Thermaltake website leaves me dazed and confused

The marketing of enthusiast-class PC hardware tends to be all over the map, from extreme branding that targets overcaffeinated gamers to stodgy corporate attempts at hipster relevance that rarely hit the mark. And, of course, there are the bizarre foreign imports that tend to lose something in translation. Take the latest graphic running on Thermaltake’s website, for example:

Apparently, Thermaltake thinks this image invokes excitement. Never mind that raising your hands in imaginary victory on an empty and quiet country road is perhaps the least exciting thing you can do on a bike. Or in spandex.

Even more perplexing is the fact that Thermaltake seems to think that cycling will resonate with its core audience. You know, because nothing says PC enthusiast like physical activity, being outside, wearing skin-tight clothing, and men shaving their legs. And I say this as an avid cyclist with six bikes, a wardrobe filled with lycra, and more hair on my face than on my quads.

The next frame is rather appropriate, since I find this graphic truly fascinating. But nothing compares to the money shot:

Keep constantly high? Seriously?

I can only suspect that Thermaltake has leveraged its expertise with water-cooling kits to build some sort of ultimate bong. After all, the use of mind-altering substances would easily explain the company’s latest enclosure concept. And I mean that in a good way.

Perhaps Thermaltake is simply trying to broaden its audience to include doped up cyclists. As a bike geek living in Vancouver, Canada—the home of BC Bud—I thoroughly approve. Although I’m still confused.

Comments closed
    • OneArmedScissor
    • 11 years ago

    Thank you. I laughed.

    It’s understandable that many people making decisions in computer-related companies may not have English as a first language. But nonetheless, I am always baffled by how many things are lost in translation when you go to the specific United States or North America part of many websites, or even in their advertisements on other websites, and of all things, descriptions on the actual retail packaging.

    Right now I am looking at a box that says:

    “ECS Heat Shield series is equipped with two copper tubes which has the excellent heat conductivity.”

    There are plenty of other bizarre grammatical errors. This is supposed to convince me to buy this if I don’t know what it is? lolwtfbbq?!?

    They’re bound to have SOME people working over there that should see that stuff, and stop to ask someone what’s going on.

    • glynor
    • 11 years ago

    This is awesome, Geoff. Good find.

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 11 years ago

    If you want to see stuff better then this, then you have to actually travel to Asia. When I was in China I saw some of the funniest phrases and “sentences” that I’ve ever seen.

    At a national park there was a sign that said “Take care of the young and the olds”. There was also a sign telling you not to pick flowers, but it used the phrasing, “flower and grass smils [sic] sweetly, looking at you from nature.”

    The funniest things I saw were written on clothing where random English words like “love”, “cool”, and “Mickey Mouse” were strung together into strange phrases. I saw one young lady wearing a shirt that said “Caucasian Style”.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 11 years ago

      Sounds no worse than clothing we have in the US with random Chinese characters the meaning of which the owner doesn’t know. I wonder if someone travelling from there to here would find those funny?

        • VaultDweller
        • 11 years ago

        My thoughts exactly.

        People make fun of “Engrish” all the time, but at least they have some vague concept of what the words mean (just not a good enough concept to use them properly). That puts them a few leagues above people that get tattoos of random Chinese symbols.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 11 years ago

          We can thank England in the past and now the internet for English being a somewhat universal langage.

            • TurtlePerson2
            • 11 years ago

            As I recall, England didn’t have too much to do with it. I’m pretty sure that French was the language of international communication until the 19th century.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 11 years ago

            So until 1800? Obviously French colonies spoke french, and probably also English, and vice versa. There is Spanish too but the areas that were Spanish haven’t had a real run at being large economic or world powers yet. I’m not talking about official governement diplomatic language but rather the language of business. So yeah, like I said…

            • titan
            • 11 years ago

            The language of business is the lingua franca, French Language is what it translates to. English is now the lingua franca, as anecdotal evidence will point out and the fact that there are far more people of foreign languages who can speak English than there are English speakers who can speak a foreign language, based upon a percentage of the educated population.

            The official language of government is Latin. It was believed that the more confusing a sentence was spoken, the more intelligent it was; the harder the listener or reader had to think about what they heard or read showed how incredibly intelligent the author is. So…enough said. (^_^)

            • Meadows
            • 11 years ago

            That must explain nVidia’s branding.

            • Dashak
            • 11 years ago

            Meadows with the slam.

            • TurtlePerson2
            • 10 years ago

            Latin is a very clear language. Meaning isn’t conveyed by word location, which can be advantageous when writing a document. It can be difficult to read, but it only ever means one thing.

    • xii
    • 11 years ago

    It might be something along the lines of lost in translation and cultural differences. Some commercial slogans seem to be created in other languages where the words and/or sentiment don’t translate well into English.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 11 years ago

    I don’t understand the confusion, Geoff, this ad is tailor-fit to your likes:

    -Biking

    -Getting High. (cause you’re Canadian)

    If anything, if I were you I’d be creeped out by how well they know you (or your demograph).

      • Meadows
      • 11 years ago

      But does his demograph shave their legs on average?

        • derFunkenstein
        • 11 years ago

        Sure seems that way, just based on what he wrote…

        l[

    • Alabama_Enigma
    • 11 years ago

    Reminds me of Asus.

    “Rock Solid, Heart Touching”

    Heart Touching?? WTF?

      • Meadows
      • 11 years ago

      At least it isn’t “ball touching”.

        • xzelence
        • 11 years ago

        BALL TOUCHING, HAHAHA.

        But they’ve actually changed (or are in the process of changing) that slogan. I saw a picture from CeBIT saying:

        ASUS
        Inspiring Innovation. Pursuing Perfection. (or something very close to that.)

        Unfortunately that is coherent and catchy (alliteration). Looks like no more ball touching, hahaha.

          • Meadows
          • 11 years ago

          /[

      • kcarlile
      • 11 years ago

      Yeah, that one pretty much makes me not want to buy ASUS stuff.

        • indeego
        • 11 years ago

        Is a shame, because asus makes quality stuffg{<.<}g

          • kcarlile
          • 11 years ago

          Didn’t say I wasn’t… my last two video cards were ASUS. I just hate the slogan. A lot.

    • Meadows
    • 11 years ago

    I hope the last image is not referring to temperatures.

      • DrDillyBar
      • 11 years ago

      But what could they possibly mean? High CPU speed? The price of their products? The euphoria from owning their stuff maybe? I’m at a loss.

        • Meadows
        • 11 years ago

        Judging by the picture, euphoria.

    • DrDillyBar
    • 11 years ago

    Yeah, I interpreted that banner much the same way you did when I saw it just now.
    They could at least have the cyclist move a bit as the frames progress.

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