preferred the 733 P3 over the 3Ghz Core 2 Duo because she felt it was faster. That annoys me. I’m annoyed.

      • IntelMole
      • 11 years ago

      Those seatbelts were probably a bad idea too.

      But whilst we’re making silly comparisons, tell me which part of the new windows 7 experience is life-threatening.

        • indeego
        • 11 years ago

        The part that costs your company money in the long run because you are training users to do stupid gee-whiz things that don’t raise actual productivityg{<.<}g

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 11 years ago

          I disagree about the productivity. Finding programs on Vista is so nice. You hit start and then start typing. The same is true for finding files. Office 2007 brings productivity up alot by making it easier to access functions and the auto-preview of formatting and stuff makes it much faster to apply the style you want.
          The other side is that Vista is easier to deploy and maintain from an administrative side, so that’s good news there.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 11 years ago

      Car companies have experimented with moving the shifter around. Behind the steering wheel, on the floor, and paddle shifters.

        • slash3
        • 11 years ago

        Also dashboard push-button gear selection along with the obvious left-hand swap for certain regions (UK, Australia, Japan, etc). Some old cars had multiple gear shift levers and pedals. Then there’s sequential shifting and double clutching and on and on.

        Not really directed at you specifically, but sometimes change is good. The determining factors are the how and why of it.

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 11 years ago

    The thing I’ve been really impressed with is how seamlessly the 32 bit and 64 bit stuff blends. Granted I didn’t use Vista before, but it seems to me that making 64 bit this easy to use means that the day where 64 bit computing is ubiquitous is almost here.

    • PaulTheSysdmin
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve been really impressed with the experience I have had with Windows 7. I have been running Windows Vista Ultimate 32-bit for about a year, I will concede that originally there were some annoyances, that have since been resolved. Regardless, being the gamer that I am, I’ve been more or less content with Vista as my primary OS.

    What really impressed me about this Windows 7 beta launch was how seamless the transition was from Vista in setting up a dual boot to it. With Windows Vista’s own disk management utility I took one of my active partitions with free space and created a new partition. I rebooted/ booted from the dvd selected my partition and the 64 bit install and within less then a half hour I had a dual boot of Windows 7 and Windows Vista.

    There was no need for partition magic or any third party software to set it up.

    I have been planning to rebuild my system to be running 64 bit as opposed to 32. Originally I had planned to do the upgrade this month with Windows Vista, however having tried the Windows 7 beta I now plan to wait for its release and rebuild with one of its 64 bit iterations.

    • jstern
    • 11 years ago

    I strongly disagree about the new task bar. It feels less cluttery, and I find that if you have a lot of windows open, it’s much faster clicking lets say on the firefox icon and picking the window you want, than scanning through all the clutter to find the window that you want.

      • tesla120
      • 11 years ago

      i agree, the only thing i would like to see is the thumbnails popping up in a more timely fashion ie: OSX dock’s magnification fast you mouse across the things in the windows dock and those thumbnails should scroll across just as fast minimizing lag but maximizing the look and organization of the dock.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 11 years ago

    Cyril, did you upgrade Windows or install fresh? I couldn’t boot from the DVD on my iMac, and just wondering if anyone else could.

      • Cyril
      • 11 years ago

      I made a new partition with Boot Camp and installed fresh.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        and it booted from teh DVD? The 64-bit DVD freaked out on me – gave me “select your CD boot method” with two choices, named “1.” and “2.” , and hte keyboard wasn’t recognized so I couldn’t get any farther.

          • Cyril
          • 11 years ago

          Yeah, it booted off the DVD just fine for me. Maybe your download was corrupted?

            • End User
            • 11 years ago

            Are you using x86 or x64?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            x64 on a Penryn iMac with the Radeon 2600

          • End User
          • 11 years ago

          Tried to install the x64 version on my MBP via Boot Camp. I got that CD boot message to appear as well. I am going to try the x86 version tonight.

            • Kurlon
            • 11 years ago

            Which MBP do you have? The first gen aren’t 64bit capable as they’ve only got Core Duos, not Core2 Duos. When I try to use the x64 dvd on my Core Duo MBP I get the same boot menu/hang.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            That makes sense, but my iMac is a Penryn model, defintiely 64-bit capable.

            Maybe it’s the boot loader on the DVD isn’t Mac-compatible. I might download the 32-bit and try again.

            • End User
            • 11 years ago

            Core 2 Duo which is x64. I’m off to try installing 7 again.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            Booted correctly from the x86 DVD and installed over the top. Figured I might as well, considering I took the time to download. Not like my 3GB of memory will benefit from 64-bit Windows.

            • End User
            • 11 years ago

            x86 worked for me.

            Apple’s supplied drivers worked but I updated the audio drivers and installed the 8.12 drivers from AMD/ATI. Installed FF3, VLC and Team Fortress 2 (gaming is the only reason I use Windows at home). No issues so far. Browsing a LAN is much faster now.

            Overall a nice refresh of Vista (Vista Second Edition). This is what Vista should have been when it came out.

    • Fighterpilot
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve been using W7 for a week I guess and think its a class above Vista.
    All you XP users have a nice chance to try a flash 3D ish desktop and if you can, get 64 bit which is so sweet.
    A brand new operating system to play with until August…and its free.
    Props to MS for it.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      what, exactly, is three-dimensional about the interface? Can I hide icons beneath other icons so I can lose them, just like on my real desk?

      The 3D interface concept is soooooo not what I want. Apple proved it with Stacks.

    • kilkennycat
    • 11 years ago

    l[

      • Krogoth
      • 11 years ago

      100% backwards compatibility is going not to happen. It is a completely unrealistic goal.

      Vista change everything from ground up. 7 is no expectation either. The same crap happened with legacy DOS-era applications that refuse to run properly on NT.

      It is not much different on the *nix front. Try to run some ancient *nix applications on modern kernels. At least, OSS community attempts to recode and update some of those old applications to run on modern kernels.

      Upgrading does not only involve the hardware aspect it is also the same deal on the software front. It is the nature of beast.

      IT department is the last thing that companies worry about in a recession.

      • Philldoe
      • 11 years ago

      Welcome to life, every OS is like this.

      Every time an OS line goes through a set of major changes, it’s done to make the line of products better, if the goverment and businesses don’t have the means to upgrade their system then they don’t plain and simple. No biggie, they just keep using the old stuff.

      Just seems odd to complain about it. MS isn’t complaining about people using old stuff and it’s cost pohibitive for MS to continue supporting a product that is nearing a decade in age and just old.

      Progress, it’s your friend.

      • jstern
      • 11 years ago

      Get a virtual machine with XP

        • kilkennycat
        • 11 years ago

        You may have noticed that virtual machines do not work with many peripheral hardware drivers. Anyway an XP virtual machine needs a XP license. Stand-alone XP has been officially discontinued.by Microsoft …. Next…..

          • jstern
          • 11 years ago

          The copy of XP that I have for virtual machine was an evaluation copy that for some reason never expired. It tends to run better on VM than XP on my non core 2 duo machines. I mainly use it for if I want to try out a program before installing it on Vista. Let me just say that for me Vista is a time saver.

      • End User
      • 11 years ago

      The wake up call was two years ago when Vista shipped. If businesses/consumers are complaining about backwards compatibility issues now then they only have themselves to blame. If your software/hardware company has not yet released Vista compatible products then I would dump them ASAP and look for another solution (or forever run XP and keep quiet about it).

        • kilkennycat
        • 11 years ago

        l[

          • Kurlon
          • 11 years ago

          Yeah, ’cause OS X is a paragon of backwards compatibility… Each point release, and a slug of apps stop working. 10.0 to 10.1, some breakage. Move to 10.2, big breakage. Move to 10.3, big breakage. Move to 10.4, more big breakage. 10.5 didn’t see to break as much, although a ton of apps still have offer different builds for 10.4 vs 10.5…

          • End User
          • 11 years ago

          l[

            • Sargent Duck
            • 11 years ago

            I just recently dealt with a client using Windows 2000…

          • Krogoth
          • 11 years ago

          You had this epiphany recently?

          It is about time. It seems like you need to grab some morning coffee and wake up to the world of commercial software!

    • fpsduck
    • 11 years ago

    /off topic

    Wow! I just know that you are Van Halen fan.
    But I stop buying VH after 5150.

      • Scrotos
      • 11 years ago

      Van Halen! Woooo!

      So you’re not even a Diamond Dave fan, you just arbitrarily stop after 5150? Kinda odd. If you liked that, you probably would have liked the next 3.

    • Ricardo Dawkins
    • 11 years ago

    You dont like the new taskbar…do as I did when first upgraded to Windows XP coming from Windows 98/2000. Use the Classic mode. Period.

    Later.

      • DrDillyBar
      • 11 years ago

      I do this too.

    • grantmeaname
    • 11 years ago

    I wish I could get Mojave instead… 90% of everyone was fascinated by it!

      • NeronetFi
      • 11 years ago

      My first laugh for the day. Thank you 🙂

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      sure, everyone looked at Vista and said “ooh, pretty”. nothing new about that, it’s about as attractive as a UI can get. No big surprise there. Use it for 5 minutes and you’ll feel the same way. It’s once you look past the ooh shiny that some people revolt.

    • Krogoth
    • 11 years ago

    Windows 7 beta feels like a beta version of Vista SP2 with a different UI.

    I bet that MS is getting excited about the vast demand that public has shown. Maybe, it is another marketing move like Coke-cola co. did with reintroduction of the old formula under Coke Classic name.

      • indeego
      • 11 years ago

      Classic coke won. So would XP see an even bigger resurgenceg{

        • Krogoth
        • 11 years ago

        Well, the public and some Vista-haters seemed to think “7” is going to be next XP. 😉

    • ucisilentbob
    • 11 years ago

    Windows Media Center 7 really feels sluggish in comparision to Vista Media Center. Otherwise, after a day of trying to get used to the new “superbar” i went right back to the Window based taskbar.

    One thing i noticed that is pretty cool is that Windows Media Center 7 transcodes files directly to my Xbox360. Microsoft just took another step ahead of the PS3 in terms of media management on the console. I love both my PS3 and the Xbox360, but if the PS3 had the same media management of the xbox (no, i’m not interested in TVersity) then i’d use my xbox360 alot less. Oh, last comment about Media Center 7, Why did they get rid of the skip buttons? I find the fast forward and backwards buttons alot less useful than the skip forward and skip backwards buttons.

    Back to Windows 7 in general, I dont see any real reason to pay for Windows 7 if you’re already on Vista. I’m saddened that x64 is not the default install too. Then again, Windows 7 wasn’t really meant for the Vista users. It’s for all those who were to stubborn to appreciate Vista for what it did do.

    • Tamale
    • 11 years ago

    I agree completely about the taskbar, cyril.. just make sure a single click brings all the windows up by default, while a hover displays the open windows as ‘tabs’ like a click currently does.

    • Philldoe
    • 11 years ago

    Sounds to me like MS made Vista and Mac OS have a love child. Guess I’ll be skipping Win7, too many things sound too far off from what I want, but I’m going to atleast give it a try next week.

    EDIT:Typos

      • dmitriylm
      • 11 years ago

      Isn’t it more like Vista and OSX had a love child to form Win 7?

        • Philldoe
        • 11 years ago

        Err… yeah, I fail today =/

      • Krogoth
      • 11 years ago

      No, it is like more like MS went back that refine and added in what “Longhorn” originally promised.

      It is the same thing that had happened with Windows 95 => Windows 98. The latter version was a refinement of the predecessor and incorporated some sorely needed fixes and updates.

        • Philldoe
        • 11 years ago

        I dunno, I’m not a big fan of the icon per app on the task bar thing. That is a big nogo for me. I rather love Vista’s page flipping and taskbar, there is nothing I’d change about Vistas task bar.

    • shiznit
    • 11 years ago

    this is already the best OS I have ever used, period.

    before you linux fans jump in, i’m a gamer so don’t bother.

      • dmitriylm
      • 11 years ago

      I’ll jump on that bandwagon. It’s incredibly brisk and polished as a beta with plenty of eye candy to boot. I’m running this on an HP 2133 (Via C7M 1.7Ghz) netbook.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 11 years ago

    The taskbar could be fixed by finishing the Apple/NeXT copy job – click an icon, all windows for that app come up with whichever one was in front when you switched continuing to be the frontmost app. Seems like an easy fix, and I submitted it via feedback.

    I also think that windows, when you drag them to the sides, should widen/shrink to fit whatever is on the screen (and if the window can shrink too much, put a minimum width of say 30% of the screen to keep readable) and only wide enough to view the doc. This is useless in Word as it stands; on my 1680×1050 display, Word doesn’t stay wide enough to prevent horizontal scrolling and it’s irritating as hell. I don’t mind if they overlap; I want to prevent horizontal scrolling where it’s otherwise unnecessary. We read left to right (or in some cultures, right to left) and not top to bottom for a reason.

    The libraries should include your downloads folder – there’s no way to get to Downloads without going up two levels and then opening the folder. That’s a pain.

    EVERYTHING I’ve found has been submitted via feedback. Windows 7 is a huge improvement, but Explorer (and by extension the Start menu and the task bar) are lacking a little bit of vision. The question it’s answering doesn’t seem to be “how can this be done better for the most people.”

    • DrDillyBar
    • 11 years ago

    l[

    • indeego
    • 11 years ago

    Started off somewhat impressed, but I think that was partly due to having a new build on my machine after almost 2 years of the same machine. went downhill with about two days of light use. Today the taskbar on 7 hung up on me, and I found myself unable to alt+tab or navigate over to use another rdp window in progress. I went to use the start menu and it was hung completely, I couldn’t browse beyond the initial 5 programs installed.

    The fewer UAC prompts was welcome. Otherwise I didn’t see much difference from Vista. Windows Media Player had 6 icons alone within the program that just glancing at them without hovering, I had no idea what they would do.

    Definitely beta stuff hereg{<.<}g Back to Vista.

    • leor
    • 11 years ago

    l[

      • dmitriylm
      • 11 years ago

      But the trick here is that all the Vista haters will suddenly fall in love with Windows 7 even though nothing drastic has changed. I can’t believe how many “OMG I love it, finally a reason to upgrade from XP!” responses I’ve read from clueless people. As someone who has used Vista from release to its current state, I can say that although Windows 7 is nice (even in Beta form it runs like a champ) it doesn’t feel all that different from Vista (which isn’t really a bad thing).

        • shiznit
        • 11 years ago

        agreed. vista after sp1 and after gpu drivers stabilized became the best operating system to date. Win7 is even better.

          • Meadows
          • 11 years ago

          This man speaks the truth.

          • henfactor
          • 11 years ago

          You forgot about OSX 😉

            • Bombadil
            • 11 years ago

            IMHO, OSX is one of the worst.

        • Mithent
        • 11 years ago

        Agreed, I’ve seen the same thing from many people who “hated” Vista but “love” 7, which as a Vista user I really can’t understand. When challenged, these people inevitably either say that they can’t explain it, or that the performance is somehow now amazing (improved maybe, but it’s not really that much better on any acceptable hardware).

      • FroBozz_Inc
      • 11 years ago

      I think MS would behoove themselves by recognizing that they goal is to get as many ppl as possible to move to Win7. Vista didn’t do all that great in terms of people wanting to upgrade to it. The smart thing for them to do would be to offer Win7 upgrades from Vista at a substantially reduced price compared to Vista’s pricing. $400 is obscene.

      I’m thinking like $70 for a Vista to Win7 upgrade.

      It would sell like hotcakes.

      • Corrado
      • 11 years ago

      Kinda like Apple does with their ‘service packs’. Do you really think that Windows 7 offers less over Vista than 10.4 did over 10.3? Sure 10.0 -> 10.5 is a night and day difference just like going from Win2K -> Windows 7 would be, but yeah, I digress.

      Apple gets $100 from you 3 times for the same ammount of improvement you pay MS $300 for every 3 years. Its 6 in one hand and half dozen in another.

    • adisor19
    • 11 years ago

    I’ve been playing with it too in Fusion and i must say it’s less of a dog on resources as compared to Vista. And, wow, the booting and shutting down time has been drastically reduced. GG MS, GG.

    Color me impressed so far. This is the feeling i should have gotten when i first tried Vista a few years ago and this is just a BETA, not even close to the final release.

    Adi

      • Krogoth
      • 11 years ago

      The boot-up and shutdown time is about the same speed as a “virgin” installation of Vista SP1 here. I always thought it was totally depended on how many services and programs the OS has to properly close and doing the occasional critical updates.

        • tesla120
        • 11 years ago

        really? boot time is dependent on how much has to boot? wow…

        to side with seven, I have been using seven for probably a month now only reinstalling the new build when it was released a few days ago. even with all my random stuff installed the speeds were still comparable to my XP machine (haven’t used vista since RC2)

        • Meadows
        • 11 years ago

        Wrong.

          • Krogoth
          • 11 years ago

          O Rly?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 11 years ago

      nobody shuts down their machines anymore. The only “boot” speed I’m interested in is resume from hibernation, and since that’s basically just streaming data from the HDD to RAM, it won’t change much unless you add more RAM or get a faster HDD.

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 11 years ago

        I shut my work laptop down every single day. It only takes about 30 seconds, and about the same on boot-up in the morning. That way I know the encryption is done right and I get a clean slate in the morning.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 11 years ago

          Wasting a good chunk of my morning installing updates is not the way to be productive. I actually have work to do when I arrive; I can’t sit around and wait for a boot-up and wait for updates to install after that. Even if it’s only 20 minutes, it’s already put me behind. Auto-updates are the only way to fly.

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 11 years ago

            Who said anything about updates? It takes about 45 seconds to boot, which is long enough for me to put by bag and my lunch up, as well as turn on my desk light, flip the next page of the page-a-day calendar. Actually, once it gets to the log-in screen, I swipe my finger to log-in and I usually still have a little bit of settling to do. I don’t see the problem.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 11 years ago

            Well if you never update your machine, you wouldn’t have one.

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