An upgrade tale 2: upgrade harder

So, almost three years had passed since my last major system upgrade—downright shameful negligence for someone in this line of work, clearly. I won’t rant about diminishing returns all over again (that was last month’s topic), but suffice it to say I remained largely satisfied with my Core 2 Duo E6400 throughout that length of time. The more time passed, the more I became resigned to stick with my old parts until something major came along, something that would really justify spending an afternoon gutting my computer, cutting my hands on sharp case edges, and trying to get screws out from underneath my motherboard.

That something finally came on September 8. I had contemplated Intel’s Core i7-900 processors for some time, but I wasn’t particularly thrilled about the prospect of blowing almost $500—or, in my case, €500—on a processor and motherboard, and then having to pay a further premium for one of them fancy triple-channel RAM thingamajigs. Via Lynnfield, Intel brought the Nehalem architecture to a price point I found much harder to resist.

Not only that, but in my diminishing returns post, I clamored about my wish for more power-efficient parts. The new platform fulfills that requirement in my eyes, with remarkably low idle power consumption that puts even previous dual-core offerings to shame. Then there’s Turbo Boost, which can clock up individual cores by as much as two thirds of a gigahertz depending on load. It’s like having your cake and eating it, too. You get a blistering-fast quad-core processor, excellent single-threaded performance, and really low idle power draw.

I gave in. On September 9, I ordered the following parts from local e-tailer Materiel.net:

That processor and motherboard combo would go on to become the cornerstone of our fall system guide’s Utility Player build. As for me, I decided to combine the aforementioned with the following from my former build:

  • One Zotac GeForce 8800 GT graphics card (with a custom Zalman cooler)
  • One Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeGamer sound card
  • Two 320GB Western Digital Caviar SE16s (in RAID-1 mode) and one 1TB Caviar Green
  • One Samsung SH-W163A DVD burner
  • One Seasonic S12 430W power supply
  • One Antec P180 enclosure
  • Some fans

I already had a large Thermalright SI-128 heatsink on my Core 2 Duo, but the lack of a readily available LGA1156 mounting kit prompted me to grab the Hyper 212 Plus from Cooler Master—one of the few Core i5-compatible coolers available at launch. Despite its relatively low price, the 212 turned out to be very decent: it takes up to two 120-mm fans and features a convenient tower-style design, a variable-speed fan, and a great multi-socket mounting mechanism that bolts securely through the motherboard.

With a 120-mm Nexus fan doing a constant 1,000 RPM, the 212 keeps my Core i5-750 at around 35-37­°C when idle and 61-62°C after a 15-minute Prime95 torture test. I’d probably get lower load temps with the bundled, variable-speed Cooler Master fan, but consistently low noise levels are my main priority. (Hey, I practically live in front of this system. Give me a break.) I left the disturbingly puny Intel heatsink in its box for the same reason.

Well, that’s not strictly true; I did take it out for a comparison photo next to the Hyper 212 Plus. Yeah, Intel is totally skimping on stock heatsinks these days. Look at that thing! Even the cooler that came with my 65W Core 2 Duo is at least twice as thick.

Here’s everything securely bolted and fastened in preparation for the Great Platform Swap. That operation was surprisingly uneventful, taking about an hour and a half in total and eliciting no cursing on my part. I can thank Antec’s cleverly designed P180 for the lack of cursing, although the enclosure also made me spend an inordinate amount of time on cable management. Yes, I have the old version of the case that doesn’t let you run cables behind the motherboard. I’d probably upgrade if I opened it more frequently.

My motherboard choice probably deserves some attention, too. I believe I’ve covered all the bases in the latest system guide’s Utility Player section, so I won’t regurgitate it all here. In a nutshell, though, I like the GA-P55-UD3R’s relatively low price, its abundance of SATA and USB ports, and the little touches like dual BIOS chips, all-solid-state caps, eight-phase CPU power, and Dynamic Energy Saver software. My only gripe is the presence of only two PCIe slots aside from the main graphics one. Since I use a dual-slot graphics card, however, I’m really no worse off than if I’d gotten, say, Asus’ P7P55D LE or P7P55D.

With the hardware swap complete, I attempted to boot into Windows 7 using just one of the drives from my RAID 1. Predictably, Windows 7 threw up a blue screen of death during the startup sequence. I expected this, and I was ready to reinstall when I came to a realization: I’d forgotten to set the Serial ATA controller to RAID mode in the BIOS. It was still in IDE mode, and my Windows 7 installation didn’t have the right drivers for that. I made the change in the BIOS, and much to my surprise, Windows 7 booted up without a hitch; it just spent a while re-detecting all my hardware afterward.

Better yet, the P55 PCH’s storage controller knew my hard drive was part of a RAID config, and once I plugged in the other drive, it happily started rebuilding the array via the Windows software. Switching from one Intel chipset to another isn’t exactly pushing the envelope, but I still appreciate when things just work like that.

The next little while was spent trying to get Internet access. After a driver update and several reboots, I finally remembered about the MAC address filtering on my router. Apparently, switching to a completely different motherboard with a different Ethernet controller also change your MAC address, even if you keep the same enclosure. Who knew?

Everything was soon in order, and I happily ran a few games and applications to gauge the performance increase. Oh, it was noticeable. Photoshop never loaded up so fast, and even web browsing felt snappier, especially in JavaScript-heavy sites. While all of this was going on, I noticed my hard drives were making more noise than usual.

A lot more noise. Except it wasn’t coming from the hard drives.

Turns out, somehow, simple tasks like scrolling and dragging my mouse across a web page caused a high-pitched screeching noise to emanate from the power supply. Switching to Windows 7’s “Power saver” power management scheme made the noise go away, but it also made the system feel a little sluggish. (Clock speeds rarely went above 2GHz, according to CPU-Z.) Switching to the “High performance” scheme made the screeching constant. A Google search revealed other users with similar problems. Some blamed it on their motherboards, others tried switching motherboards with no success, and one guy was unable to get rid of the noise even with different motherboards and different power supplies from different vendors. That didn’t bode well.

I still decided to get a new PSU. Something inside there, probably a coil, was generating the noise after all, right? I’d been meaning to decommission the ol’ S12 for a while, anyway—it had only two SATA power connectors and no PCIe power connectors at all, and I was sick of cluttering my case with more and more plug adapters. So, I shopped around and soon came across Corsair’s HX450W. That unit isn’t actually available in the U.S. for some reason, but it ticked all the right boxes for me: 80 Plus Bronze certification, modular cabling system, seven-year warranty, and a relatively low price. I got mine for around €67, a good €20 less than the HX520W, which has lower efficiency and a shorter warranty.

I switched out the S12 for the HX450W last weekend, spending another 30 minutes or so making sure all the cables were neat and tidy. Well, at least as tidy as you can get ’em in a first-gen P180. Happily, though, the noise was gone. The other Seasonic unit still works just fine with my Core 2 parts, which I’ve since transferred to my fiancee’s PC, so I’m gonna chalk up the screeching noise to the S12’s age. I mean, that thing came out before Intel’s first quad-core CPU. Maybe its response to the state-of-the-art Nehalem chip with Turbo Boost and madly fluctuating voltages was PSU talk for, “Get off my lawn!”

But I digress. This adventure has left me with a very quick, power-efficient, and tidy PC. I dig the modular power cables, and they really make sense in an enclosure like this one. The Core i5-750 is a fantastic processor, and watching Turbo Boost kick in still makes me giddy. Part of me regrets not going with the i7-860, since it’d be really cool to see eight little activity graphs in the Task Manager instead of four, but the i5 is more than fast enough for my needs.

One component remains in need of an upgrade: that GeForce 8800 GT. With mid-range DirectX 11 cards so close to release, I’ve decided to hold off until AMD’s Juniper cards… or maybe I’ll get tired of waiting and spring for a Radeon HD 5850, who knows?

I’d rather not spend more than I have to, though. My primary gaming display has a pretty sane 1920×1200 resolution, and I only play games a few hours a week (if that). Besides, as I said last month, the vast majority of console ports and cross-platform titles already run great on the 8800 GT. I want my next graphics card to be faster, yes, but I also want it to be power-efficient and relatively cheap. Hopefully, Juniper will fulfill those requirements. If not, well, I might just sit this one out and see what Nvidia comes up with.

Comments closed
    • Left_SHifted
    • 10 years ago

    A reasonable amount of time has passed, after the launching of both cypress and juniper, and no one has asked the million dollar question yet…(well okay, a few hundred euros,but you get the drift), which directx 11 card have you bought, cyril?

    It would be nice if you did an upgrade tale v2.1:upgrade eye candy!!

    • ADRENALIN
    • 10 years ago

    i have a Intel C2D E6400 @3.00GHz With, MSI P35 Neo2-FR, 4GB RAM, GeForce 9600 GT. Im thinking about upgrading to a Core i5-750 or Core i7-860 this december.

    i am very happy with the 3 years ive gotten out of my pc.

    • Fastidious
    • 10 years ago

    I’m wondering when I’ll feel similar. I’m rocking 4gb, Q6600, and a GF8800 GTS. I used to OC my CPU to 3.42ghz but then I figured what’s the point since it does offer extra performance but I don’t need it. Most of the time it runs underclocked anyways. I’d rather save on power.

    Only a couple games make my system chop a bit FPS wise, and frankly I can either turn down the resolution from my 1920*1200 default or settings and barely notice much visual loss of quality. For the same reason I rarely run anti-aliasing since I can’t tell if it is on at high resolution.

    • thermistor
    • 10 years ago

    Oddly enough, I was considering turning on MAC address filtering…

    I have two old dlink media extenders that only do WEP, no WP2A or anything else, so I feel insecure.

    Tip to add MAC from wired devices from a blog unrelated to networking…I love it!

    • oldDummy
    • 10 years ago

    As a hardware nut this is what I miss, a little.
    The varied and multiple options with parts that could be one’s life work by themselves [to be fully understood on a fundamental level].
    Interesting and great fun.
    .
    While this could be done within the scope of a SFF footprint the cumulative parts buildup and storage are, to me, deal breakers.

    Good luck with your new build.

    • lycium
    • 10 years ago

    dude cyril, you’re the best thing to happen to TR in a while 🙂 i agee 100% about cutting oneself silly and stressing about removing heatsinks and stuff like that… hardware is nice to read about, but a pain to install!

    i’ve been running an i7 920 since november last year with the stock intel HSF, and only last week or so did i discover that it had been running at 100+ degrees (celsius) when fully loaded… it’d been running like that for several days at a time doing 3d rendering! i’m amazed it’s survived actually.

    edit: i’ve also noticed that crazy high pitched screeching, and funny enough when i drop the voltage up or down 1% it almost completely goes away.

    • nanoflower
    • 10 years ago

    What’s the weight of that heat sink? One thing that’s always concerned me about the huge heat sinks is the weight when they are put into a tower enclosure since all of that weight is pulling down on the motherboard. I’m sure it will work up front but what happens in a year or two? Will the strain cause problems or are the motherboards designed to handle it.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 10 years ago

      That’s why you get one with a backplate. It’s still hanging off the motherboard but it’s distributed across a larger area plus it doesn’t warp the mobo like push pins.

    • Voldenuit
    • 10 years ago

    Congrats Cyril!

    FWIW, I have a Gigabyte EP45-UD3P, and it gave a *lot* of feedback noise into the sound system whenever the hard drives were seeking (and also intermittently). Even changing to a discrete sound card (a PCIE Sound Blaster X-Fi Ti) reproduced the same problem.

    Eventually, I managed to get rid of the problem (or so I thought) by swapping out the Corsair TX650W PSU for a Cooler Master Silent Pro M 700W.

    Even then, the problem reappears (though not quite as bad) when I turn on Gigabyte’s Dynamic Energy Saver utility.

    Based on my experience (and the sheer number of forum posts afflicting Gigabyte users), I’m going to pin this on Gigabyte. For some reason, their motherboards seem quite susceptible to either generating or feeding through electrical noise. Powering my system through a(n admittedly low end) voltage regulator didn’t seem to help, perhaps a UPS might, but I don’t have one handy. In the mean time, I just disable DES, although my headphone jacks are still noisier than I’d like at idle. -_-

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 10 years ago

      Yea, and FWIW – Part II, I have the ASUS P45 Deluxe and the loudest noise is from the stupid RJ45 connector! I can’t turn it off, so I just turn off my hearing aid, lucky me.

    • indeego
    • 10 years ago

    Why put the MB power on topg{

    • FuturePastNow
    • 10 years ago

    I feel better knowing I’m not the only person who refuses to buy RAM with heatspreaders on it.

      • Meadows
      • 10 years ago

      Why are mere heat-spreaders bad?

        • _Sigma
        • 10 years ago

        Depending on what you’re doing, heat spreaders are a must. When doing serious numerical simulation number crunching, I want some guarantee that
        a) the ram isn’t going to melt itself and
        b) not going to become unstable due to heat and destroy days worth of computations.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 10 years ago

          The question isn’t whether dissipating heat is a good thing but rather how good heatspredaers are at doing it. Some heatsink designs likely bring tangible benefits (Corsair DHX design in particular) but the basic ‘flat metal slab the size of the DIMM attached with thermal tape’ design is questionable. They may serve to trap heat as much as they disspiate it.

            • _Sigma
            • 10 years ago

            Well the value ram heat spreaders are a joke, I’ll agree with you there.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            I wonder if some enterprising nerd has done a comparison, say with a thermal probe next to a chip with the heatspreader on versus off. Cheapo-style heatspreaders seem to be more about branding and hiding the chips from folks who hunt for a certain chip to me.

          • oldDummy
          • 10 years ago

          hahahaha,
          thats a joke..right?

            • _Sigma
            • 10 years ago

            what?
            10char

            • Meadows
            • 10 years ago

            5char

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            4chan

          • indeego
          • 10 years ago

          Then get ECC memory, and build in error correction into your code. The hardware attached to the memory will have nothing to do with creating/causing errors on a properly built system.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 10 years ago

    I can’t wait for part three.

    _[

      • Flying Fox
      • 10 years ago

      When you finally realize how much injustice you are doing to your shiny new system with /[

    • Clint Torres
    • 10 years ago

    Wait a minute. You mean to tell me you were able to switch hard drives from one machine to another and NOT have to reinstall Windows7?

    This is exactly what I want to do. I have a 128GB SSD(G.Skill Falcon, Baby!) in my current rig and I wanted to use it my new i7 860 build but was afraid I’d lose my Win7 license in the process.

    Cyril, did you have to “re-activate” Win7?

      • clhensle
      • 10 years ago

      Back in the XP days, you could (while in windows) put in the XP install disk, then select the “upgrade” option. It would then strip out all the drivers, then reboot, at this point you just kill power, change out the board, and boot it back up. You will have to install all your drivers and service packs, but all your program files are intact. I even tried this on a P4 to Athlon XP swap, worked like a charm. No clue if this works with vista or win7.

        • Clint Torres
        • 10 years ago

        Yeah, I’ve actually had a lot of luck with XP when switching drives “as-is” between systems.

        I tried it in Vista on several occasions with no luck and assumed the same was true for Win7.

        • jokinin
        • 10 years ago

        That is actually a MS utility called Sysprep. But doesn’t work always. I’ve been most successful with a windows live cd with a tool called “offline sysprep”.
        It is very useful to clone windows installations onto different hardware.

        • Meadows
        • 10 years ago

        Back in the Vista days, you did all that without an install disk or an “upgrade” feature, much less any driver reinstalls beyond what becomes necessary.

      • Clint Torres
      • 10 years ago

      Okay, I did it. But it took some work.

      I had 2 machines with Win7 on them. The first drive I tried to put into the new rig would not boot into Win7 BSOD right after Win7 load screen.

      The second drive I unloaded the display driver and transferred the hard drive over and it worked. When it rebooted into windows, it was in 8-bit vga mode and none of the usb devices would work. I let it simmer for a while then rebooted by hitting the power button on the chassis. When it rebooted everything was good. Windows needed to be reactivated but all I had to do is mash the activate button…no re-entering of key required.

        • UberGerbil
        • 10 years ago

        Yes, you should pretty much strip out all the proprietary drivers in favor of the generic Windows ones before attempting a motherboard swap or something of similar magnitude.

        Still, the fact that Windows can recover, adjust, and move on is pretty remarkable. It’s not like this is a usage case that Microsoft even puts any priority on supporting, but it just falls out of all the work that’s been done on plug-and-play and kernel and driver model stability and robustness that’s been going on since NT 4.0.

    • ClickClick5
    • 10 years ago

    AMD continues to cry… 🙁

      • Anvil
      • 10 years ago

      Why would AMD be crying? They’ve got dibs right on probably the most expensive product that’ll be in this build. 🙂

    • UberGerbil
    • 10 years ago

    Reading this brought back memories of Byte Magazine and Jerry Pournelle’s “Chaos Manor” articles where he’d spend several pages (interspersed with screeds about the wonders of “memory-mapped video,” feature suggestions for the BASIC language, and asides about his son’s schoolwork) talking about the contortions necessary to get a 16KB memory add-in board to work.. often culminating in a visit by the founder of the company that made the board, the computer, or both.

      • dpaus
      • 10 years ago

      LOL – I still have all those old Byte mags…

    • anotherengineer
    • 10 years ago

    I did the same thing, forgot about mac filtering on the router, after a few years one tends to forget things like that lol.

    Cyril are you still using your LP2475W monitor? And is it still living up to your expectations?

    • MadManOriginal
    • 10 years ago

    Nice little article although if you tend to keep your platform for years an i7-860 would have been a logical choice as well. Bu if you don’t do *that* much multithreaded stuff no biggie.

    • mcnels1
    • 10 years ago

    Why do you have MAC address filtering on your wired network? Are strangers sneaking into your house and trying to plug their computers into your network?

      • Cyril
      • 10 years ago

      I don’t believe my router has an option to disable MAC filtering only for the wired part of the network.

        • Flying Fox
        • 10 years ago

        It has been shown that even for wireless networking MAC filtering is ineffective and a PITA to manage.

          • UberGerbil
          • 10 years ago

          While that’s definitely true in theory, in the real world it’s a little different. Certainly MAC filtering is ineffective as a security strategy in itself — for any WiFi hacker with a modicum of skill, sniffing the MAC address and spoofing it is trivial (although in the special case of a single allowed MAC address and one always-connected WiFi device, it’s a little more difficult). However, those kind of threats are relatively rare. Much more common is the technically-ignorant bandwidth leech who is just looking for any available connection. Those people are pretty much thwarted by even minimal barriers.

          As an example I have a friend who lives in a hi-rise with over a dozen access points in range. She inherited an old broadband modem with WiFi, and she regularly had people connecting (either leeching or just accidentally getting her access point instead ot their own). Unfortunately the modem only supported WEP, not WPA, and she wasn’t able to get her laptop to talk to the modem with it enabled (even with me attempting to walk her through it over the phone). However, we were able to get MAC filtering turned on, and with that (and just that) she had no further instances of unauthorized users connecting in the year or two she had it before getting a modern device with working WPA. Of course a sophisticated wardriver would’ve been connected in seconds, and would’ve carved right through WEP as well, but there just aren’t that many of those people and they have plenty of targets with even lower barriers.

          MAC filtering is a PITA if you have frequent guests with WiFi devices, and it could create a false sense of security, but it actually can cut down on casual connections.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            Exactly, it’s just one layer for WiFi security and it does help. The goal is to not be the low-hanging fruit and MAC filtering is one more layer of hassle for someone to break through.

            • Flying Fox
            • 10 years ago

            One more layer of hassle if you do have guests too, as UG pointed out.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            So you turn it off or give their MAC access temporarily. Unless you want to run a totally unsecure wireless network you’re going to have to give them some sort of key anyway. I think you also overlooked the rest of UG’s conclusion 😉 q[

            • UberGerbil
            • 10 years ago

            And it’s not that much of an (added) hassle — my WAP records the MAC of attempted connections, and it’s a one-click operation to add them to the white list. (WPA passphrase is more of a hassle). I have a nice collection of the MAC addresses of my visitors now, so unless they’ve changed machines (or WiFi adapters) they get connected without any additional intervention on return visits.

            • wibeasley
            • 10 years ago

            Or unless they’ve changed enclosures.

            • UberGerbil
            • 10 years ago

            Yeah. Who knew?

            • tay
            • 10 years ago

            You could get the airport with guest mode on it!

    • phez
    • 10 years ago

    RE: 5870 review

    Total System Consumption under load: 290w

      • Voldenuit
      • 10 years ago

      l[

        • crazybus
        • 10 years ago

        Cyril has the *[

          • Voldenuit
          • 10 years ago

          Ah. My bad. Didn’t know the HX series went ‘down’ to 450, so my brain filtered out the article when I skimmed it ^_^

            • MadManOriginal
            • 10 years ago

            Yeah the HX450 has been on Corsair’s website for a good long time but sadly it’s not available in North America as he noted. It’s a shame really because it’s a high quality high efficiency design at a moderate power level that is sufficient for most any single GPU computer, the kind of power supply that knowledgable enthusiasts who aren’t taken in by MOAR POWAR marketing would likely pick up.

            • Flying Fox
            • 10 years ago

            ++

            It is really a shame. May be it is too cheap for them to sell in US/Canada? 🙁

            • SomeOtherGeek
            • 10 years ago

            Yes, it is a shame… They are doing that with any good 80+ PSUs now. Either they stopped making them, they are too expensive or I’m blind as a bat.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 10 years ago

    Now here, clearly, is someone who knows what they’re doing when they upgrade. Good on ya, Cyril.

    I loved that Hyper 212 Plus myself, in terms of cooling ability. But I could not close my case with it installed – in a Cooler Master case, no less – because the way the door is shaped actually indented inward around the fan vent so that you can screw one of those worthless duct thingies to it. Even with the duct removed, though, the heat pipes got “stuck” in the screw holes. For a while I ran the case with the door open, and eventually gave in to a really sweet price on a Scythe Andy Samurai Master for $40 shipped at Newegg, and now I can close my case again.

      • tfp
      • 10 years ago

      I think I would have dremeled/drilled the screw hole so it would have fit.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 10 years ago

        I’d have to either borrow or buy a dremmel. This ended up being cheapest.

      • Flying Fox
      • 10 years ago

      Yeah, I was so nervous when it comes to these tower heatsinks. My last 2 HSF buys are all towers. I made sure I measured the heck out of the case and the actual HSF (nice sales guy at the counter) before I handed over the cash.

      • _Sigma
      • 10 years ago

      Clearly he is doing it wrong. When he ran into the whine problem, he should have blindly changed motherboards, PSUs and everything, in a completely random order, all the while throwing money at the problem.

      🙂

        • TravelMug
        • 10 years ago

        Hahaha, please collect your winnings of “1 internets” at the checkout 😀

    • Sargent Duck
    • 10 years ago

    I’m pretty sure you’d be happy with a 5850. That should be an excellent price/performance card, and give great idle power draw.

    • DrDillyBar
    • 10 years ago

    l[

    • kvndoom
    • 10 years ago

    Not upgrading is no big deal in this day and age. I just last month pulled my single core A46 socket 754 and replaced it with a dual core A64 on socket 939. Barring a critical hardware failure, my next upgrade will not be until 2011, when I’m done with school.

    So, 2005 tech replacing 2005 tech. And yee-haw, it still does everything I need without an issue. Faster, actually, since the work is spread out between cores and one app won’t bog down the system by itself.

      • stmok
      • 10 years ago

      I’m in a similar perspective: Unless something fails, I’m not upgrading until AMD or Intel brings a 4.0Ghz (stock speed), quad-core processor.

      • flip-mode
      • 10 years ago

      A46… hehe. The wonders of 46 bit!

        • Sargent Duck
        • 10 years ago

        Is that better than 64bit?

        x86 -> 64 -> ??46??

          • DrDillyBar
          • 10 years ago

          A46 = 2630bit!

            • axeman
            • 10 years ago

            My A64 x2 has 5320 bits!

            • DrDillyBar
            • 10 years ago

            No one caught the FAH reference

            • axeman
            • 10 years ago

            Bah! I should be ashamed, though I broke that vice a while back.

            • flip-mode
            • 10 years ago

            I caught it immediately and I don’t even fold!

        • kvndoom
        • 10 years ago

        Oh dear, what have I started??? 😛

        I hate typing on those damn laptops at work. My big clumsy hands and those tiny ass keys.

        Too funny.

        I should add that I did future-proof back then by getting the excellent Epox 8NPA-SLI which allowed me PCI-Express and SLI (which I never used) on Socket 754, so I was able to upgrade my video card whenever I wanted. That is an awesome board, and I wish I still had some use for it.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 10 years ago

    Bad, Cyri, bad! Of course your MAC changes with a new motherboard since the NIC are on it and not the case. This is networking 101.

      • khands
      • 10 years ago

      Yeah… I thought that was pretty common knowledge, although I did go to school for that sort of thing so maybe not.

        • Cyril
        • 10 years ago

        I was kidding. Obviously each network controller has its own MAC address, and it has nothing to do with the enclosure (how would that even work?). I just forgot I had MAC filtering enabled on my router. 😉

          • UberGerbil
          • 10 years ago

          Well, I read that as an obvious joke and not an admission of ignorance. But maybe I’m in the minority.

            • axeman
            • 10 years ago

            I took the “who knew?” as tongue-in-cheek as well.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 10 years ago

            well when you’ve got other bloggers like Dustin that just yank hardware without taking time to diagnose, you have to wonder if Teh Stoopid has spread. 😆

            • _Sigma
            • 10 years ago

            I read it as a joke too. I’ve done things like this before :/

            • Meadows
            • 10 years ago

            I kind of /[

            • Tamale
            • 10 years ago

            i actually lol’d since I recently ran into the exact same problem myself 😀

            • Flying Fox
            • 10 years ago

            But there is a small admission of forgetting he has MAC filtering on, which is kind of passé in terms of security configuration.

      • Arxor
      • 10 years ago

      I believe it’s pronounced “WHOOOSH”

    • ironoutsider
    • 10 years ago

    Ahhh new hardware. It’s always so exciting isn’t it?! Feels like new view on life when I get new hardware (which is like every 3 years).

    • Meadows
    • 10 years ago

    How tall is that CPU cooler exactly? As I’m looking at its photo, I keep thinking “I probably couldn’t put back the side of my case”.

    Also,
    g{

    • SubSeven
    • 10 years ago

    Nice Rig. I have a very similar set up in a P182 only Phenom II based. I actually never knew of th 450HX existence. I followed the 520 and 620 for a while and was ready to buy the 520 for 99.99 with a $20 rebate when one day, chance favored me and I accidentally hit a wrong link in my favorites and went to ZipZoomFly and saw a huge ad for a 620HX for $69.99. It was a one day promotion where you got the PSU for $119.99 and got a $50 rebate. I took the chance and it panned out. To this day i am proud to say that of the 15 or so rebates i have mailed, i have not had one not come to me yet (granted some of them took like 6 months to get to me, but still!). At any rate, the HX family are just awesome PSUs. I was truly impressed with the quality and flexibility the 620 i have offered. Well, enjoy the rig, i hope it serves you well.

      • not@home
      • 10 years ago

      I think I got the exact same deal on the 620 as you. $120 – $50 rebate.

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