Strung out on Borderlands 2

This isn’t easy for me to say, so I’ll just come right out with it: I have a Borderlands 2 problem. Thanks to playing until the wee hours of the morning several nights this week, I’m running a serious sleep deficit. I kept telling myself the late nights were necessary to get a good enough sense of the game to write this blog post, but that’s only partly true. The fact is I’m an addict. Right now, Borderlands 2 is my drug.

The depressing thing about this admission is that I thought I’d kicked the habit. You see, I’d already experimented with the original Borderlands. After sinking a good chunk of my life into the game, I burned out and dropped it cold turkey. The Borderlands high was no longer enough to distract me from the cold realities of the game, specifically the labor-intensive looting and relentless mission grinding required to keep progressing.

When Borderlands 2 came out, I thought I could play responsibly and quit any time. Big mistake. Bags hang heavy under my eyes, yet I’m still plotting to stay up and play a bit more tonight. Too bad I won’t be able to use "research" as an excuse anymore. Doling out Critical Hits would be a good way to decompress after writing, though. Addicts are good at justifying their behavior.

After my experience with the first Borderlands, you’d think I’d have built up a resistance to the game’s central hooks. Turns out I’m just better at noticing when I succumb to them.  A couple hours into the sequel, I caught myself chasing the dragon again, compulsively looting in the hopes that the next body, the next crate, the next toilet would hold some exotic new weapon or item. Attempts to stay up and play just one more mission inevitably turned into longer quests for enough XP to reach the next level. I can’t help myself.

At this rate, it seems inevitable that I’ll burn out again. Borderlands 2 is, after all, quite faithful to its predecessor. Gearbox might as well have called the game More Borderlands, because that’s exactly what it is. The formula has been refined a little, but the sequel is essentially the same only on a grander scale. In some ways, that’s a very good thing.

I loved Borderlands‘ open world, and Pandora is even bigger this time around. Although the landscapes feel vaguely familiar, there’s definitely more variety in the terrain, particularly early on. That said, the actual environments are relatively spartan. In the years since the first game, I’ve been spoiled Rage‘s richly detailed wastelands.

While Rage strives for realistic graphics, Borderlands 2 sticks to the pseudo-cel-shaded treatment introduced with the franchise. This graphical style’s hard edges have been smoothed out thanks to the addition to FXAA support, and splashes of eye candy have been added through a handful of lighting and other effects. Still, it’s clear you’re looking at a game designed with console constraints in mind. A lot of the textures are blocky and pixelated, a stark contrast to the high-res surfaces on display in some of the latest PC games. No wonder Borderlands 2‘s installed footprint is less than 6GB.

Fortunately, the cartoonish graphical style softens the blow of the relatively low-fidelity assets. The excellent art direction produces great visuals even if the graphics aren’t pixel-perfect. It feels like Gearbox’s artists had more freedom to be creative in Borderlands 2. Maybe they’ve simply grown more comfortable with the stylized graphics. The designs are bolder, and there’s more diversity in everything from the architecture to the characters.

The sheer number of characters is way up in Borderlands 2, whether they’re enemies charging with guns blazing or friendlies trying to convince you to take on another side quest. The varied enemies provide fodder for more interesting combat, and the NPC interactions make the world feel more alive. A lot of those NPC conversations provide additional context for the larger narrative, adding depth—or at least breadth—to the story.

To be honest, the story hasn’t really grabbed me. The dialog is fantastic, though. Borderlands 2 is peppered with genuinely funny one-liners that don’t feel forced or horribly out of place. The offbeat humor is of the more mature variety; if this were a cartoon, it would probably air on Adult Swim.

At its core, Borderlands 2 is a first-person shooter with solid mechanics and old-school sensibilities. The open world affords players a certain degree of freedom in how they approach each enemy encounter, which is a nice change of pace from the linear, heavily scripted sequences that have come to permeate modern campaigns. Rather than being led through the game, players can choose their own adventure—and just the right gun for the situation.

Borderlands 2 has guns. Lots of guns. Too many guns, in fact. Much like the first game, there are countless variations on a handful of base weapons. The behavior of each one is unique, but they’re far more similar than they are different. The worst part is figuring out which guns and other items to carry in your limited inventory. Managing the contents of your painfully small backpack is a constant struggle, since each new level unlocks a new suite of more powerful guns and accessories to pick up. The baddies get upgraded, too, ensuring that those who don’t keep up are quickly outgunned.

While it’s tempting to blame the tedious inventory management on Borderlands 2‘s RPG influences, the other aspects of the game’s alternate personality are much better implemented. Gearbox has managed to add more character customization options without making the process of tweaking your Vault Hunter cumbersome. Having the side quests better integrated with the narrative makes leveling up feel like less of a chore, too. The missions are still formulaic, but at least there’s more motivation behind them.

There are other things I don’t like about the game, of course. Steering vehicles with the mouse still feels fundamentally wrong, and I had to edit one of the config files to tweak a sluggish LOD routine that caused some textures to appear blurry momentarily before sharpening up. Also, I can’t shake the feeling that a lot of the game is set up for co-op play rather than solo questing. Fortunately, my assassin is pretty badass on his own. Indeed, I have the Badass Tokens to prove it.

So far, the Borderlands 2 buzz feels stronger than the high of the original game. Some of the rough edges have been smoothed out, and there’s a certain confidence to the presentation—even a hint of swagger. Gearbox knows full well the potency of what it’s dealing. At least for now, I’m still buying.

Comments closed
    • ol1bit
    • 7 years ago

    Borderlands 2 is just better. The GFX are better (ex:lowing water in the DAM rocks!), the missions are better, it much more varied environments than the original. Much larger!

    Play with 3 of your friends and level up together, not a better coop FPS out there!

    I love it.

    • aim18
    • 7 years ago
    • Bensam123
    • 7 years ago

    Loot whoring games don’t really do it for me anymore. There has to be there then simply looking for the next shiny and I’m not talking how you get the shiny either (such as raiding in WoW).

      • hansmuff
      • 7 years ago

      I really enjoy playing through the plot and shooting things. The story and missions actually all tie in very well, the side quests are decent for the most part. But just like in BL1, the gunplay is just a ton of fun. The loot really isn’t the only motivator for this game.

      Co-Op with different classes is a ton of fun as well.

      Yes, the game is about loot ultimately and I find myself anticipating things I find. But the journey is so much fun that I don’t mind the seemingly mindless loot aspect at all.

    • d34thly
    • 7 years ago

    3 things I dislike about Borderlands ( I love Borderlands) : 1-it’s way too easy, 2-them great damage weapons where “firing increases accuracy” (because it’s fundamentally opposite of gun behavior), 3-the fact that any character (except the sniper/assassin) can pick up a sniper rifle and it’s sights are steady as a rock, yet the sniper/assassin character has to spend skill points just to get it as steady as the other characters naturally have it at default.

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      I only play as an assassin, so I didn’t notice the rock steady sights of any other class, but I love it. It feels more realistic, and patiently setting up a shot on an unsuspecting enemy is exactly what sniping is all about. It’s really great once you get your bullets to pierce multiple targets, I’ve yet to line up more than 2 but that’s easily the most enjoyable part of sniping.

      In terms of difficulty, I’m probably a noob but I’m finding this game is satisfyingly frustrating at times, sometimes in navigation and sometimes in combat. Against willhelm I tried sniping him but eventually ran out of bullets and patience, so I simply stood righ in front of him with a shotgun, and shot him in the face while I used his repair bots to gain second wind (it shoulda been called eighth wind when I finally won)

        • superjawes
        • 7 years ago

        I’ve been distracted by WoW, but trying to solo Flynn as an assassin did hit that frustratingly difficult level. My power is in my rifle and that fight was almost all melee to short range.

        I’m still having fun when I play, but I certainly haven’t hit too many moments when things are too easy.

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 7 years ago

    Funny…I think I’m 3 years behind everyone. I just recently bit the bullet and upgraded to a 2012 system in terms of CPU and GPU. I just spent this weekend going through Bioshock. I’m still not finished but I realized that 9 PM to 5 AM is a little too long to be sitting there at the computer.

    EDIT: Oops. I see I was five years behind.

      • brucethemoose
      • 7 years ago

      Fortunately, games are still 7 years behind today’s hardware. You aren’t behind at all.

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      Fortunately, you’ll always have great games to catch up on for dirt cheap. I sometimes have to wait 6 months for a great game I haven’t played 3 million times to come out.

    • liquidsquid
    • 7 years ago

    Thanks for the warning! I will stay 10 miles from this one.

    • Vrock
    • 7 years ago

    I tried Borderlands 1 this weekend. Bored me to tears. Nice art style, not much else. The first four missions or so exemplify everything that has been wrong with the FPS genre since the late 90s. Go _____, get _____, bring back to ____. I played this game already. It was called Doom II, and it had better atmosphere, better weapons, more challenging enemies, and it was actually FUN.

    I don’t know how Borderlands 2 is, but if it’s like Borderlands 1, then puke.

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 7 years ago

      It gets much better than the first four missions. You have experienced VERY little of what it has to offer.

        • indeego
        • 7 years ago

        Actually I found the first 4 missions pretty representative of the rest of the game. Scale is different, but if you don’t like the first 4, you will not like the rest.

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      You’re doing it wrong. This is not the “FPS” genre ala CS, TF, COD, BF, MoH, etc. This is Diablo 2 with GUNS! DONE RIGHT! With no BS Diablo 3 failings. The atmosphere, story, loot, leveling, graphics, co-op, shooting stuff is all done brilliantly.

        • Vrock
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, sorry. Maybe I just don’t like video games anymore, I dunno.

          • d0g_p00p
          • 7 years ago

          You know I thought the same thing. i have been playing games for as long and i have been using computers. I just realized that as I got older my preference has changed on the types of games I like to play. Long gone are the epic RPG’s and super long games. I am pretty much in the casual gamer market now. Borderlands, Diablo 3 and The Walking Dead are right up my alley. Hell 10 years ago and i would be devouring Dead Souls, Skyrim, Sleeping Dogs, etc.

          As my life has changed so did my games. It’s hard to find what works but when you do it’s amazing and you can still get that feeling that games gave you. Hell I’ll be a gamer until I die. If it’s Borderlands 2056 or what ever I’ll find something that fits with my current life style.

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            Ditto. I don’t have time for MP games, nor do my older friends.

            I can’t play the super violent games with my kids, the other parent doesn’t approve. (Though they’ve really gotten into Minecraft just for the killing aspects. I won’t tell mommy!)

            I want a *fun* game. Single player [mostly mindless] sandbox games are a blast for me, I don’t have to worry about being called newb or playing with certain people at a certain time. I’m there to have fun. Add a plot or humor and I’m a very happy camper.

            I also don’t have patience for incomplete games. I don’t play games newer than 6 months much anymore, because I already troubleshoot crap at work, why would I do it for some game? Let the masses beta-test it for me, and pay the higher prices, as well.

            • TurtlePerson2
            • 7 years ago

            I generally don’t buy newer games either. BL2 was an exception for me because many of my friends were buying at release. If I waited then I would be playing the game by myself at some later point and the value of the game would decrease significantly. I did manage to pick it up for $36, so at least I didn’t pay $50 or $60.

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      I don’t think I’ll like Doom 4 because i just tried Doom 1 + I love going on a forum thread about a game just to state that I don’t like it 🙂

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      I agree that enemies in games these days are not challenging and older games “feel” more fun.. What I have found to counter this is tweaking every new game I get (usually in .cfg or .ini files) I take away, turn off or tweak everything that makes it feel arcadey or consoley and on most games I find a tweak to make them way more difficult ( on skyrim i found a config tweak to scale difficulty to such a degree that it would take 10,000 arrows to kill a chicken, obviously I didn’t play on that extreme, but you see the point). Gaming these days takes some tweaking to be fully enjoyable; It’s well worth the effort everytime.

      • StuffMaster
      • 7 years ago

      I’m with you somewhat. I’ve yet to actually care about what I’m doing in Borderlands 1, it’s just “follow the waypoint” and shoot.

    • sirsoffrito
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve noticed the LOD issue as well. There’s no reason it should be doing this on my GTX 580. After doing a brief Google search, I’ve come up empty though. Anyone have a link or care to explain how to fix this?

    Edit: Derp. Nevermind, if I spend just a minute longer I will answer my own question.

    [url<]http://www.gamefront.com/how-to-improve-borderlands-2-with-ini-file-tweaks/[/url<]

    • symmetrical
    • 7 years ago

    I completely agree. Instead of doing schoolwork, I’ve been finding myself making excuses just to play the game. “Oh just one more level to 22 and I’ll stop.” After I hit level 22, “Oh I’ll just do this one last mission.” And before I know it, 5 hours swooshed by, homework isn’t done, and haven’t changed the 2 year old daughter’s soaking diaper. It’s more eye opening how this really is somewhat like a drug addiction of failing the usual day to day responsibilities. Soon I might have to join some type of Borderlands 2 rehab.

    • voodootronix
    • 7 years ago

    “I can’t shake the feeling that a lot of the game is set up for co-op play rather than solo questing” – it’s definitely more fun with two or more players.

    “Steering vehicles with the mouse still feels fundamentally wrong” – Try playing with a gamepad? It’s not very PC Gaming I know, but it really isn’t CS:S or Unreal – you don’t need twitch reflexes and headshots to progress, you can slump. I like to take it easy when I game!

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 7 years ago

      I find the gamepad to be such a frustrating controller for FPS that I cannot imagine purposely using one when you have the mouse and keyboard as an option. If Borderlands were a console exclusive I would have little to no desire to play it.

      Also, you could probably lie down, put the keyboard on your belly and use whatever surface you want for a laser mouse. You would still have twice the accuracy as using a gamepad.

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      I glad I’ve gone it all solo so far. I think the game would be too easy on coop (i know it scales difficulty with more people but if the way they “scaled difficulty” in true vault hunter mode is any indication, then it’s pretty damn easy in coop. I’m at level 45 in true vault hunter mode and I’ve died once.

    • Meadows
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]Borderlands 2 has guns. Lots of guns.[/quote<] I can hear endless shelves whooshing by.

    • leor
    • 7 years ago

    Couldn’t agree more, it’s very refreshing to see a game company push things forward without unraveling what it was that made them successful to begin with. Glad Gearbox didn’t outsmart themselves by trying to add unnecessary complexity.

    Swagger in the presentation is a good description, my bedtime is not officially pushed back 2 hours every night.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    Lots of gaming hours, I guess it’s safe to say you have no little ones running around, enjoy your free time while you can!!

    I didn’t realize how busy they can be + the wife working. My gaming effectively went from 10-20 hours/week to 0 lol

    • TurtlePerson2
    • 7 years ago

    I have a couple of coop games and a solo game going on right now. My solo game is unfortunately a Gunzerker. The Gunzerker is a ton of fun to play, but he has one huge weakness. He can’t take on shielded enemies. This is a fairly large problem because it makes the difficulty really uneven. I’ll be blowing enemies away, then two shielded enemies take me down.

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      Get a shock dmg weapon?

      If instead you meant the big dudes that carry riot shields then you should run around them? Or use grenades? Or still use the appropriate elemental weapon… shock is quite good with a high occurance % as it still damages them even though they have the shield protecting them from the “bullet” damage.

        • TurtlePerson2
        • 7 years ago

        I did mean the enemies holding shields, not enemies with blue bars. I suppose I will have to try shock weapons. I’ve been using grenades, but you can only keep three in your inventory at a time and there are times when I need ten (arena round 4).

          • FormCode
          • 7 years ago

          corrosive does wonders. keep a distance and shoot the legs. they’ll go down faster than a slag infested midget.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]they'll go down faster than a slag infested midget[/quote<] This phrasing both bothers and intrigues me.

          • yogibbear
          • 7 years ago

          You can upgrade your grenades with eridium… just like guns…

            • TurtlePerson2
            • 7 years ago

            I didn’t have too much luck with electric weapons. It did a bit of damage, but not nearly enough. I’ve upgraded my grenade capacity from 3 to 6 and that helps a little bit. I’ve also found that if I’m patient enough I can get them when they open up the shield.

            • TurtlePerson2
            • 7 years ago

            It turns out that the solution is explosive weapons. Explosive weapons hit like they weren’t carrying a shield.

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      Corrosive Rocket Launcher FTW!

    • sunner
    • 7 years ago

    No ‘Mods’ or ‘Cheat’ codes available for this game?

      • nanoflower
      • 7 years ago

      Looks like there are tables already for CheatEngine. Though you should only use them for a single player game (not sure if they work only for single player or not as I don’t have the game.)

        • sunner
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks for the Reply.
        Do you have a link to that ‘CheatEngine’ you mentioned—-so I can check it out?
        Again, much thanks.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 7 years ago

    I think I should just stop playing games where you have a chance to level up or upgrade something in an experience gaining fashion. I get addicted like an idiot. I just finished Space Pirates and Zombies. 44 hours gone to waste. Hooray!

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      I “had” to get the “War Hero” or whatever achievement meant going to EVERY SINGLE zombie infested system….. took me FOREVER because I picked the biggest map possible. 52 hrs played according to steam stats.

    • yogibbear
    • 7 years ago

    I’m at level 27 playing as Maya, 5000 badass points. Completed 75 sidequests… and just up to Opportunity but haven’t done anything there yet. Spec’ing down cataclysm and loving it. 4 x SMGs in each slot for each damage type, fully upgraded backpack slots and SMG ammo slots and then have some assault rifles, pistols and shotguns just in case I run out of ammo (e.g. for the cage of death [i forget the name] bits where you fight waves of enemies).

    My favourite area of the game so far was probably Caustic Caverns, but Lynchwood was also pretty funny.

    I don’t understand the hate for ammo slots or backpack slots as you should easily upgrade the ones you want very very quickly if you bother to pick up half the eridium that makes it way to you. My only problem is my best shield at this point is white rather than green/blue/purple which is kind of weird… and I haven’t replaced my class mod or relic since level 16. (must’ve snagged something ridiculous). My relic gives me +89% health from 2nd wind. So basically I never die. My shield is one of those awesome high capacity, quick recharge, nova shields. Typically I carry ~7 weapons around and nothing else. So at the moment I always have 18 free slots in my backpack for hoarding and selling.

    • dashbarron
    • 7 years ago

    It looks like Contra meets Paper Mario.

      • rrr
      • 7 years ago

      It’s called cel-shading.

    • oldDummy
    • 7 years ago

    I’m playing it at two locations and get confused where I’m at. Not being that good at it the added complexity is a killer.
    In a couple of weeks going to do it justice.

    • willmore
    • 7 years ago

    I’m about at the point in the game that I feel the need to head over to the wiki and start seeing what all I’m missing. All it take is missing one switch somewhere and you lose out on a whole bunch.

    The recurring ‘turn the power to the shields off to get to the loot stash’ is frustratingly rewarding.

      • Vivaldi
      • 7 years ago

      There’s a difficult one of those in the city of Opportunity.

      I plan to sink my teeth into that tonight, although *everything* in Opportunity is a giant death trap.

      There’s so much action, it’s absurd!

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      Um… Look for the power cable… Follow power cable less than 100m usually… Turn switch. Done. Rinse repeat for EVERY single forcefield / electricity door.

        • TurtlePerson2
        • 7 years ago

        Sometimes you have to shoot the switch. That tripped be up once.

    • Vivaldi
    • 7 years ago

    Great review!

    I blacked out the following, in case some people want to find the lil’ “easter eggs” by themselves. 🙂

    [spoiler<]Tip Moxxxi $1,000 about 10~15 times (in Sanctuary), she'll finally reciprocate with a very nice weapon.[/spoiler<]

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 7 years ago

      [spoiler<]When I first saw the tip jar, I figured she would start stripping or making me drinks. About $2500 later, nothing. Good to know there's actually a reason for it.[/spoiler<]

    • ALiLPinkMonster
    • 7 years ago

    Does anyone else spend an unnecessary amount of time and money on the slot machines? Spending every last penny you have, selling what you get and don’t want, and repeating?

    HAHA, yeah. Me neither…

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I haven’t even played one, yet. I got near one and saw that it was a game, laughed, and turned away to continue on my way.

        • ALiLPinkMonster
        • 7 years ago

        It gives you stuff. Usually either a trivial amount of money or a crappy white gun, but sometimes you can get a decent green or blue out of it or some eridium. Or just a disappointing bomb. I’ve yet to hit the three Borderlands logos, which I can only imagine gives you something awesome.

          • d34thly
          • 7 years ago

          3 borderlands logos gets you a high green weapon, Has anyone gotten 3 Marcus logos yet?? I haven’t.

            • Jason181
            • 7 years ago

            I’ve read that it actually gives you an orange weapon. Haven’t seen one yet though.

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      I just tipped Moxxi a lot of money and [spoiler<]got some nice weapons....[/spoiler<]

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      Me too, love the slot machines. Especially when I roll three bandits and have to run away from it really quick.

      • d34thly
      • 7 years ago

      Have you told your Sponsor that you’re not working an “honest” program at Gamblers Anonymous? 🙂

    • indeego
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]> Managing the contents of your painfully small backpack is a constant struggle,[/quote<] I ultimately gave up on Deux Ex because of this absurdity. There was just too much in the world and I wanted it all.

      • Vivaldi
      • 7 years ago

      Solution: Stockpile Iridium and buy the backpack and bank upgrades from the dealer near Moxxxi.

      Also, I’ve (so far) found two additional places to stash valuable items: 1) Crimson Raider vault (“bank”), fully unlocked can hold about 15~20 items and 2) Claptrap’s locker (holds 4 items).

      For Maya (the Siren) I’ve filled my Crimson Raider vault with only class mods, it’s like a library! Whenever I reset my skill points to try a new class emphasis (mostly been using cataclysm), I just check into the bank and grab what I need.

      Eventually you will settle upon a few choice weapons that you really enjoy using, and you’ll want to just sell the remainder. Fully upgraded, my backpack holds 27 items, but I’d be shocked if I have it half-filled most of the time. What I will do is scoop up random items and run back to a store to sell them all off, for a quick buck. Then it’s off to the slots!

    • south side sammy
    • 7 years ago

    “Attempts to stay up and play just one more mission inevitably turned into longer quests for enough XP to reach the next level”

    can’t save as you go ?……..

    • south side sammy
    • 7 years ago

    so I guess this must be the reason why Fri shortbread cam out late on Sat. and Sat/Sun shortbread came out near midnight Mon. We’re starvin’ here………. setting a fine example………….

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      the shortbread’s are done by ronald. and he loves me, he said so.

        • south side sammy
        • 7 years ago

        not trying to pass the buck are you ?… LOL

        i take it no save on the fly ?

    • GeorgeMichael
    • 7 years ago
    • internetsandman
    • 7 years ago

    I should be studying when I get home at night. Instead I’m playing this game. It’s a massive change from what I’m used to (Strategy games, both real time and turn based). Only other kill and loot game I’ve played was Diablo 3, and while this is an FPS it does the RPG thing way better than Diablo 3 ever did. Weapons and abilities scale in power as your enemies increase in strength, so while you’re sometimes wanting a better rifle or shotgun, your current ones very rarely become completely inadequate

    Graphically I also enjoy it. My only qualms are the render distances. Playing as an assassin, in some of the worlds more open areas, I want to be able to pick off enemies from a great distance, or at least look through my scope and see what’s where. There have been times that enemies haven’t started rendering until I’m running into an area I thought was clear.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      That might not all be view distance. I don’t think enemies spawn in some areas until a player is detected (they chill out inside buildings). Still might not be what you want, but you should still be able to snipe from a distance as soon as you know that you triggered enemies.

    • jacquestrapp
    • 7 years ago

    I don’t like the limited ammo reserves. It seems like I can go into a boss fight totally stocked, then run out of 2 or 3 different kinds of ammo before it’s over. Scavenging for ammo during boss fights gets tedious. I don’t remember this being a problem in Borderlands 1. Also, there really are too many guns, the randomness leads to things like a shotgun that uses 2 rounds per shot but has a 9-round clip. I’m spending way too much time re-stocking ammo and avoiding picking up guns. I mean, is anyone picking up white or green guns after playing for a little while? I’m still playing it, but at this point I’ve stopped doing side quests unless they sound really fun and am just plowing ahead on the main quest, and I’ve done the Gold Key exploit so that if I fall too far behind in the arms race I can hit up the gold chest in Sanctuary and get some new guns.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Not picking up lower level loot after starting out is classic hack-n-slash loot-whore gaming. The last game I played like that was Titan Quest (a great game btw with a unique setting) and I totally picked up every single item to sell until I got enough gold and realized it wasn’t time-efficient to grab every item.

      Having said that, I could have sworn I recall something about Borderlands loot not being that way so much?

      • brucethemoose
      • 7 years ago

      More powerful guns at a given level tend to eat though ammo faster. I remember using a blue Jakobs shotgun that destroyed everything, but used 4 ammo per shot. Auto snipers, big shotguns, and some others tend to eat through alot of ammo.

      Once you upgrade your backpack and ammo storage with eridium, ammo and storage aren’t as much of a problem. But until then, just try to use efficient guns (a powerful Jakobs sniper, for example), switch gun types alot, and buy/pick up ammo and sell the guns you pick up whenever you can.

      • thesmileman
      • 7 years ago

      Then you need a gunzerker! Ammo regeneration!!!

        • internetsandman
        • 7 years ago

        The debate between an incredibly efficient assassin or a replenish-everything gunzerker….

      • yogibbear
      • 7 years ago

      You have been spending your eridium upgrading your backpack and ammo slots? Right? RIGHT?!

      Come on man! I’m playing with 4 SMGs. One for each dmg type.

      • TurtlePerson2
      • 7 years ago

      Buy ammo capacity upgrades or play with a Gunzerker in the party. Also, if you have ammo problems avoid using weapons that consume multiple ammo per shot.

        • mark84
        • 7 years ago

        Or use a shield that absorbs bullets. Helps too.

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]There are other things I don't like about the game, of course... I can't shake the feeling that a lot of the game is set up for co-op play rather than solo questing. [/quote<] This is a bad thing? Co-op gives better loot, at makes looting runs/quests so much more efficient. I never played Borderlands, so the whole concept of a humorous Co-op FPS RPG blew my mind anyway, but I think co-op is one of my favorite aspects of this game. And yes... the loot is addicting.

      • hieu.noob
      • 7 years ago

      Co-op not only gives better loot, but the leveling progression happens much faster, too. I’ve noticed friends who’ve played almost all co-op have reached a point I’m at in half the time and at a higher character level, and better loot as you’ve mentioned.

      Maybe it’s the OCD nature one gets into when they’re by themselves and are exploring ever nook and cranny that takes so long, but co-op definitely adds to the value of this game.

    • RickyTick
    • 7 years ago

    Just when I thought I was ready for a break from gaming, another one comes along and grabs my interest. Dang-it!!

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    I love Borderland’s graphical style. Games that simulate “reality” are interesting too, but I can’t say reality is what I’m seeking. What I’m seeking is a visceral punch in the eyeballs. Whether that comes through realism or impressionism is not very important to me.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      I agree. I appreciate realistic graphics too, but it’s nice to see an artistic use of graphics in games rather just just trying to always make things more realistic.

      It doesn’t hurt that the game has really fun gameplay and really satisfying shooting mechanics either. 🙂

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