A couple of months with Corsair’s Vengeance M60 mouse

It all started with a failing microswitch.

It was the spring of 2011, and I was a perfectly contented MX1100 user. Logitech’s latest high-end mouse had treated me well for the previous 12 months, and I was looking forward to many more years of happy use. I loved the shape of the thing. I was enthralled by its soft, punctured rubber grips and the slick, smooth plastic bulge that nestled itself in the crook of my hand. And all those buttons! Oh my. Gleefully, I adjusted DPI levels on the fly, squeezed the free-wheeling toggle to scroll down long Excel documents, and wiggled my thumb to move through my browser history.

Then the left button started registering single clicks as double clicks. The mouse basically became useless.

I e-mailed Logitech support. They told me the MX1100 wasn’t in production anymore. Instead, they sent me a Performance Mouse MX, which turned out to be a pretty lousy downgrade. I wrote a whole blog post to moan and whine about it in May of last year, and you can go read it if you’re bored. To sum up, the Performance Mouse MX wasn’t as comfortable as the MX1100. It didn’t have hardware DPI buttons, and it had a shoddy wheel that misinterpreted middle-clicks as attempts to side-scroll half the time. The mouse made up for the missing or botched features with a pointless multitasking thumb button and a “zoom” button I never used. Ugh.

In that old blog post, I pleaded with TR gerbils to recommend a replacement. I badly wanted to ditch Logitech, but I had no idea what else to buy. Reviews for gaming mice from other vendors mentioned nagging little issues, and my desire for a wireless rodent severely limited my options. I spent hours digging through user reviews and message boards. I hummed and hawed and cringed and fretted.

Finally, like anyone who’s suffered through a bad relationship, I hung my head and crawled back into the unloving arms of my abuser. I bought a Logitech G700. I told myself that, this time, things would turn out better. This time, I wouldn’t find myself regretting my purchase a year down the line. The thing had a five-year warranty, for heaven’s sake.

The G700’s left button only took eight months to fail. It failed just like the MX1100’s left button had failed, by suddenly and irreparably starting to double-click when I only meant to click once. By then, however, a faulty left button was the last of my worries. The G700’s small, relatively narrow body had wreaked havoc on my right hand and arm, and long Battlefield 3 sessions exacerbated things to a dangerous extent. I just couldn’t go on. I had to find another mouse. My whole right arm, from fingers to shoulder, was a throbbing, tingling mess. I didn’t experience actual pain, but the discomfort literally kept me up at night.

So I tried Corsair’s Vengeance M60.

The M60 is wired. After almost a decade of wireless mousing, that was a difficult adjustment. I almost gave up. I would have, too, were it not for the M60’s shape: wide. Really wide. This mouse is wider than the G700, and it’s wider than all the Logitech mice I’ve used so far. Logitech’s G9x is pretty close, but I understand it’s slightly narrower. (I’ve never used it, though.)

After a couple of weeks using the Corsair mouse, that crippling tingling in my arm subsided. It still rears its head when I have to use another mouse on one of my test rigs, but I think the M60’s wider shape encouraged a healthier hand posture that untangled trapped nerves and warded off further injury. I don’t have particularly large hands or long fingers, but the G700 always felt too narrow, somehow. I find my hand rests more naturally on the M60, with less muscle tension involved.

The M60 doesn’t just feel great to hold. It also feels great to use. The buttons have a nice, solid, chunky click to them, and they’re positioned just right. The back and forward buttons rest just above my thumb, safely out of the way but not too far out of reach. Corsair has put a red sniper button on the side, too, which you can press and hold to temporarily decrease the tracking speed. You have to stretch your thumb forward a little to reach it—but not too much. And the DPI switch buttons have a gap between them, so you can be sure you’ll never hit the wrong one by accident.

I’m also delighted with the middle click. Middle clicking properly on the G700 and Performance Mouse MX involved pushing down at an exact angle. If I strayed too far from that angle, I’d hear the same familiar click, but the mouse would think I was trying to scroll to the side. When I tried to close a tab or load a bookmark, the mouse would essentially ignore my command and do nothing. Pretty frustrating. The M60 gets around that problem by taking side-scrolling out of the picture altogether. It’s an unfortunate tradeoff, but I’ll take reliable middle-clicking over side-scrolling any day. Logitech’s side-scrolling implementation is a little unpredictable, anyhow.

One wheel feature from Logitech mice that I do miss is the free-wheeling toggle. Scrolling down long Excel spreadsheets on the M60 can feel sluggish, and I often end up manually dragging the scroll bar, instead.

The M60 sits atop five Teflon pads that help the mouse glide smoothly, silently, and effortlessly across my desk. Well, they did at first. The feet wore down after a couple of months of heavy use. Now, there’s noticeably more friction, and the M60 makes more noise when it’s dragged around. The G700 didn’t fare any better on my wooden desk, so I suppose I shouldn’t complain. I guess I should probably just grab one of those fancy pro gamer mouse pads with an unpronounceable name and a scary price tag. But my desk is cluttered enough as it is.

To make tracking even swifter, Corsair lets you take out three 4-gram weights from the bottom of the mouse. Each weight sits in its own little silo, behind a little manhole cover that can be unscrewed with a coin, screwdriver, or sufficiently overgrown fingernail. I’ve been using heavy wireless mice weighed down by batteries forever, so I kept the weights in at first. I think I like how light and nimble the M60 feels with the weights out, though.

There’s another thing I wish I had done sooner. For some strange reason, Corsair saw fit to install a bright, blue LED light just behind the scroll wheel. The light illuminates the bottom of my monitors and everything else in its path. The only way to disable it is to install the Corsair Vengeance software, which has a little toggle option at the top of the main control panel window. Problem is, I didn’t install the software until a few weeks in, because all the buttons worked just fine out of the box, and I have no use for Corsair’s fancy macro recording features and DPI tweaks. So, for several weeks, I endured the inexplicably bright blue LED, quietly wishing Corsair had put a switch under the mouse to disable it.

Oh, and the wheel click broke on my unit last week. Since I’ve never had a wheel actually break on any mouse ever, I assume—hope—that was just a fluke. The mouse does carry a two-year warranty, anyway.

Despite the kinks, I’m happy with the M60. I’m delighted that my right arm doesn’t feel like bugs are crawling inside it anymore, and I’m overjoyed that I’ve finally found such a capable substitute for my old MX1100. I do wish Corsair made a wireless version of the M60, but over these past two months, I’ve learned to live with the cord. It’s a nice cord, too—braided and everything, and there’s even a little Velcro tie to bundle it together. Only time will tell if the M60’s buttons (the left button, especially) endure my intensive usage regimen. You’ll probably see another blog post from me in a year or two addressing that very topic. For now, I’d happily recommend the Vengeance M60 to anyone who wants a solid, comfortable mouse for gaming and general productivity work. At $69.99 before a $10 mail-in rebate, it’s quite reasonably priced, too.

Comments closed
    • Airmantharp
    • 7 years ago

    I must be weird, but I haven’t use the ‘middle-click’ available in most mice for over a decade. That is, since mouse wheels were introduced.

    My G500 has three thumb buttons, so you could map whatever function you need to the third while preserving forward/back, and the ‘free scrolling’ ability of the scroll wheel is amazing. It’s the one thing I miss on my Steelseries Sensei.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      I only use it in games. It’s my knife button in BF3, 600 and counting. 🙂

    • chrissodey
    • 7 years ago

    I have been very happy with my Gigabyte GM-M8000X. For a $60.00 mouse it is a steal.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    Cyril, Cyril, Cyril,

    Get this
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      • chrissodey
      • 7 years ago

      I get more strain from the Evoluent mice then I do from my gaming mouse. I’m also not sure why they cost so much.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      That thing looks great for office use, but for gaming?

      It looks too big/bulky for quick, accurate movements, and the sensor capabilities aren’t listed anywhere.

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    Razor DeathAdder Black Edition. No fancy buttons everywhere. Wired. Light. Perfect. Never looked back. Not even expensive.

      • Firestarter
      • 7 years ago

      I have a Deathadder too and I like it a lot. It really does not like uneven surfaces though, so you need to make sure your mousepad is 100% flat.

      edit: Also, you absolutely do not need to install any drivers! The mouse defaults to 1800 DPI and 500hz polling rate if you just plug it in. Lower DPI might be useful if you’re a low sensitivity player though.

    • Corrado
    • 7 years ago

    I recently picked up an MS IntelliMouse Explorer 3.0 Legends Edition at Best Buy for $14.99 on clearance. It replaced my Logitech MX Revolution that I absolutely loved. It took about a week of getting used to going back to a wired mouse, but now I absolutely love it.

      • AssBall
      • 7 years ago

      +1 In my opinion there are no better feeling more reliable mice than the intellimouse explorers.

        • Captain Ned
        • 7 years ago

        I won’t buy anything else.

    • KorruptioN
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve used Logitech mice way back to the original MX500 which I thought was perfect. I’ve since used a bunch of different models but I had to go back to the formula that worked for me. Logitech even promotes it as a successor to the MX518 (which built on the MX510 and MX500). Affordable, too.

    [url<]http://www.logitech.com/en-ca/gaming/mice-keyboard-combos/optical-gaming-mouse-g400[/url<]

      • Firestarter
      • 7 years ago

      The G400 is a great choice, do be sure you avoid the first production run though as the sensor/firmware of those mice have built-in prediction that you cannot disable. The later G400’s don’t have that problem.

        • KorruptioN
        • 7 years ago

        Looks like I have prediction. Not totally sure what it is (I’ve never really noticed), but it hasn’t bothered me.

          • Firestarter
          • 7 years ago

          [url<]http://i.imgur.com/T98Ay.jpg[/url<] You can see the difference there, with the MX518 having prediction and the MS IE 3.0 not. Without prediction, it's pretty much impossible to draw straight lines, because you do not move the mouse in a straight line. A mouse that does prediction (or angle snapping as it is more accurately called) will 'correct' your squiggly line into a straight line. Depending on where this 'correction' happens (firmware, drivers), it will most definitely change the way your input is interpreted. It will, for example, interpret you moving the mouse to the right and slightly down as you moving the mouse to the right in a straight line. To find out if your mouse does prediction, you can try and draw a straight line in a paint program. If you manage to do so rather easily, you can assume that the mouse was doing it for you.

    • FranzVonPapen
    • 7 years ago

    Looks like a nice design, but the recent reviews (from 7/2012) on Newegg almost all pan the software as unusable. Staggering number of RMAs, too.

    Someday I’ll need to replace my ailing Logitech G5, but the middle-click isn’t [i<]quite[/i<] dead yet...

      • Waco
      • 7 years ago

      The software works just fine IMHO.

    • TheEmrys
    • 7 years ago

    Is it ambidextrous? I’m looking for a good replacement for my venerable MX310. I just did a quick look. Looks like I’ve used it for 9 years. No wonder it looks so…. worn. But, its replacement must be ambidextrous. I mouse left handed, but with a right handed configuration for the left click-right click.

    • deb0
    • 7 years ago

    I have use and love the Logitech g700. I”ve had it for over 6 months, use with a Func 1030 mousepad. The combo is silky smoove, yet accurate.

    This corsair mouse looks interesting, but I cannot see anything from the review that would warrant me to fire my g700. Looks good though.

    • Goofus Maximus
    • 7 years ago

    All my logitech mice have died the same way yours did. When you open them up afterwards, you can see where the plastic strip on the underside of the mouse button develops a notch, where it comes in contact with the switch.

    They could avoid this just by putting a metal strip or cap in place of the plastic, or by designing the switch to have a greater area of contact. I’ve had some success in extending the life of these mice, by filing down the plastic, and gluing a piece of metal from a small paperclip or staple in it’s place.

    • indeego
    • 7 years ago

    My issue with this mouse are the angles. The G500 has very smooth angles between thumb and rest of hand. This mouse looks like it will build calusses/nip you once in a while. Just the bottom edge alone tells me to stay far away.

      • Firestarter
      • 7 years ago

      I use a G500 every day at work, no problems and definitely no callouses (as if!)

    • d0g_p00p
    • 7 years ago

    Can anyone chime in on the state of wireless mice (Cyril?) and gaming? The only thing that has kept me from getting a wireless is the lag with wireless. All wireless mice I have tried had a laggy feel that made the mouse pointer not match up to where I expected it to be on screen if that makes any sense. Granted it’s been a few years since I have tried a wireless mouse I just wonder if that issue has been fixed.

    edit: jitter, skip and drift is what I was trying to say when describing the lag issues with a wireless mouse.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      That hasn’t been a real issue for some time. Wireless technologies always have lag, but it’s been reduced too far to be noticeable by most people. The real disadvantage is lower DPI since you have to conform to a wireless standard resulting in a lower data rate than USB.

      That being said, if you feel like there was a lag, you will probably never have a wireless mouse meet your needs. If you feel it, you feel it. I’ve heard the same complaints about Xbox 360 controllers for extra-fast paced games. It’s not nearly as significant as some would make it out, but if you think it’s there, you’ll probably be happier sticking with wired input devices.

      EDIT: since you edited…I haven’t seen any of that exclusive to wireless mice, either.

      I should also add that wireless “gaming” mice need batteries…something you don’t want to change/charge in the middle of a match.

        • d0g_p00p
        • 7 years ago

        Awesome info, thank you.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]If you feel it, you feel it. I've heard the same complaints about Xbox 360 controllers for extra-fast paced games.[/quote<] FWIW, MLG has standardized on wired controllers. So for sure, at least some people feel a difference. Personally I don't feel a difference. I use a wired Xbox 360 controller on my PC and Bluetooth controllers on the PS3 and they all feel instantaneous. That doesn't mean the lag isn't there, it just means I'm too slow (read: too old?) to notice it.

        • Laykun
        • 7 years ago

        I do not believe DPI has anything to do with data rate. I think you mean update rate of the mouse as opposed to DPI. DPI is simply how sensitive the laser is to positional change, which does nothing to increase bandwidth usage.

        I’ve been sitting on a 1600 DPI MX-518 for about half a decade now and I bet I could use it to wipe the floor with you in Quake 3, so DPI really isn’t much of an issue, it does not improve your game.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      I’ve never used a ‘gaming’ wireless mouse, as that’s too much of an investment for something that may not work as I need it. My other wireless mice all have lag, and they’re new.

      • indeego
      • 7 years ago

      The first time a wireless mouse has a weak signal/low battery was the last time I used one. Seems like all the convenience went out the window with that inconvenience.

        • travbrad
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah it’s not like most people use their PC (or even play PC games) 10ft away from their PC either. I can see the appeal for console controllers where you may not want to have a cable going 10ft across your room, but with a mouse it’s almost always going to be right next to your PC anyway.

        I guess wireless mice are slightly less bulky to carry around with a laptop, but most people carry their laptops in bags anyway.

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          I carry a wireless mouse with my laptop…much better than a trackpad…

          The issue I have with wired keyboards and mice is how to set up the wires so they don’t rub on anything or get snagged. That does not trump my needs for wired peripherals, but it’s definitely a pro for wireless mice, etc.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            This has not been an issue for me at all, and I even have a standing desk with cords everywhere.

      • BKA
      • 7 years ago

      G700…wireless or wired. Love it!

    • thesmileman
    • 7 years ago

    I used to swear by the MX518’s but for the last three years the G500 is without a doubt the best out their and not too expensive.

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      I love my G500, but I had to replace it on my workstation with a Steelseries Sensei. The G500 is about perfect except for it’s 5700dpi sensor which just doesn’t seem to cut it at 2560×1600. It made the game feel choppy, though it’s still a dream to use at 1920×1080.

      • indeego
      • 7 years ago

      G500 is quite nice, but I’ve had the toggle for the middle button click/smooth get messed up a few times at home and work. It goes away eventually.

    • d0g_p00p
    • 7 years ago

    Cyril, a good cheap gaming grade mouse pad I would recommend is the Func Surface1030. It’s small, very thin and can be had for under $20. It also has 2 different surfaces. One slick and smooth and the other very fine “grit” like surface. No logo’s or extreme branding. Take a look at it.

      • Firestarter
      • 7 years ago

      I have the Func Surface 1030 and although I like it a lot, the feet on the pad holder thingie wore away after .. 1.5 years or so? Anyhow, that made the pad slide and wobble, so I got some of that dollar-store stuff that stops rugs from slipping, cut it up and taped it on the rough side of the mouse pad, works great 🙂

    • Philldoe
    • 7 years ago

    Talk about choosing the wrong mouse… Your first mistake was buying anything but an MX518. Your next mistake was buying a G700 over a G500. Even if you really really wanted wireless you should have caved in and went with the right mouse in the first place. My MX518 lasted me a few years before the left click quit registering. The G500 (which I only picked over an MX518 because they were no longer being sold) has been chugging for a couple of years now with no issues. I think here in a few years when the G500 finally gives out I’ll buy another G500.

      • Firestarter
      • 7 years ago

      While the MX518 was and is a great mouse, it is definitely not a perfect mouse. For one, it does not officially support high USB polling rates, and it has built-in acceleration and prediction.

        • Philldoe
        • 7 years ago

        I never said it was perfect, I just said it was the wrong choice to pick anything else 😛

    • ap70
    • 7 years ago

    I am with yo brother.
    I love my MX, got the double click problem and just had it fixed by opening it and air spraying.
    I am always wondering why Logitech killed it. Why companies make stupid moves?
    This mouse has no replacement.

      • ChronoReverse
      • 7 years ago

      I’ve fixed the double-click issue by clean the microswitch too (I used a single drop of oil though).

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    What strikes me out of all of this is how hard you are on mice. Oh, and you’re recommending a model that you broke the wheel on hoping it was a “fluke”.

    All the more reason nobody can touch my MX518 until long after I’m dead. The MX1100 looked OK, I guess, and the Performance MX – scary. But the MX518 is amazing.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, I haven’t had an input peripheral break in any way for the last ten years. The MX518 I’m using is going on 6 years and still works fine.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        I had an MX310 for around 6 years before it just started acting weird, but 6 years with a mouse was enough to make me jump on the MX518 as the replacement. In between I tried an Microsoft Comfort Optical Mouse 3000 and it was just awful from the get-go. Went back to the store in just a couple of days. The 518 is awesome, though.

        • travbrad
        • 7 years ago

        The only one I’ve had break was a Logitech steering wheel (driving force pro), and it still worked electronically just the Force Feedback motor broke. I’m honestly surprised it lasted as long as it did though, since I drove 50,000miles in Live For Speed alone, plus a lot of other games.

        My Logitech mouse/mic/joystick/controller are all still working great.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 7 years ago

      I occasionally get the idea to buy a new mouse, just because. I look around to see what’s available, and find there’s always SOMETHING lacking compared to the MX518. The only exception right now appears to be the Logitech G400….which is a clone of the MX518.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Be thankful you’ve never used a G9x. It has a deliciously comfortable shape (especially with a choice of shells) but I’m on my third under warranty with its build quality issues and a middle-click that is practically unusable.

    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Hmmm… not sure I’d take the dive on that mouse. I’ve always been a fan of Razer mice, but their hardware has gotten progressively worse over the years to the point that you’re essentially buying a device you know will fail in two years and it’ll be out of warranty. My current Lachesis is starting to suffer from poor tracking and the single-double click that you mentioned when the switch goes out.

    It’s really sad because I love the shape and aesthetics of Razer mice. I’ve tried getting used to a Logitech mouse, but it just doesn’t do it for me. I palm my mice and don’t rest my whole hand on it so it makes it really difficult to change over to a Logitech mouse that you ride. I tried the Rat 7 too, but that ended up being a uncomfortable endeavor even after adjusting it and tweaking it.

    I was torn and at a loss honestly. But you guys talked about the Sharkoon Darkglider a few months ago and honestly I think that’s a winner for me. It combines great aesthetics and shape with new gutts that don’t rely on sensors that either Razer or Logitech use, which means they might be quite good.

    It’s also made in germany for what that’s worth. It finally made it to amazon.uk, but they don’t have distribution channels in the US yet. 🙁

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      I haven’t yet found anything that feels better than a Razer mouse…then again, I don’t see a lot of places with mice on display to cop a feel, which is the best indicator of whether a mouse will work or not. That reason alone is why I got my first Deathadder in 2009. Since then I’ve gotten a Naga and a Blackwidow (paid for with credit card points) that have been excellent.

        • Bensam123
        • 7 years ago

        Bestbuy is the best place to go and feel up mice (one of the few uses for the store). I agree about the feel for Razer mice, but there are a lot of people that downright hate them. That and the newer Razer mice are all starting to mimmick Logitechs curved hand mouse. I really liked their palm designs.

        Aesthetics have always been great too, but since the Copperhead line I’ve just been having more and more trouble with them. I owned a Boomslang, Viper, Diamondback, Copperhead, and I’m on my Lachesis

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          BBuy is where I tried a Deathadder…before buying on Newegg XD

          And I’ve been hearing that about troubles. I haven’t really seen much. It took three years of heavy use before things started to really wear on my Deathadder (I think I can still use it without MB5). Although I did get a “free” keyboard (Arctosa or something) that had TERRIBAD drivers. Yet I’ve had zero driver problems on my Blackwidow…weird.

            • Airmantharp
            • 7 years ago

            I’ve heard all kinds of issues with Razor’s built quality and reliability, but yeah, the Blackwidow Ultimate I picked up is rock solid.

            I want the new version with the Browns of course though.

            For mice, I’m Logitech all the way, except on my gaming rig where having a 2560×1600 resolution in BF3 necessitated a mouse with higher sensitivity- and that was Steelseries’ Sensei with it’s 11,600 CPI. The 5700 DPI on my G500 just wasn’t enough.

    • Firestarter
    • 7 years ago

    Any word on whether this mouse has any kind of built-in acceleration, prediction or other sensor quality issues? AFAIK this mouse has the ADNS-9500 sensor, which is suspected of having slight built-in acceleration (that you cannot disable). I haven’t been able to find any hard proof though.

    • FormCode
    • 7 years ago

    Talking about mice and build quality, I’ve had a Razer Salmosa since 2009, pretty basic stuff but the lil’ bugger’ still going strong, clicks still register fine, tracking is spot on, wheel clicks like in the 1st day. Only problem i’ve had with it was that for the first few weeks my left click squeaked 🙂 But I can see this mouse lasting me a few more years at least.

    • Saribro
    • 7 years ago

    Finding mice which are actually large enough is indeed problematic these days, even more so for wireless models. I used to have an MX1000. It was excellent, but then the receiver prevented my system from booting. Now I have 2 M500’s, which are acceptable, but I also had to go wired due to lack of options. That Dell thing I have at work is junk.
    I wonder why the designers of these new mini-thingies never actually try to use them, it would quickly become apparent that they are unusable and literally -painful-.

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    Not all gamer mousepads are huge, and not all of them are very expensive either (especially if you’re already looking for smaller variants due to desk clutter). Might be worth it.

    Grease and skin cells wouldn’t stick to your mouse anymore either, like they seem to do on a bare desk.

    • evilnickwong
    • 7 years ago

    I feel you on the anguish with the middle click buttons. In recent times, having the scroll wheel perform double duty as a side-to-side clicker meant the middle click was really hard to use on a lot of mice from Logitech. I had the M705 Marathon which had a similar problem, and as with your experience the M950 Performance MX also, which is why I did not buy it.

    However, I did end up getting the G700 and I have had ZERO problems with it. I’m convinced it’s the best mouse I’ve used yet. I even had the much more expensive Mamba 4G for awhile and still prefer this G700. No problems using the middle click, love the customization (different profiles for different apps which is also very very useful for work) and I haven’t had any ergonomics issues either. For reference, I do generally prefer larger mice and with the G700, it’s pretty comfortable.

    • aurnob
    • 7 years ago

    yes, all very true coments. have had this mouse for past couple of months. first thing you notice is the really nice build quality and feel of the mouse. soft ware is pretty comprehensive as welll.

      • Madman
      • 7 years ago

      Looks like a knock of of Rat 7/9, that was the first impression.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        not sure why you got -1’d, that certainly is my impression as well. Looks just like a MadCatz RAT mouse.

          • Waco
          • 7 years ago

          Except it’s built a LOT better.

          I used one for a month or so before switching to an EpicGear Meduza. It is, by far, the most comfortable mouse I’ve ever touched (the Meduza). It makes the M60 feel nearly uncomfortable in comparison.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            That’s a depressing statement on the build quality of the RAT mice – Cyril managed to break his M60 and have the Teflon wear off over the course of a few months.

            • Waco
            • 7 years ago

            My M60 still looks and works like it’s brand new, my fiancee has been using it daily after I stopped. RAT mice really are pretty terrible though.

          • Meadows
          • 7 years ago

          Looks nothing like it. The only thing they have in common is probably that they’re both angular.

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