Some thoughts on Mac OS X Lion

I had planned to write a more exhaustive review of Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, but alas, other projects and unforeseen setbacks have forced me to be more succinct. That’s not entirely bad, I suppose. Lion has been out for a good couple of weeks now, and odds are folks who care about such things have already come across an in-depth review or two. (John Siracusa’s 19-page epic over at Ars Technica is certainly worth a read, if you can spare the time.)

What I’d like to do, instead, is talk about OS X Lion in a more general sense from my perspective as a humble user. I grabbed the new operating system shortly after its release on July 20, and I’ve been using it on and off since then, trying to get comfortable with the new features, the user-interface changes, and the compatibility kinks among third-party apps.

Lion serves up many neat additions—definitely more than the previous OS X release. Launchpad keeps all of your installed applications in a tidy, iOS-style grid just a touchpad gesture away. The Mission Control feature combines the strong points of Exposé and Spaces, allowing you to dart across windows, applications, and desktops all from one central hub. Apple has implemented full-screen apps, which almost blur the distinction between OS X and iOS. A myriad of other little goodies, like inertial scrolling and new UI animations, spice up the experience further.

I’m slowly learning to appreciate the novelties, all the while trying not to grumble about the changes. Apple has shown once again that it’s not afraid to re-sculpt its operating system with a chainsaw, putting its own vision ahead of the impulse to keep users in a peaceful bubble of old habits. Front Row, for instance, is gone, giving way to iTunes’ full-screen mode (and, no doubt about it, the separately sold Apple TV). The addition of a zillion new multi-touch gestures has had the side effect of killing drag-and-dropping in tap-to-click mode, while three-finger swipes to go back and forward in Finder windows are now disabled by default. The three-finger swipes can be re-enabled in the Trackpad control panel, while the setting to restore the old drag-and-drop mechanism is hidden away under Universal Access. Also, if you were familiar with Exposé, too bad. Mission Control is the new kid in town, and you’ll have to learn how to use that before your productivity can ramp up again. Before then, you’ll probably find yourself trying to track down the setting that disables Lion’s annoying iOS-style autocorrect (it’s in the Language & Text control panel, under the Text tab).

Now, an aggressive approach to operating system updates certainly has its upsides. Having to re-learn how to use you computer every few years might suck, but OSes stifled by an excessive mindfulness of backward compatibility can suck even more.

That’s what you might think, at least. Strangely, though, using OS X Lion doesn’t feel like starting from a clean slate. In fact, now more than ever, I get the feeling that Apple lacks a cohesive vision for its Mac operating system—or if it doesn’t, that vision fails to shine through in day-to-day use. Despite being so bold in so many ways, OS X still comes across as a jumbled mess of user-interface paradigms from different epochs, all failing to coexist peacefully like quirky roommates in a sitcom.

Paradoxically, and despite its greater emphasis on backward compatibility, Windows feels more cohesive than this latest OS X release. Maybe it’s because, thus far, Microsoft has been too afraid to upset users with sweeping changes and additions, preferring instead to insert more subtle improvements at a slower pace. Vista hardly shook up old interface paradigms, even if it applied a new coat of paint to them.

Lion just combines too many different philosophies for its own good. The menu bar remains at the top of the screen, for example, evoking the early days of Mac OS. Back then, windows were always children of their parent application, and closing all of an app’s windows left the app running with its menu bar awaiting instructions. When OS X came along, some apps took to emulating Windows software, automatically quitting when their main window was shuttered. Now, Lion adds a third behavior: full-screen apps, which turn the Mac’s timeless window-centric philosophy up on its head.

Another throwback to the original Mac days is the notion of apps as self-contained entities in the file system. That worked in the original Mac days, but many OS X apps now have installers that toss files all over the place… and, for the most part, there are no uninstallers. Lion doesn’t fix that. To make matters more confusing, application icons seem to be replicated in an ever-increasing variety of locations: you’ve now got the Applications folder, where software is actually installed; the Dock, where apps purchased in the Mac App Store automatically appear; the Applications directory shortcut in the Dock, which opens up a bubble with a list of all installed applications; and Launchpad, which presents the same list in a grid spanning the whole screen. Which icons are the real apps, and which ones are the shortcuts? Good luck figuring that one out, grandma.

Perhaps the worst offender in this menagerie of ill-aged UI elements is the Finder, which awkwardly takes design cues from web browsers and blends them with the old-school, one-window-per-folder design of the original Mac. Finder windows randomly lose their toolbars, and only with Lion have users gained the ability to apply different view settings (list, icon, column, or Cover Flow) to specific folders. Before Lion came out last month, switching one OS X folder to list view applied that setting system-wide. Lion supplements the Finder with the entirely absurd All My Files screen, which shows every file in your user directory, sorted by category, in flat horizontal lists. For me, that means each new Finder window proudly shows me all of my IRC log files, which are generated automatically every day and searched once in a blue moon.

In a way, it seems like this helter-skelter design philosophy can be traced back to the late 1990s, when Apple tried to impart NeXTSTEP with the look and feel of Mac OS in a bid to put Mac OS 9 out of its misery. Mac OS X started its life as the strange lovechild of the old Mac operating system and a Unix-like workstation OS with a radically different UI. Today, the genetic defects stemming from that awkward mating are as apparent as ever—and genes pilfered from Windows and iOS along the way have only made OS X uglier, at least from a UI consistency standpoint. I’m left wishing that Apple had given us NeXTSTEP 5.0 instead of Mac OS X 10.0 a decade ago. (But alas, Apple needed the Mac-like UI to ease the transition and hold on to its then-slim market share.) I cringe when I think of a novice user picking up his first Mac today and trying to make sense of the conflicting UI paradigms in an OS that’s, strangely, billed as more homogenous and consistent than the competition.

Now, I don’t want you to come away with the wrong impression. These are complaints about OS X as a whole rather than Lion specifically. As a power user, I find the aforementioned flaws more a source of disappointment than a genuine impediment to my productivity. The only really serious issue with Lion may be the application compatibility issues I’ve run into. (Google Chrome 12, for instance, supported the full-screen feature but wouldn’t let me switch out of full-screen mode until I quit and restarted the app.) Compatibility kinks aren’t really Apple’s fault, and they’re a necessary hurdle faced by any radical OS update. Considering the rather modest $29.99 asking price, I think Lion offers enough improvements over Snow Leopard to make up for the oversights in its design.

Rather, I’m more disappointed to think of what Lion could have been than to see what it really is.

Apple needs to realize—if it hasn’t already—that it just can’t shoehorn ideas from Mac OS Classic, NeXSTEP, Windows, iOS, and Mac OS X into a single, homogenous product. There are already rumors that Lion may be the last OS X release, and I certainly hope that’s true. Hopefully, the future of the Mac lies with a supercharged version of iOS and an OS X compatibility mode for legacy apps. OS X as it exists today just needs to retire, though. Its best days are gone, and the future calls for something quite different.

I think we’re currently seeing the start of a dramatic shift in user-interface models, much like the great migration from the command line to GUIs that began three decades ago. Back then, power users clung to their DOS screens and Unix shells, but graphical interfaces allowed a new wave of users to embrace computing. Today, users are fleeing the now-clunky GUIs of Mac OS X and Windows, favoring tablets an order of magnitude more elegant and straightforward to use. And with good reason. How many Mac and PC users lack a full understanding of how to use their computers? How many fear to venture beyond the familiar waters of their web browser and e-mail clients? How many have no option but to call tech-savvy friends whenever they encounter problems printing a document, upgrading Skype, or trying to deal with a virus infection?

The answer: entirely too many. And an evolutionary approach to PC operating system design is not the solution. Microsoft realizes that, if those Windows 8 user-interface demos are any indication. I hope Apple realizes it, too.

Comments closed
    • esterhasz
    • 8 years ago

    I use Forklift as a Finder replacement, Witch for task switching and Quicksilver for app launching. I barely noticed it when switching to Lion…

    • burntham77
    • 8 years ago

    If Apple and Microsoft are going to make operating systems that are meant to work across all devices, some initial disjointedness is to be expected.

    I would guess that Apple will get things right the next time around. I would also guess Windows 8 will be a step in the right direction, but it will be Windows 9 that will do the concept justice.

    • Anonymous Coward
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]I think we're currently seeing the start of a dramatic shift in user-interface models, much like the great migration from the command line to GUIs that began three decades ago.[/quote<] Bah! OSX might have run off the tracks but that doesn't mean we need some hand-wavy reinvention of what works. My best user interface experience ever was my Linux machine running the Blackbox window manager, where I never once had an icon representing a file or folder. I had a huge screen, lots of virtual desktops, a desktop right-click menu set up with common programs, prominently including a terminal for launching whatever program I wanted. These days I work in Windows 7. The file browser is great but they could really use a decent command line. I have OSX 10.4 and I'm not sure if the superior command line compensates for its GUI crudeness compared to Windows 7. I imagine the Linux crowd will eventually reach user interface perfection if they can maintain focus.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 8 years ago

    Once Apple is in full swing with the ARM stuff I see them ditching Intel and the x86 platform altogether and moving their entire product line to a even more enclosed environment. I see them merging iOS and OS X into one standard OS and having iPhone, iPod, iMac, iPad and the Macbook Pro’s all using ARM CPU’s, iOS (or whatever it’s going to be called) and having all apps be installed though iTunes or the App Store. I can see them keeping the MacPro’s x86 for “real work” because of the speed of Intel chips and they don’t want to lose that segment that machine caters to.

    I am a firm believer in this. The way Apple wants absolute control on everything and based on how well the i stuff sells plus with OS X Lion basically having a iOS type interface that is how i see the company moving. Sorry I am a little buzzed but I hope that makes sense. In 3 years you will have all ARM based iStuff running on iOSX and only able to install software if it came from the Apple store or iTunes unless you “Jail Break” your iStuff device to run 3rd party apps.

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 8 years ago

      Ars has a number of good articles on the subject, but I’m not sure ARM can every replace x86 (or AMD64 if we want to be accurate here) on most of Apple’s lineups. I could paraphrase the article, but it can be read here:

      [url<]http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2011/05/apple-could-adopt-arm-for-laptops-but-why-would-it.ars[/url<]

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    Cyril, you are rather fond of M31 (Andromeda Galaxy). 😉

      • Cyril
      • 8 years ago

      That’s the default Lion wallpaper, actually. 😉

      Although, since I usually go with astronomy wallpapers anyway, I’m sticking with it for now.

    • vortigern_red
    • 8 years ago

    “When OS X came along, some apps took to emulating Windows software, automatically quitting when their main window was shuttered.”

    They don’t emulate Windows software (apart from a few big cross platform apps from the likes of Adobe and MS) there are specific Mac OS rules on whether an Application quits on closing its ONLY window! (the only is a clue) i.e. system pref close on closing its only window.

    This also applies to your, poor, installation point, most Mac OS apps don’t need installing at all and only write extra files to ~/library on first run except for the big cross platform stuff and some Apple stuff.

    ” Before Lion came out last month, switching one OS X folder to list view applied that setting system-wide”

    Completely and utterly wrong! It has always been possible to apply the current view to the current window only or all windows. Now the finder won’t always do it and that has long been a problem which appears to have got worse in Lion not better for most people, it actually worked most of the time in Snow Leopard.

    “For me, that means each new Finder window proudly shows me all of my IRC log files, which are generated automatically every day and searched once in a blue moon.”

    Just select a different folder for the “open new Finder windows in ” preference if you don’t like it (One of the first things I did). Next you will be complaining about the default wallpaper or the default browser homepage! 🙂

    “you’ve now got the Applications folder, where software is actually installed;”

    Eh no, you can install software pretty much anywhere in the file system…

    “the Dock, where apps purchased in the Mac App Store automatically appear;”

    Applications are not in the dock! Just aliases, just like the windows quick launch toolbar, the Applications were still installed elsewhere…

    “the Applications directory shortcut in the Dock”

    Eh, yes, it’s a “shortcut” to the folder you mentioned two lines before! bear in mind that this is the same as adding the “Program Files” folder to the quick launch toolbar in Windows and in Mac OS Lion you would have to add this folder SPECIFICALLY or be upgrading from an OS where it already existed. It does *not* exist in a default Lion install! It has been replaced by launchpad…

    “Launchpad, which presents the *same* list in a grid spanning the whole screen. Which icons are the real apps, and which ones are the shortcuts? Good luck figuring that one out, grandma.”

    WTF, they are all aliases, there are no applications in launchpad, every icon is a “shortcut” and there are no shortcuts to shortcuts, you have not even presented any in your screenshot!

    I’ve emphasise your SAME above as it is completely and utterly WRONG! Did you do any research before writing this article?

    Launchpad differs greatly from the Applications folder and the, aforementioned “shortcut” to it by listing applications installed outside the Applications folder! This is the very reason it exists, it also finds Applications installed in ~/applications and all the developer stuff normally installed in /developer. In fact it probably finds applications all over the place because users can’t be trusted to install applications in /Applications.

    “Now, Lion adds a third behavior: full-screen apps, which turn the Mac’s timeless window-centric philosophy up on its head.”

    Agreed full screen apps need to go, they are a sop to Windows and iOS users.

    “Google Chrome 12, for instance, supported the full-screen feature but wouldn’t let me switch out of full-screen mode until I quit and restarted the app.”

    Not beng a chrome user myself, I understand Chrome does not use Lion’s full screen feature but is a full screen implementation by Google and has existed before Lion full screen. A hack.

    “Hopefully, the future of the Mac lies with a supercharged version of iOS and an OS X compatibility mode for legacy apps.”

    This sums up the entire problem with your “review”, Mac OS needs to keeps far way from iOS, just keeping the new iPhone users happy will not last long, once they realise that using a phone os on a Mac Pro with two 30 Inch screens is a slightly different experience to a 3 inch screen.

    I don’t see anyone calling for Windows 8 to take after Windows CE, why would they? They are completely different things. Apple’s biggest mistake with Lion has been to try and iOS-ify Mac OS.

    Launchpad is useless to an actual Mac user, Full screen apps are useless with a decent sized screen and even worse with more than one screen, mission control is a poor replacement for spaces and expose for someone that actually uses the features. All the gesture stuff is useless to someone who uses, you know, a mouse!

    Generally a poor post Cyril, factually incorrect in several places and showing a poor understanding of mac OSX. sorry if this post come across overly negative I just don’t think you have sufficient understanding to write a review of Mac OS, compare what you have produced to Siracusa’s review!

      • bthylafh
      • 8 years ago

      tl;dr

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      who is this guy? why is he taking up my screen space with so many words! people could be reading [i<] my [/i<] posts!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        Quite obviously, someone on the internet is WRONG and it’s up to this guy to right all the wrongs on the internet.

      • Cyril
      • 8 years ago

      A few things…

      I’m perfectly aware of where and how applications are installed, which icons are shortcuts, and which icons are not. My point is that OS X shows app icons in a [i<]lot[/i<] of different places, which is bound to make things confusing for novices. (I also disagree that "most" OS X apps don't have installers. A lot of them do, including Adobe software, iLife, etc.) My complaint about view settings being applied system-wide isn't "completely and utterly wrong." From John Siracusa's [url=http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews/2007/10/mac-os-x-10-5.ars/12#divided<]Leopard review[/url<]: [quote<] What the Leopard Finder no longer even attempts to do, however, is remember the view style for each folder (e.g., list view, icon view) unless explicitly asked to do so by the user. Here are the steps required to do that. Open the folder. Set its view style to the desired state. Open the View Options panel (type command-j or select the item in the View menu). Check the "Always open in ... " checkbox, where "... " will be the view style set in step 2. [/quote<] Yes, there was a convoluted way to have per-folder view settings before, but as far as I can see, Lion doesn't require me to jump through the same hoops. If I click the list view button in the toolbar while viewing a given folder, it won't show other folders in list view unless I asked it to. Snow Leopard would just stick to list view for everything until I switched back. Annoying. Finally, you're right that nobody is calling for Windows 8 to take after Windows CE. However, Windows 8 very clearly takes after Windows Phone 7, which is Microsoft's current iOS competitor in the handset market. See the [url=https://techreport.com/discussions.x/21049<]demo video here[/url<].

      • d0g_p00p
      • 8 years ago

      Wow, talk about fanboy rage. Since Cyril is the only mac user on this site I would take his review over your rant on what you think was wrong with his review.

    • DancesWithLysol
    • 8 years ago

    “And an evolutionary approach to PC operating system design is not the solution. Microsoft realizes that, if those Windows 8 user-interface demos are any indication. I hope Apple realizes it, too.”

    How elegant will the iOS/Android/WP7 interface will seem once you load it up with a feature list the size of current desktop operating systems? I honestly think its the lack of features that make simple tasks on iOS “easy” (and complex tasks frustrating).

    I think these major redesigns make the UI seem “easy” right now because they are shedding features, and that cuts both ways.

      • kc77
      • 8 years ago

      What features are they shedding? You can type documents, read email, browse the internet, game, etc. Tablets, phones, etc are really more about form factor than anything else. Feature wise there isn’t too much they can’t do. If anything Tablets, Phones, etc remind us of just how much computational power we’ve gained since the casio calculator.

      Let’s get real here the additional wasted CPU cycles is what has spawned folding because largely even a budget desktop is more than enough for 90% of the common tasks people need from their PC’s on a daily basis with tons of additional cycles left over.

      It’s getting to the point with the improvements of IGP’s that buying discrete is almost luxury at this point. I just don’t see the requirement for this additional feature list.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    Imagine that, iOS 10.7 Lion is not a hit. Color me non-plussed. The desktop and the phone/tablet are different paradigms. Not surprised this frankenstein OS didn’t get high marks from Cyril.

      • End User
      • 8 years ago

      I was under the impression that Lion was well received. Sales are good. Reviews are positive (for the most part). And, most importantly, I love it. 🙂

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        SURPRISE!!! FANBOY LOVES PRODUCT!!!

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 years ago

          I love OS X, but when the main selling point is “well you can turn these features off” then…well…I think I’m over it.

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            Are you running it?

            • Meadows
            • 8 years ago

            Why would we?

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            This is The TechReport, not The WindowsReport.

            • Meadows
            • 8 years ago

            False dilemma.

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            What do you mean by “we”?

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            i’d assume he means herself and me. we’re pretty much the same person. you should know that by now.

            • Meadows
            • 8 years ago

            “He” means “herself”? Come on, if you mean to change my gender, at least say it right.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            lol well done. seems to be a bit of a Freudian slip! it was late ok. ;P

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 years ago

            There’s not a convincing reason to run it for me. Everything new is something I’d be turning off. I might as well continue to run Snow Leopard.

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 8 years ago

      I really like Lion and I’m not sure what the real issues are beyond the typical bitching about a new OS X release.

      In my experience, the people most meaningfully critical of Apple’s products are the ones who actually use them, not the anti fanboys sniping useless from the sidelines. I don’t really care about the ethos of the UI or the consistency of the design, but I do like the usability enhancements that really seem to cater to how I use my Air. Hell, the not-having-to-re-open-programs after I switch between accounts features is worth the $29 alone.

      I’m not saying anyone else should rush out and buy Lion (and certainly not until a patch or two into it), but it suits my usage model very well and I’m happy about the changes.

    • End User
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]The addition of a zillion new multi-touch gestures has had the side effect of killing drag-and-dropping in tap-to-click mode[/quote<] Which new gesture kills drag-and-drop in tap-to-click mode? I've got that working and I have every gesture activated (I think). [quote<]Google Chrome 13, for instance, supports the full-screen feature but won't let me switch out of full-screen mode until I quit and restarted the app.[/quote<] That does not sound right. Both shift-cmd-F and the View menu option allow me to jump in and out of Full Screen in Chrome 13.0.782.107. I don't understand their treatment of full screen apps when using multiple monitors. That one has me scratching my head. I like what Andy Ihnatko had to say in his Lion review: "Of course you should upgrade to Lion. It’s the ultimate no-brainer." "Mind you, I’m still eager to see Apple build a truly new operating system that jettisons every last lingering longstanding element of the Mac OS that objectively has no place in a modern computer. Until then, Lion is a big enough slice of the future to make almost anybody happy."

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      I think for the price, you might as well stay current. You don’t HAVE to use the UI changes. They’re all easily ignorable, or configurable back to SnowLeopard style. But the updated kernel and underlying features are great to have, especially for $30 for your entire house.

      • Cyril
      • 8 years ago

      [quote<]Which new gesture kills drag-and-drop in tap-to-click mode? I've got that working and I have every gesture activated (I think).[/quote<] Snow Leopard let me drag and drop icons by double-tapping and dragging. Lion doesn't. There's an option to use three fingers to drag and drop, but that doesn't work if you enable three-finger swipes to go back/forward in the Finder and other apps. [quote<]That does not sound right. Both shift-cmd-F and the View menu option allow me to jump in and out of Full Screen in Chrome 13.0.782.107.[/quote<] Doh. Meant Chrome 12, not 13.... lost count. I never tried the keyboard shortcut, but there was a full-screen mode button at the top right of the window. Once you clicked it, the icon disappeared, and there was no button to switch back like in other apps. Edit: Chrome 13 fixes the problem by removing the icon, but its full-screen mode still doesn't behave like it should. The full-screen session shows up as a window in Mission Control.

        • End User
        • 8 years ago

        [quote<]Snow Leopard let me drag and drop icons by double-tapping and dragging. Lion doesn't.[/quote<] I forgot you have to enable it via Universal Access [url<]http://goo.gl/xE2n0[/url<]

          • Cyril
          • 8 years ago

          Wow. Talk about burying that feature!

          Thanks, though… nice to have that working again.

            • Corrado
            • 8 years ago

            Yup, this was the ONE thing I had to Google to disable.

        • teryan2006
        • 8 years ago

        There actually an uninstall function in Lion now. For apps installed via Mac App Store at least. Click on hold an icon in Launchpad into jiggle mode. You’ll get the (X) to delete. Just like iOS. You can also hold the option key as a toggle for jiggle mode.

        With Apple ‘encouraging’ developers to distribute via mac app store (who only approves apps that are self-contained bundles), the uninstall situation is actually getting better in Lion.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          Better? you mean it’s actually there. removing apps from osx is a nightmare otherwise.

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            I’ve never come across a “nightmare” app uninstall. Most apps can just be trashed from the Applications folder and you are done. If you want to be picky about it you can check /Library, /Library/Preferences and /Library/Application Support to clean out any misc files left behind.

            3rd party System Preferences can be removed by right clicking on a system pref icon and then select “Remove”.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            suddenly wanting to remove all the files left from an application is picky? only in the mac world is such stuff “normal”. if windows installers are leaving a mess of files behind, you hear people rightly saying “fix it”. In mac world though, you’re being “picky”.
            I do like osx. i’m a linux user, and i appreciate a lot of the similarities, but i don’t know why you relish the inconsistencies, and bad user experiences provided by OSX

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            From a power users point of view I’d say grow a pair. From an average consumers point of view I’d say you are right.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            obviously, from a power user, then who gives an f. we play with computers for [i<] fun [/i<] . but from a consumer point of view, which apple is the king of, we're finally in agreement on something. that being said they are moving the right direction, so good on them. it's only 16 years since windows 95.

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            The interesting thing is that OS X is no longer Apple’s primary consumer OS. Apple’s primary consumer OS has solved the app uninstall problem. I’m guessing that Android and WP7 have solved it as well.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            yah. iOS does fine. wp7 does too. android does ok as well. but, osx is still an consumer os. how many macs did they sell last quarter? a bajillion? you argue that macs are taking over the consumer market, except when they should be sorting issues out, then it’s suddenly fine, because it’s not the consumer version? get it straight man.

            • End User
            • 8 years ago

            Mobile operating systems are defining the future. OSX, Linux and Windows are looking a tad rough around the edges.

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 8 years ago

            Because uninstalling programs in Windows removes all of the fi-

            No, actually it’s pretty terrible there too. Who knew that software developers were often lazy regardless of the platform!

    • Corrado
    • 8 years ago

    I agree with you about a lot of the features that people grumble about. Its not that its bad, its that its different and people don’t like that they have to change, even if its better. This is seen even in a lot of people’s feelings about Vista and Win7. They don’t want to switch from XP because thats what they know, and despite Win7 being much better, they don’t want to hear it.

      • indeego
      • 8 years ago

      Nobody where I work felt this way, they were happy to move off XP, and while the adjustment factor was slightly more than 2000–>XP, overall they really like it. We make heavy use of multiple displays and 7 is eons above XP in this regard.

      Vista is/was another matter. We tested Vista, started rollout, and the backlash was immediate, and we stuck with XP until well after 7’s release with a lot more testing.

        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago

        People here complained about the rollout of Win7. It was mostly the 50+ year old women in accounting and HR that can’t log in without looking at their step by step cheat sheet given to them, though. But, enough that upper management forced IS to not make it mandatory. Now Corp IS is having shitfit about it.

        I know my dad (who is 65) didn’t want Win7. He didn’t want Office 2007 either. When his hard drive died on him, he complained incessantly to me about putting Win7/Office2007 on his computer. Now a year later he says he likes it better than XP, but he just wasn’t thrilled about having to learn a new way to do some of the same things, even if it was a better way to do them.

    • Hrunga Zmuda
    • 8 years ago

    OS X is going to be with us for a few more versions. Steve Jobs early on pegged the life of OS X as 15 years. Four to go!

    But of course, that was before the iPhone and iPod had changed Apple in ways they couldn’t have foreseen.

    I agree OS X could be so much better than it is. But the realities of the market are just not going to let them change too quickly. Way faster than the competition, but not fast enough for many of us.

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]> Today, users are fleeing the now-clunky GUIs of Mac OS X and Windows, favoring tablets an order of magnitude more elegant and straightforward to use.[/quote<] They are fleeing it? I thought they were supplanting it. Tablets are less powerful. Less flexible. Less precise. You typed, edited this article on a Tablet?

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      something like an asus transformer, sure. there’s no reason you couldn’t. Microsoft has seen the writing on the wall, surprisingly, before apple, though apple initiated it.

      Tablet/transformers ARE the future. with projectors like the samsung galaxy beam, will allow computing anywhere, and at low cost. it’s a matter of time until things like osx are business only.

        • indeego
        • 8 years ago

        A projector-based display + Kinect already shows you how limiting a touch-based UI and tablets are. Projected displays and near-field touchless input are above and beyond the glass-based touch bullsh*t we put up with now, and I also welcome it, but they are not anywhere near primetime with resolution issues.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          i think we’re probably less than 5 years away. there’s a thing on ted talks about making a wall based projected computing experience out of a feature phone. It’s not that long off.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This