Just one more mission: impressions of the new Deus Ex

It’s now 9PM. My plan was to start writing this post three hours ago, but that didn’t pan out. Instead of writing, I found myself running around in circa-2027 Hengsha Island, China, splitting up my time between sleuthing, sneaking, and breaking bones. Deus Ex: Human Revolution is just one of those games—the kind that has you persuading yourself to stop after just one more mission… before playing for another three hours and wondering where your evening went.

I was a big fan of the original Deus Ex. I remember playing it on my 1GHz Athlon hot rod 11 years ago and enjoying every moment. Oh, sure, the gameplay mechanics borrowed heavily from System Shock 2, but there was a whole other dimension to it. Character interactions, side quests, and the intricate storyline all made the game feel broad and dynamic, like you were a real actor unraveling a complex web of conspiracies. (The original release seemed to require some sort of supercomputer to run, though. I recall some pretty bad stuttering on my then-speedy machine.)

Ion Storm Austin managed to squeeze out a sequel in 2003 before getting shut down, but I never bothered with it. Reports of that title being dumbed down and scaled down for the Xbox offended my sensibilities as a proud, 18-year-old PC gamer, and I decided to occupy my time with other games. I slowly forgot about the Deus Ex series altogether—until, that is, news of Human Revolution started trickling out.

Shockingly for a game released over a decade later by another studio, Human Revolution has a lot in common with its granddaddy. Deus Ex wasn’t afraid to slather elaborate RPG elements onto an FPS experience, and happily, neither is the new sequel. Both games also have the kind of elaborate storytelling that leaves you scratching your head at times. But for me, the most shocking part is that both games seem equally at home on the PC.

No, really. Human Revolution shows almost no signs of consolitis. Fonts and user-interface elements are appropriately sized for a high-resolution display, and the graphics fit within a 16:10 form factor without letterboxing. Players are asked to mouse around inventory, character configuration, and log screens, where they’ll find themselves agonizing over how to spend upgrade points and, just like in the original, reshuffling inventory items to save space for new discoveries. To get a handle on the story, one is expected to read pages upon pages of intercepted e-mails, personal diaries, and e-book excerpts. Players can choose to master hacking, which involves figuring out the best path through a set of nodes and rapidly clicking your way through as a timer counts down, attempting to slow down a trace as you go along. Frankly, I can’t imagine slogging through so much writing on a TV screen or having to use a controller to hack security consoles. Even dialogue requires careful reading if you plan to use your “social enhancer” augmentation to get things your way.

You’ll find no trace of forgiving, console-friendly shooter gameplay, either. A few shots from even a weak future rent-a-cop will kill you dead, so you’ll need to be careful about whom to engage and when. Luckily, Human Revolution offers elaborate sneaking mechanics reminiscent of the Splinter Cell series. There’s a decent cover system, plus augmentations that let you peer through walls and tell you where enemies last saw you, so you can better flank them. The game gives you an XP bonus for sneaking through areas silently, stunning or tranquilizing enemies before they have a chance to alert their pals. Players with a more gung-ho attitude can load up on guns, grenades, and other deadly equipment if they so choose. One can even reprogram enemy turrets and robots to turn against their own team. There’s something strangely cathartic about flipping a turret’s allegiance switch from a remote security station, then hearing the faint sound of gunfire and seeing XP bonuses for downed enemies rapidly accumulate on the screen.

Somehow, Eidos Montreal has managed to retain much of the complexity of the first game, creating a true thinking man’s shooter-RPG hybrid. In today’s world of overly dumbed-down, cinematic RPG-lites and shooters on rails, that’s refreshing, to say the least.

And how could I forget the game’s open-world component? This is no Oblivion or Fallout 3, but the missions are spread out across large city hubs rife with explorable nooks and crannies, characters eager to dish out side quests, shops, and disaffected bums. The game starts out in Detroit and soon takes you to a massive, two-story Chinese city (you’ll see what I mean). I haven’t had time to play more, but I hear there will be further traveling.

Even within individual missions, the game usually gives you multiple routes to each objective. It’s up to you to determine which path will work best for your chosen play style. Folks big on stealth will want to scout rooftops and air vents, which can sometimes provide shortcuts straight through heavily guarded areas. Those shortcuts aren’t always easy to find, though. Rambo types can punch through walls and pelt bad guys with explosives, while more middle-of-the-road players may find themselves stalking guards on their patrols and knocking them out when they venture out on their own. Of course, you’re free to adjust your play style if you get bored—there’s nothing wrong with a little shooting spree after a few stealth missions.

I’m also quite impressed with the game’s visuals, but not for the usual reasons. Eidos Montreal has come up with a very unique graphical style, outfitting cyberpunk characters with neo-renaissance garb and letting them loose in decors that mix ultra-modern architecture and late-19th-century decor. An orange hue permeates most locales, and true to Deus Ex tradition, all of your missions take place at night. Blade Runner fans will be overjoyed. Again, it’s nice to see a game doing something different once in a while. I love titles like the Mass Effect series, but squeaky-clean futuristic environments and skin-tight combat suits are getting a little played out. Why can’t the future have weird, retro fashion and lots of orange lights everywhere? In Human Revolution, it does.

I’ll withhold my final verdict until I’ve completed the game. In essence, though, it seems Human Revolution beautifully captures the gameplay sophistication and atmosphere of the original game while making everything bigger, bolder, and more visually striking. Off the top of my head, I can only muster two complaints at this sequel. First, level load times are inconvenient at best and frustrating at worst—I’m talking a good 20-30 seconds per load on average, even after the latest patch. It doesn’t help that load screens appear every time you enter a new district, walk into a large building, or have to load a saved game because you got caught sneaking around. Also, while the voice acting works well (in spite of the main character’s overly gravely voice), wooden facial animations make the game’s many dialogue scenes a little dull to watch. All too often, you’re forced to stare at character models on the wrong side of the uncanny valley as their lips almost, but not quite, keep up with the recorded lines. If this took more after L.A. Noire, I’d be happier… but I suppose one game can’t do everything.

After sinking a good 10 hours or so into Human Revolution, though, I think I can tentatively say that this is one of 2011’s best PC games. I’d even be tempted to rank it up there with Portal 2. Few titles are that engrossing, and even fewer make the PC gamer crowd feel like first-class citizens.

Comments closed
    • Kaleid
    • 8 years ago

    Apparently a lot of cuts from the game was made to meet time restraints.
    [url<]http://www.trueachievements.com/n4768/deus-ex-human-revolution-needed-cuts.htm[/url<] [url<]http://www.vg247.com/2011/09/05/at-least-three-city-hubs-cut-from-deus-ex-human-revolution/[/url<]

    • Madman
    • 8 years ago

    I enjoy the game so far, I guess… I guess because the physics seem to be glitchy, which is very annoying and has caused multiple replays already.

    I am playing the game in nonlethal mode, and enemies that are knocked down die randomly by themselves after random time. Seems that ragdoll physics collides them with concrete floor or something.

    Had to restart missions 3 times because, after you’ve done the mission, turns out some of the knocked out characters are actually dead.

    The Deus Ex 1 is still the king though, I think. But I’m still in Detroit, so maybe I’ll change my mind later.

    • GrimDanfango
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve not played for very long, but the most surprising element that struck me about the game so far was how much it *feels* like a PC game. I’m talking slightly jerky hyperactive response to moving the mouse… where most multi-platform games, especially shooters, have a distinct feeling of being trapped behind a layer of spongey vague interface abstraction.
    It actually took me a good hour to re-adjust… at first I actually felt uneasy about the sensation of having such unrefined raw responsiveness. But I’ve gotten over it now, and I’m thoroughly enjoying sneaking my way through a game that at long last continues the sharp, smart tension of the early Thief games, and of course the original Deus Ex 🙂

    Even the third-person cover system seems to blend perfectly and feel entirely at home on PC. It feels far more like a useful tool than an arbitrary console-mandated restriction. You can use it as frequently or infrequently as you desire/require, in short bursts or continuously.

    I’m not overly concerned by texture resolution… the graphics are atmospheric, consistent and immersive, while not even attempting to be “cutting edge”. Let’s not forget Deus Ex 1 wasn’t exactly the most beautiful game at the time it was released. These graphics serve their purpose of supporting the game mechanics and story perfectly well. Even the physics engine seems to be as restrained and minimal as would adequately befit the game.

    In short… I think they hit all the right compromises, and invested their time in polishing the most important parts of the experience while not expending needless development time on gimmicks simply to cover marketing checkboxes. They’ve also done an exemplary job of making a cross-platform game without compromising the PC experience.

    • mako
    • 8 years ago

    Too bad my semester just started… I resolve to not think about Deus Ex until December.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 8 years ago

      *whisper* Come on…You know you want to.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      whats with you guys and starting school so damn early?

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve only just started playing, but I think this is pretty darn cool. I’m getting sucked in. Totally worth the (bargain) Amazon digital download price.

    • BlackStar
    • 8 years ago

    Anyone knows how well this plays on a E-350?

      • Chrispy_
      • 8 years ago

      I’d imagine “badly”

      Recommended spec is a quad-core with 4GB and a 5850.

      My guess is you’ll be able to get some kind of 20+ fps if you turn everything off, but is that a cost you’re willing to pay?

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah I’m going to have to agree with ‘badly’. I’ve got a Phenom 2 x4 @ 3.3ghz with a GTX460 768mb and it runs maxed out at 1920×1080, but I’d also guess ‘badly’ is subjective and dependent on your resolution.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      the 350 is surprisingly capable… idk…. probably not well, but you could check…

      • Madman
      • 8 years ago

      It plays fine on E6300 and GTX260

    • TAViX
    • 8 years ago

    To be honest, this game is way better than any game released in the last 2 years. I am surprised that is THAT good. I wonder, can someone make a …remake of the first Deus Ex using this engine. It will be awesome!!!

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    I wanted orange, but it gave me lemon-lime!

    I will give a cookie who can get this reference.

      • yogibbear
      • 8 years ago

      Err… Deus Ex? Not abstract enough from the article to make it hard. 😛

    • Thrashdog
    • 8 years ago

    I HAVE SEEN THE FNORDS

    • Decelerate
    • 8 years ago

    It’s definitely nice to see this being as successful as it is.

    As a Montrealer I am really happy to see another company replicating the success Ubisoft had oh so many years ago with Prince of Persia. Had this been horrible, it could’ve been their swan song (or death at birth).

    I never played the original deus ex nor System Shock, so I’m eager to dive in as soon as we roll onto the next month (bandwidth capped for August. Maybe I should go visit those things called “stores”)

    • spiked_mistborn
    • 8 years ago

    The original Deus Ex is still one of my favorite games of all time. I have great memories of playing that on my K6-III 450 with Voodoo2 SLI system that I had back then (still have all the parts, maybe I will build a working Win98 gaming system). I usually never preorder any games, but I preordered Human Revolution based on the word of a friend of mine who played the leaked version. He is very critical of games and he actually liked HR. So far it has a very similar feeling to the original, so this could shape up to be a great game.

    • JLW777
    • 8 years ago

    Played it for 3 hours since picked it up… I rank it ‘up there’ with Fallout 3 + Fallout:NV (Both games in which I hold in the highest regards) 😀 Now my starcraft 2 daily ranking grinding have to come to a halt. Nooooes…

    • Cyco-Dude
    • 8 years ago

    looks like another invisible war to me, to be honest. i’d like to be wrong, but it’s not shaping up that way so far.

      • Kaleid
      • 8 years ago

      Nope, it’s much better.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    From the sounds of third-part reviews, it looks like this game is a winner.

    I’m going wait until it goes on special on Steam.

    Video is related

    [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DAPXMZk2iw[/url<]

    • DrDillyBar
    • 8 years ago

    Fun Fun.

    • My Johnson
    • 8 years ago

    It’s called “steampunk.” The mix of cyberpunk and 19th century aesthetics.

      • Cyril
      • 8 years ago

      We’re getting into semantics here, but I believe steampunk normally implies an alternate history where Victorian-era science and engineering never went out of style. Deus Ex: HR takes place in a normal future with computers, electric cars, etc. where some of the fashion and interior decoration (not all of it) looks a little retro. But there’s definitely not an overwhelming Victorian aesthetic.

        • Thrashdog
        • 8 years ago

        I’d say aspect’s of David Sarif’s aesthetic — particularly his gilded prosthetic arm — draw heavily on the steampunk aesthetic, but by and large the game is all cyberpunk, all the time. The devs were even dropping references to Blade Runner and Robocop in the early sections of the game, and Lower Hengsha looks like Eidos Montreal broke into Shirow Masamune’s house and stole all the background art from Ghost in the Shell. The Baroque window dressing on top of all this is a just a nice little twist.

    • anotherengineer
    • 8 years ago

    I got a code for download with my new vid card. No time to play games.

    Anyone want to buy it? I have shogun II and CoD2 also…..I wish they would have just made the stuff cheaper, now I am stuck selling these games.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      how much you want for it?!
      i’m broke ass, but man, i want this game. let me know what you think would be fair, and i think we can work something out!
      deus ex, i mean….

      i gotta go out, but i’ll be back on later.

        • anotherengineer
        • 8 years ago

        For you 50 bucks lol

        I was/am hoping to get $25 for it, let me know.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          NM. Wife says EI cut me back 150$ a month now… money will be quite tight… going to school next month, so not going to get any fast cash. If any of these bros want it, Let em take it! Thanks for the offer though homie, it’s a damn good price!

          edit: lol plus 1! thanks bros!

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 8 years ago

    I guess I was wrong. I didn’t think that this game stood a chance. With none of the original talent involved I figured it was a cash-in, but I guess not. I’ve never been so happy to be wrong though.

      • cupojava
      • 8 years ago

      This game is absolutely brilliant. It also takes 30-40 hours to finish. What more could you ask for? 🙂

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 years ago

    Every review so far has begged me to get this game.

    Thanks, Cyril, for another. This went on the Wolf’s list as an eleventh-hour birthday gift for next week.

    • thesmileman
    • 8 years ago

    “No, really. Human Revolution shows almost no signs of consolitis.”

    I LOVE this game but the textures show huge loads of consolitis. So many of the textures are flat our horrible for a PC game.

    While I absolutely love this game I really which they would create a high resolution texture pack for the PC

      • CaptTomato
      • 8 years ago

      GFX are putting me off bigtime.

    • Legend
    • 8 years ago

    Portal 2 aside, I’ve not had as much fun and satisfaction within a game since Fallout 3. The extra flair more than makes up for the few game play mechanic blunders.

    • Hrunga Zmuda
    • 8 years ago

    Deus Ex with a chaser of Rage in October. I put Windows 7 on an SSD in my Mac Pro for these two games. Looks like a great Fall comin’ along here.

    • juampa_valve_rde
    • 8 years ago

    Pheewwww… i was afraid that human revolution could be as cheap as invisible war, but the reviews everywhere are talking nice bout, much like the first one, even with nice graphics, i have to play it 🙂 sweeeeeeettta!!

    • timaeus
    • 8 years ago

    I’m really loving this game so far, though it will be a couple of weeks before I’m really able to sink my teeth into it. I am glad it was released *before* I’d be home-bound for a week after foot surgery. It will be a good game to occupy my time while I’m stuck at home recovering.

    • Malphas
    • 8 years ago

    “Personality type: Alpha, Beta, Omega”? Sounds like some Ubisoft Montreal developers have been spending too long on “PUA” loser self-help forums.

      • cupojava
      • 8 years ago

      It’s to gauge what type of personality the person has in order to release targeted pheromones to convince them.

      Also this categorization stuff is in freshmen year psychology books.

      As to what kind of forums you’ve been hanging around, we don’t want to know.

    • swaaye
    • 8 years ago

    The game is fantastic. Don’t miss it if you at all enjoyed its predecessors. I wasn’t sure that the industry was willing to make another scifi game like this. Kudos to Eidos Montreal.

    • Jigar
    • 8 years ago

    Ever played the game Witcher 2 that released this year ?

    • squeeb
    • 8 years ago

    “There’s something strangely cathartic about flipping a turret’s allegiance switch from a remote security station, then hearing the faint sound of gunfire and seeing XP bonuses for downed enemies rapidly accumulate on the screen.”

    Haha, I love it.

    Yep, great game..enjoying it a lot.

    • ChronoReverse
    • 8 years ago

    The patch that came out yesterday dropped my load times from 20ish seconds to about seconds =)

      • cupojava
      • 8 years ago

      The patch took my load time from 20 seconds to 2-3 seconds.

    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    man, i want this game too. Number 2 isn’t BAD, it’s just not as good as the first. if you never played the first, you’d think it was a damn good game. it’s worth picking up if you’ve got time to kill. one of the first games with physx!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    have to see about getting this one.

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      Thats kind of how I felt about it. I didn’t mind Invisible War. I just struggled with seeing how they exactly fit together.

      • Kaleid
      • 8 years ago

      Thief 3 and Deus Ex 2 used HAVOK as far as I know..
      I agree, it’s not really that of a bad game, many levels create good atmospheres (much thanks to being one the first games with decent shadow/lighting engines) and the music is good.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        you’re right. i’m an idiot it was havok.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 8 years ago

          If I recall, it was horribly badly implemented Havok… you could accidentally propel the gelatinous ragdolls into orbit if you happened to cough too loudly 😛

          Just one of a hundred badly implemented features in that game.
          The mistake they seemed to make was in apeing Deus Ex 1, without actually realising what made it good. They just built a bunch of generic levels, and provided an air-vent and a hackable computer terminal and a guard/robot for each corridor… because that was what Deus Ex 1 was all about.
          The story also felt like a fan-fiction “tribute” to the original. A badly conceived continuation.

          Deus Ex 3 appears to have been created by a team who genuinely understand what made the original great, and have sought to build upon it’s mechanics to serve their own vision of the world, and their own exploration of the issues and politics of that world.

          It’s a vastly more mature approach to continuing a franchise.

            • Kaleid
            • 8 years ago

            Yes, they decided that the physics should be more fun rather than realistic, which is a mistake in my view. DX: HE is not perfect on this either. The world is more static than the first one, lots of objects cannot be moved at all and not broken either. So, DX: HE feels more “dead” to me.

            DX: HE physics aren’t that great either to honest. Pick up a refrigerator and throw it, it is like it has no weight at all. Same with Xerox copiers, no weight to them. Carrying turrets however is well done, as it is slow and consumes energy.

            Because of the automated nature of certain things in DX: HE it can be difficult to just target one person:
            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPvAe86KyWg[/url<] __ Dance, dance revolution: [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y414Q7vVgYU[/url<] Dance all you want, but the original is still the best.

            • GrimDanfango
            • 8 years ago

            I don’t think the physics in DX:IW were really intended to be ‘fun’… I think they just got carried away with a new toy and didn’t bother to put the time in to actually integrate it properly. By contrast, Half Life 2 came out at a similar time, used Havok, and utilised it perfectly.

            DX:HE physics aren’t all that flamboyant, but I don’t find they detract from the game. I think you may be looking back at DX1 with slightly nostalgia-tinted glasses – try playing it now, and you’d probably be surprised just how restrained its physics engine was… the world was detailed and interesting, but it wasn’t especially “dynamic” as we understand it these days.

            I get the impression that the DX:HE team really made a point of aiming to keep the emergent physics craziness on a leash, and work to the design philosophy of the original. There’s a lot of detail, a lot of choice, and a lot of branching possibilities throughout the levels, but it’s tightly controlled.
            Many great games live and breath on their emergent gameplay, but in the case of Deus Ex, I think they realised in a highly narrative-driven game that expending resources developing elaborate physics simulations/interactions, and subsequently needing to design puzzles/levels around them would detract from the story more than it would aid it.

            I reckon they made precisely the right call, and a lot of developers could learn from them.

            • Kaleid
            • 8 years ago

            You can pick up almost anything and destroy them in DX1, and it had gibbing too. Of course it didn’t have ragdoll and the advanced physics we have today but it was more interactive for sure.

            I remember reading an interview shortly after DX2 came out, and they said that they toyed with the idea of making the physics more realistic but made the more “fun” choice. My guess the marketing people asked, eh, demanded it.

            There is no need to design physics puzzles, all too many games have this. But when an explosion occurs it can be nice to see things flying around, because that is what we expect them to do.

            I think the reason has more to do with the player not picking up useless crap and to keep bandwidth available for other things. I also think the textures are somewhat lowres for performance reasons plus they wanted to keep level loads fewer in numbers.

            HL2 in my view used physics a bit too much, with barrels placed just beside an NPC so that we can see the ragdolls flying around.

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 8 years ago

            I’m pretty sure HL2 does not use Havok, but rather Valve made their own physics engine.

            • GrimDanfango
            • 8 years ago

            From [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Source_(game_engine)[/url<] "Havok Physics, albeit heavily modified" ...so it appears we're both right... partially 😛

      • EsotericLord
      • 8 years ago

      Nice to see someone else that doesn’t hate Invisible War. I played it without playing the 1st one and thought it was a pretty awesome game.

      HR is pretty cool too, but theres a few quest bugs that need to be worked out. Framerate likes to randomly stutter during non-action scenes as well, and I can’t figure out if its just me or my GPU.

        • yokem55
        • 8 years ago

        Same here. I liked Invisible War enough. It certainly was more than good enough, it just wasn’t as good as the original game. The unified ammo was really dumb and the tiny levels optimized for the original Xbox were a big letdown, and I still miss the skill points system (missing in Human Revolution too :(.) But otherwise it was a perfectly respectable game.

          • swaaye
          • 8 years ago

          The thing about the Xbox being blamed for the level size is that there are other UE2 games on Xbox that do not have this problem. Part of the reason for the tiny areas is likely related to their use of stencil shadows, which as you know from Doom3 have to be tightly controlled or they will destroy the CPU.

          DXIW seems to have been a smattering of bad decisions in general.
          [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGIdYl2oN74[/url<] I'm working on a play through myself. It's a decent game. But the scale of the areas is cheesy, the gameplay choices obvious as hell and the number of loading screens is just pure silly. The dynamic lighting/shadowing is cool though even if it is part of the problem.

            • Kaleid
            • 8 years ago

            I read somewhere that code took up 3/4 of the Xbox 1 RAM. They succeeded however in making the levels for Thief 3 much bigger.

    • bfar
    • 8 years ago

    The evolution of gaming story telling peaked ten years ago with the astounding first Deus Ex. It is such a crying shame that studios, instead of building on the shoulders of that giant, embarked on a strategy of creating simpler, generic, genre led titles; a phenomia sometimes unfairly branded as ‘consolization’. They shunned the complexity that is necessary to evolve gaming to the euphoric hights that have occaisionally been achieved by other artistic mediums.

    I am absolutely delighted to see the release of human revolution, and even happier to see how it’s being received by what is now a much bigger community. I sincerely hope that this time, publishers will respond by pushing the bar yet higher.

    It’s also wonderful to see the PC version get the proper professional treatment it deserves. Full kudos for Eidos for this; they have listened to their customers and it is genuinely appreciated. For too long many large publishers have ignored the PC platform, to the detriment of themseleves, and indeed the paying consumer.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 8 years ago

    I’m jazzed to get into this game.

    • ModernPrimitive
    • 8 years ago

    Thanks for the article Cyril. I’ll have to look into this and see how it might run on my Envy 14 @ 16×9…..been itching for a game and didn’t want to revisit Fallout 3 again.

      • dymelos
      • 8 years ago

      You won’t regret it. I am running an Envy 17 and it runs really well on it. So glad that they stayed so true to the original for this.

    • Corrado
    • 8 years ago

    I am excited to pick this up. Will have to wait for payday though as I sunk my fun budget for August into a $150 32gb TouchPad.

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 8 years ago
        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago
      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      WHAT DID YOU SAY?!!??!?! 2 POSTS DELETED??!?!?!

        • Cyril
        • 8 years ago

        Rule #1.

          • grantmeaname
          • 8 years ago

          Don’t talk about fight club.

        • PrincipalSkinner
        • 8 years ago

        It’s a browser error. 😀

        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago

        he suggested the yarrr delivery service. I said i considered it but am choosing not to. We also said disparaging personal attacks on you 😛

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          well, the attacks on me are normal around here. they’re even sanctioned by cyril. he has a long history of jealously, ever since scott declared me his favorite employee. since we’re pretty much the same age, he views me as a threat to his inheritance of everything tr. Everyone knows scott wouldn’t leave it to geoff, so it’s a contest mostly between me and cyril.

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      I bugged the wifey to let me spend my allowance early. I do not regret it. Game is AWESOME, and quite a deal @ $35 via Amazon direct download. Its fairly hard though. I’m enjoying it.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        my wife isn’t so kind. how did you get an allowance? that’s a trick i need to learn!

          • Corrado
          • 8 years ago

          I was all like, “HEY! MISSY! YOU GET YOUR BITCHASS BACK IN THE KITCHEN! AND MAKE ME SOME PIE!”

          In reality, I just said “Hey, I’m spending money on this game before the sale is over. If I don’t, its going to cost $15 more.” She saw the logic in that.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            my wife says “you can’t buy every good deal, if you did, we’d be broke. You just might have to miss that one”. and then i’m like “but.. bu…. ok…. i guess….”

            • Palek
            • 8 years ago

            I would imagine that, you being you, you just spam/troll her into submission.

            😉

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      Look on the bright side, by the time you can grab it most of the bugs and issues will be ironed out. 😉

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