The more things change…

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    • Duck
    • 8 years ago

    R.I.P. Abit uGuru :'(

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 8 years ago

    FIRST. You can’t prove I’m not.

    • Palek
    • 8 years ago

    Sooo…

    Who at TR has a combover?

    😉

    • FireGryphon
    • 8 years ago

    Ooh, comics on TR. I can live with that! Maybe a comic in each article (or page) just as another way to get the humor across. Good job, Mr. Silver!

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 8 years ago

    Love it! Keep it up!

    • I.S.T.
    • 8 years ago

    This really isn’t funny. 😐

      • jackaroon
      • 8 years ago

      It was about as funny as a New Yorker comic, which is to say “not very,” and I like the New Yorker. The comic is worth a half a sniffle and very slow nod. I’ll even say that I kind of like the New Yorker comics, but I like them because they appear while I am reading the New Yorker. If the new TR comic were an inset for an existing article, I think it would be more timely way of hitting the reader at the right moment for a short and simple, throwaway joke. By comparison, I don’t get an email from the New Yorker announcing that they have a new comic for me to look at. That would be irritating.

      Like a spice, it’s adds flavor but you sure can’t make a meal out of it. Having this in my RSS feed is kind of like trying to eat a teaspoon of cinnamon.

    • glynor
    • 8 years ago

    Love it!!

    • ChangWang
    • 8 years ago

    ROFL!

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    I buy a case riddled with fans 120mm or larger so I can set them all to the lowest setting and enjoy great air flow and low temps/noise. Some how mobo manufacturers make even this simple task a chore.

    • yogibbear
    • 8 years ago

    Could also do the same pic again and have “What about matte finish?”

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      “Matt doesn’t work here anymore, sorry”

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    I still cannot fathom why fan controllers are such a big deal.

    Power comes at a price, if you want to go silent or at least make a system quiet. You have to give something for it.

    The first easy step, don’t shoot for modern high-end CPUs/GPUs. Their combined consumption at load starts at 200W and can easily go over 300W. The ATX form factor was never designed for that kind of heat dissipation. FYI, it was designed back when the Pentium I and K5 were new kids on the block. The fastest “GPU” were some generic SVGA chips with 2-4MB of VRAM tied to VLB/PCI. It can barely handle 300W of heat dissipation without sounding like a jet engine/industry-grade room fan.

    The second way is going with alternative cooling solutions which typically cost a bit more than air-cooling and may have their own issues.

    If you need to stick with air-cooling, the last piece of advise is to carefully do some resource on your components (fans, CPU, GPU). Figure out how much power you really “need” and how much “noise” you are wiling to tolerate. This is where you will find a compromise.

      • Dposcorp
      • 8 years ago

      The big deal is some people want to be able to fine tune fan speed, fan noise, cooling performance, and power draw based on their needs at the time and environment they are in.

      I want my fans to act a certain way at a certain temperature, and they wont.
      Why do you think fan controllers are still selling well?

      Adding the function to a bios should be a piece of cake, since everything is able to be fine tuned, yet it isnt being done.

        • ludi
        • 8 years ago

        You couldn’t possibly have different needs and tastes than me. That violates Rule #4 of the Internets!

          • Dposcorp
          • 8 years ago

          Thems fightin werds!

      • Johnny5
      • 8 years ago

      By default the fans tend to cool much more aggressively than they need to at idle. My computer is at idle or low load for the vast majority of the time, yet the fans are still quite audible as they keep my cpu and gpu very near ambient temperatures. For chips that can run at 60C-70C (something like that) constantly for long periods and not have a problem, working hard to keep the temperature in the 20C area is just overkill for me. I really don’t want to and shouldn’t need to hear my graphics card fan at idle, yet thanks to laughable fan controls on my card I have to. There’s something wrong here.

        • PoisonJam
        • 8 years ago

        Johnny5 – you could try resistors between the fans and the mobo header. Added expensive but will drop the fans a few V so they now run lower at the fan controller’s default speed.

        Fans like Nexus RealSilents run at 1000RPM @12V so work great on most fan controllers.

        I have a Gigabyte DS3 which has fantastic fan control, but I’m thinking of upgrading to i5 and my biggest worry is the next board won’t!

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      No, the issue is that for an enthusiast (typically gaming) PC, there is a gulf of as much as 200W between the power consumption (and consummate heat output) of the CPU/GPU during heavy use vs when idle at the desktop. Thus cooling requirements vary drastically over time. The fan noise during heavy use may be too high, or it might be tolerable, but that’s irrelevant. The point here is not that the fan noise is intolerable during heavy use, it’s that the fan noise isn’t proportional to the usage because you have such little control over it. In order to handle the worst case power output, you have to put up with more noise than necessary during other times because of limited fan controls. Or use separate fan control hardware/software and/or overbuild with many extra large, low-RPM fans, ignoring the motherboard fan controls entirely (even thought the mobo controls could do the job for most people, if the mfrs invested some development effort).

      Look at the comic again. Nobody is complaining about fan noise; they’re complaining about the binary nature of the fan controls.

        • Krogoth
        • 8 years ago

        It seems only a small, but vocal minority is creating most of the noise. The vast majority simply don’t care or don’t know any better.

        Motherboard manufacturers are going to follow the market’s needs a.k.a “majority”. They don’t see the point to pour more R&D funds towards more advance, low-level fan control options. This is an industry where margins are razor-thin.

          • Corrado
          • 8 years ago

          Yet they feel the need to dump R&D to put huge purple useless heatpipes and radiators on the chipsets, extra copper layers for ‘EMI shielding’ or whatever, and bios overclocking controls that get used by a very small portion of the market.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            The crowd would wants extra whistles on their motherboards tend to the crowd who are all about “epenis” and “bling” crap. They might even want the extra “noise” akin to muscle cars/motorcycles.

          • flip-mode
          • 8 years ago

          You don’t have the knowledge to say that, do you? You don’t know how many people there are that want the feature nor do you know the percentage of people buying motherboards that want the feature, do you? Do you have that information from a legitimate source?

          No, you don’t.

          I’d be willing to bet that most people have just given up by now. Most people have found work around solutions such as fan speed controllers (I have one myself) and purchasing specific fans on the basis of their noice level (I have several fans I’ve purchased for this reason).

          I’d also bet that anyone that has resorted to any of these workarounds such as myself would love to have some more sophisticated motherboard-based fan speed control. I know I would.

          Motherboard makers have been lazy and have ignored the market’s desires and there is evidence for that in the fact that there are so many products on the market to control fan noise – from quite fans to fan speed controllers to cases with acoustic padding on the inside of them to passively cooled video cards and even websites like SPCR.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            I didn’t say anywhere that “slient/low-noise” crowd were non-existent. They are just a vocal minority, not vocal enough to gain the attention of motherboard manufacturers. The few that are listening already provide a rich array of solutions. Giving motherboard manufacturers another reason not to care.

          • SomeOtherGeek
          • 8 years ago

          All that time and money being put into all the bells and whistles, but they can’t spend a little time on fan controls? Makes zero sense to me.

          They can gauge the temperatures and speeds of the CPU and such, but they can’t put two and two together?

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            When was the time motherboard manufacturers did something that made sense?

            I suspect this is a classic case of marketing/management conflicting with the engineers in design/features decisions.

            In eyes of marketers/management, the customers in the enthusiast market are a bunch of “Type-R, epenis and bling types”. The noise, UV/blue lights, cheesy heatsink/heatpipe setup and lawyer safe images are part of the whole experience!

          • Bensam123
          • 8 years ago

          “Small but vocal minority” seems to be the flagship argument for anyone who doesn’t want to acknowledge a problem anymore or they simply call them a troll. When a minority becomes big enough, it is no longer a minority. Even if you take into account 10% of all people post on forums, if one 10% is a hell of a lot bigger then another 10% you can tell that it’s affecting more people unless those people are duplicates (using an extra account or such).

          That is classic logic that has become popular because of Blizzard.

          Statistics aren’t that hard. People are just fucking stupid.

            • Krogoth
            • 8 years ago

            I am looking at the problem from the manufacturer’s perceptive. (Devil’s advocate)

            Why should they care when only a small group of their customer base is harping about it? There is *already* a rich array of fan controllers and such that can satisfy their needs. The R&D costs aren’t worth it (it is more than just slapping on a dedicated fan controller chip).

          • Palek
          • 8 years ago

          [quote<]Motherboard manufacturers are going to follow the market's needs a.k.a "majority". They don't see the point to pour more R&D funds towards more advance, low-level fan control options. This is an industry where margins are razor-thin.[/quote<] You make it sound like fan control is rocket science that requires huge investment. Any electronics engineer with half a brain can design a cheap fan control system in half a minute. In any case, the R&D is done, and [url=http://www.ite.com.tw/EN/products_more.aspx?CategoryID=3&ID=5,66<]fan control features are readily available in super-I/O chips[/url<] that are integrated on all motherboards. [url=https://techreport.com/articles.x/19856<]AMD even has some pretty advanced fan control features integrated right into their southbridges as of the SB850[/url<]. It's just a matter of enabling the features in BIOS/UEFI which is, again, not rocket science.

      • morphine
      • 8 years ago

      It’s pretty simple: if you have decent fan controls (minimum and maximum temperature ranges is more than enough, or quiet/normal/loud profiles in a pinch), then you can have a quiet AND powerful PC.

      Thankfully my Asus board at least has minimal profile adjustment so I do have my cake and eat it.

      More to the point, it’s so easy to implement and so important for the end users that it’s getting pretty ridiculous that manufacturers constantly ignore this.

      Would you accept a car that has a powerful engine, ABS, ESP, the works, but doesn’t have electric windows or a central lock?

        • Krogoth
        • 8 years ago

        Oddly enough, there are performance cars out there with that kind of setup. 😉

          • Meadows
          • 8 years ago

          You didn’t answer the question.

        • bhtooefr
        • 8 years ago

        What’s nice on Thinkpads… the embedded controller can be controlled from within the OS, and the Windows app for doing this, TPFanControl, supports using a text file for fine-tuning the fan ramp-up and down based on temperature. Something like this for desktops, and supporting multiple fans (ideally just telling the EC how to manage fan speed, rather than actively changing it from the OS side in response to temp changes), would be ideal.

      • Bensam123
      • 8 years ago

      I’m not sure what’s not to get here, this is almost such a non-argument I don’t know how to approach it. What’s hard to understanding that some people want to balance noise with their workload? They want their fans to be loud when they need cooling and quiet when they don’t. It’s not hard to understand at all.

      Hell this is why there are four pin headers for fans on processor sockets now. It’s so it can be dynamically scaled up and down based on the heatload. Just the same as graphics and processors scale up their speeds based on workloads. In this case it saves power and noise.

    • S_D
    • 8 years ago

    LOL! So true 🙁

      • NeelyCam
      • 8 years ago

      Funny how my H57 Intel mobo has better fan speed controls than [i<]any[/i<] mobo I've had in the past.

        • quarantined
        • 8 years ago

        Between the controls in Asus’ P67 EFI and using MSI Afterburner for my 6970, I have my fans set up just how I want them: near silent at idle and jet engine simulator under heavy load. A little work and a nice, silent idle isn’t too hard to achieve.

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