My smartphone conundrum

We’re on the outs, my iPhone 4 and I.

Oh, we had a long and beautiful honeymoon. The iPhone 4 was my first proper smartphone ever, and I was immediately in love. The effortless sliding of icons on the home screen, the silky smoothness of the inertial scrolling, and the razor sharpness of fonts at 326 PPI… it was dizzying. I loved the iPhone for its brains, too. Anywhere, anytime, it gave me instant access to everything—maps, e-mail, navigation, music, Twitter, Facebook, news, weather, e-books, you name it. The list went on and on, and the convenience factor was off the charts.

But time started to take its toll on my beloved. The iPhone 4 began to feel more sluggish than before. I started to notice more hitching in the user interface. My usage patterns hadn’t changed—I still mostly checked my e-mail, kept up on my RSS feeds, found my way around in the Maps app, and wasted time on Facebook. However, Apple kept piling on new feature after new feature in successive iOS releases, and each one seemed to make my iPhone 4 feel slower and more dated.

So I started itching for an upgrade. I patiently waited for Apple to introduce the iPhone 5. I mean, what else was I going to get? My girlfriend made the mistake of buying an Android phone a few months after I got my iPhone 4, and I saw first-hand the problems with that device: mediocre industrial design, a low-quality camera, and worst of all, no support for software updates past Android 2.2. My few, short brushes with Android 4.0 on other phones weren’t too encouraging, either. As for Windows phones, as much as I like Metro in a mobile context, I wasn’t thrilled with any of the devices out there—or the integration with Bing.

Alas, my desire for an iPhone 5 instantly vanished as soon as I saw the mess Apple made with iOS 6. Apple’s new Maps app was the biggest and most appalling mistake from that release. It stripped away two major features upon which I relied heavily: public transit directions and Google Street View. And that’s not even the worst part. Some information was just plain missing. Some places were mislabeled. And the satellite imagery was awful, at least for my city. Folks in other places have had no better luck.

To replace the missing public transit functionality, I had to buy a third-party app, TransitTimes+, which set me back $3.99. To its credit, TransitTimes+ offered me a lot of things the Google-powered Maps app didn’t, like individual bus routes and nearby departure times. But it also didn’t do some of what the Google app used to do, and I found it a chore to launch from the neutered Maps app. After spending a fair amount of time with it, I still longed for the old, Google-powered experience.

I thought about toughing it out for a few months until the Google Maps app comes out for iOS. If that turns out to be any good, then I can grab the iPhone 5. But thinking about that option, I realized something.

Left: Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Right: Apple iPhone 5. Sources: Google and Apple.

Google clearly has the better mapping software. I also think there’s no question that Chrome is a better browser than Safari on the iPhone. Chrome handles tabbed browsing more elegantly, and it syncs with my PC, while Safari on iOS can only sync with Safari on OS X (the Windows version isn’t available anymore) and Internet Explorer (which I don’t use). Meanwhile, I use GMail for both personal and work e-mail, and the iOS Mail app still doesn’t have proper support for all of GMail’s features, like push notifications and Priority Inbox.

So, if the Google apps and services are better, then why even bother with iOS? Why not just get a Google phone?

I’ve been keeping an eye on Android, and with version 4.1 (a.k.a. Jelly Bean), the operating system finally seems to have received the polish and responsiveness that prior releases so sorely lacked. Android reminds me a little of Windows in its early days. It feels like Google iterated and iterated until, through sheer brute force, it started outclassing the previously superior solution. Mac OS began looking dated next to Windows in the late 90s, and it feels like iOS is starting to look a little crummy next to Android nowadays. Apple has excellent hardware, but I keep watching demos of Android 4.1 and thinking, why doesn’t my iPhone do that?

Of course, the Android handset market is a veritable minefield of mediocrity—much like the PC clone market in the late 90s. Perhaps the best Android phone out there right now is Samsung’s Galaxy S III, but like most Android smartphones from major manufacturers, it has a custom user interface and custom apps layered on top of the Google OS. Samsung calls those customizations TouchWiz, and I’m not a fan of them. I think TouchWiz icons and UI widgets looks cheap, and what I’ve seen of Samsung’s custom apps hasn’t impressed me. Custom software layers also increase the potential for security vulnerabilities—like the recent TouchWiz exploit that allowed Galaxy phones to be wiped remotely.

What I want, then, is a good, solid phone that runs the stock version of Android 4.1.

My friends tell me I can root the Galaxy S III and install a TouchWiz-free version of Android on it. I considered that option, but you know what? I don’t want to do that. I don’t want to have to jeopardize my warranty, spend hours digging through guides and downloading custom firmware, hoping throughout the whole process that I don’t brick my phone. I don’t want to have to worry about reinstalling the default firmware and resetting flash counters if I need to return the device for warranty service. I want a handset that, out of the box, looks and works just the way I want it to—like my iPhone 4 back in 2010.

That requirement leaves me with pretty much only one option: get a Google Nexus phone. Problem is, the Galaxy Nexus is already about a year old, and its replacement hasn’t arrived yet. There have been leaked pictures of an LG Nexus handset purportedly due out in the near future, and I may well get that one. However, I’m not in love with the industrial design portrayed in the leaked shots, and I have no idea if the camera or the display are any good. I like the feel of the Galaxy Nexus’ curved, textured back, but the LG Nexus’ back will apparently be flat and smooth. Too bad.

My indecision has left me idly wondering if, maybe, I shouldn’t get a Windows Phone 8 device. I’m probably going to upgrade my desktop PC to Windows 8, and I like the idea of running a scaled-down version of it on my phone. Microsoft has said the two operating systems will have a lot of common code, and porting apps between the two should be feasible with very little work. If all goes as planned, I might be able to run downscaled versions of desktop apps on my phone, and vice versa. I expect there would be some amount of synchronization going on, as well, so my settings and preferences would carry over from my PC to my phone.

Unfortunately, I don’t really like the few Windows Phone 8 devices that have been announced so far. The Lumia 920 looks too fat, and as with the HTC 8X, garb choices include “black” and “several garish colors you’re going to get sick of within six months.” Beyond that, I worry about the software. Bing Maps and Internet Explorer 10 may work just fine, but if I’m ditching Apple because its apps aren’t as good as Google’s, then why would I even bother with Microsoft? Plus, even if I stopped worrying and learned to love Bing Maps, I’d still be using an underdog platform with fewer third-party apps than Android or iOS.

That, folks, is my smartphone conundrum for 2012.

I hate being in this situation. Back in 2010, the iPhone 4 was clearly the best phone to get. Sure, there were hiccups with the antenna, but I never experienced those—and I got a free bumper out of the resulting scandal. Today, I’m left scratching my head and wondering what the heck to buy. Maybe that’s a reflection on the smartphone market’s maturity. Maybe it just means there are too many good phones to choose from. But I’m a little more pessimistic; I think it means Apple has gotten too complacent, and because of that, there are no clear winners anymore.

Comments closed
    • Beomagi
    • 7 years ago

    What do you want to use it for?

    I use my phone for media heavily, so MX Player’s ability to playback almost any file without transcodiing (hw or software decoding) is enough to tip the scales for me.

    Apps like samba that let me drag and drop my network shared library of comics, videos, pics etc to and from my phone.

    Having flash is kinda nice too 😛

    I am not too big on phones as cameras. I’m used to larger sensor fast aperture primes on my slr/m43 systems so I wont comment there.

    I’m using an lg motion 4g – my 3.5″ screen is low res crap – but for $150, dual core 1.5GHz S4 kraits can’t be beat. All depends on what you’re looking for.

    • aim18
    • 7 years ago
    • t0ked
    • 7 years ago

    In short, the new RAZR M, HD, HD MAXX might be what you’re looking for. I’ll be gooing to those phones when it’s time for my upgrade.

    • brucect
    • 7 years ago
    • StashTheVampede
    • 7 years ago

    Android, iOS and Windows mobile all seem to have “feature” (sync with Gmail + calendar + contacts) parity for the things I care for. The next phone I’m buying will be the “best” in terms of a camera phone.

      • Voldenuit
      • 7 years ago

      I doubt the Nokia Pureview 808 will be surpassed for some time. Heck, the N8 was unsurpassed for 2 years until the 808 came along. Symbian Belle FP2 has Gmail + calendar + contacts sync.

      If you can’t handle Symbian, the Lumia 920 will probably be the second best camera.

        • StashTheVampede
        • 7 years ago

        Definitely won’t go Symbian and am definitely looking at the Lumia 920. I’m on contract until next year, so I have a little bit of time to wait to see what other phones are released until about August of next year.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Just got myself a Sony Xperia Sola last month. Sony doesn’t get a lot of attention lately in the mobile phone market but they do have some pretty awesome phones.

    • mcnasty72@gmail.com
    • 7 years ago

    You want the Google/Motorola phone. Its should be out around March 2013. Its going to be the iphone killer, it will combine everything you like about the Google powered apps, but with none of the hardware issues when cheap electronic companies make phones, yes I’m talking about Samsung. The new Razer is the beginning of the end for Apple.

    • wizpig64
    • 7 years ago

    I’m stuck on the regional US Cellular (thanks to my parents picking up the bill for now, so no complaints), so my choice is limited to the Galaxy S3. I’d rather have a nexus phone, but at least I can root this one :\

    • chrissodey
    • 7 years ago

    I used to be the Apple hater that I see a lot on these forums, until the iPhone 4 was released on my favorite network, Verizon. At that time I had a Samsung Galaxy S that was horrible. It didn’t receive the 2.2 update until 6 months after every other phone did, crashed during calls, crashed during navigation, and included all of Verizon’s bloatware. I am now also up for an upgrade and have seen/used the wonderful Galaxy S III. It is just too bad the Galaxy S III feels cheap and I have lost total respect for Samsung. What I learned from moving to Apple was the following:
    1. Apps – I usually don’t have to question if an app is available for iOS
    2. Typical phone use works – no crashes
    3. Aftermarket – Accessories galore and everywhere
    4. Photos – The camera might not be the best in terms of specs, but the apps that are available are

    Most everything I was looking for is now available in the iPhone 5 (speed, LTE, battery life, larger screen). For this version I will stick with Apple.

      • TakinYourPoints
      • 7 years ago

      I agree. The iPhone 5 is the best its ever been. It is the fastest smartphone on the market (Anandtech just posted benchmarks) while also being one of the smallest and with the best LTE browsing battery life. I made the move from the 4 to the 5 and it was pretty huge.

      All that plus the best mobile apps means that it is still a legit option IMHO. I see little reason to get anything else unless you need a 5″ display at the expense of those other advantages.

        • NeelyCam
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]I see little reason to get anything else unless you need a 5" display at the expense of those other advantages.[/quote<] Full configurability is a pretty good reason, and the reason why I didn't switch to iPhone 5 even though I was seriously considering it. Everytime I use my iPod Touch I feel like I'm chained to a wall. With Android, I can do pretty much anything

    • clone
    • 7 years ago

    why not buy the HTC one X?

    just wondering?

      • Spunjji
      • 7 years ago

      Probably HTC Sense holding him back there, which would be a shame, as it’s one of the best Android modifications.

        • clone
        • 7 years ago

        figured I’d throw a shout out for it because it reviewed so well, had the features he mentioned and was an underachiever on the sales side forcing it’s price to be competitive (cheaper than the competition)

        I’m also looking at getting it for the wife.

    • Flatland_Spider
    • 7 years ago

    The question is, “Who’s services do you use the most?” Google Services == Android. Self-hosted Services == iPhone. MS Services == Win Phone.

    [quote<]the Galaxy Nexus is already about a year old[/quote<] Don't get blinded by the spec dust Samsung is throwing around. The Galaxy Nexus is a year old, but the hardware is still great for running Android. Android is tailored for that device, and as such, it works really well despite being a mid-level phone hardware wise. [quote<]Maybe it just means there are too many good phones to choose from.[/quote<] There are too many bad and below average phones. There are only two phones that matter: iPhone, Galaxy Nexus, and both of those are mediocre at best. (Mediocre when judged by same standards as someone would judge a normal computer. They score low on the openness scale and re-usability/re-purposability scale. They're both good PDAs; they're just not the "next thing in computing(tm)" people want them to be, yet.) The N9 with MeeGo looked like it was going to be The Phone, but it was killed. BB10 could be something, but I'll have to see what it can do. MS hasn't proven they can compete in this market, and there aren't that many people tied into their services.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Google’s services are generally very well-supported on the iPhone, Maps in iOS6 excepted. And once Google releases a GMaps app, you’re good to go. Google’s calendar, contacts, and mail all sync via Exchange, Youtube works fine, etc. etc. etc.

    • ronch
    • 7 years ago

    Nokia 3310 FTW!

      • Zoomer
      • 7 years ago

      8250!

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      I have one, and it still works!

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    You have finally come across the single biggest hurdle to Android being great; Manufacturer-infected interfaces.

    Give us a phone that runs stock Android and we will buy it. It really is that simple.

      • oldDummy
      • 7 years ago

      Case in point: carrier apps;

      I was in Caribbean and had no phone service [Verizon]. Soo noticing that there was a faint signal I fired up Skype only to find it will only work with a Verizon access point!

      Called up Verizon when I returned, gave them a what for and said I was quitting….was informed that Skype app non-“Verizonized” would work with any isp…. grrrr…now they tell me.

    • oldDummy
    • 7 years ago

    Perhaps it’s just me…not unusual:
    I just downgraded to a non-smartphone from a Droid X. Now don’t get me wrong, I liked the Droid and it ‘s convenience/features but the main thing I got it for was it’s screen. A regular phone did everything I needed but with the small screen I couldn’t see it.
    Due to a confluence of factors (including: my son upgrading to the new iPhone, his “old” gZone Ravine for free, vastly downgrading another son on my plan, viewing the savings from this downgrade) I am able to see the text and messages on a “regular” phone with tremendous savings.
    How much you ask?
    I’m talking about ~150 USD/month savings with the two downgrades. To me this is substantial.
    I still am setting up my “new” phone and am pleasantly surprised with it’s wealth of features. With my usage pattern will give up nothing…at worst.
    Understanding this is a cutting edge tech site and all with the newest and greatest stuff.
    Still….
    Perhaps it’s just me.

    EDIT: I am giving up the ability to use the phone as my computer when utilizing an access point. This was done in Europe and is a great feature.

    • bozzunter
    • 7 years ago

    I am in the same situation of Cyril, with the difference that I also upgraded to iPhone 4S (and I regretted it, apart from the camera).

    Now, I have a question for anyone who is able to answer me: how is the support for HTC and the likes in case the phone is broken?

    Apple is really unbeatable, I had nightmarish experiences with Nokia in Europe, Samsung doesn’t even have a worldwide warranty (and I go back and forth from US to Italy)… I guess the support is the last thing that prevents me from moving to Android from iOS.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      No one else come close in the consumer computing business. Warranties for their main products seem to perform uniformly in all major countries. Apple replaced my wife’s lowly five-year-old 2G Nano with a brand-new 5G unit for free, under exceptional extended support. They e-mailed to let her know that it was being recalled due to battery safety issues, and she didn’t have to pay for shipping or processing. This speaks of excellent support on the level of Intel or Seagate but without the niggling fees.

      Only Microsoft hardware warranties can be as stress-free. If they decide to upgrade Nokia’s support system then perhaps they will rival Apple in this area someday.

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 years ago

        I’ve never had any hardware or software problems in 12 years of using nokia phones. The trick is not to buy the first production run of any nokia phone, which usually has problems, like the N8 with its power-on problem or the Lumia 900 with its data connection problem.

    • Hirokuzu
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]"several garish colors you're going to get sick of within six months."[/quote<] My sister has the pink Nokia N9, and every time she takes it out of her worn out case, I can't stop staring at it. (She had a period where she had it out of her case for more than 6 months... Never got tired of it.) Sometimes I feel it's not the colour itself, but the quality of the paint job (Lumias use coloured polycarb.) Edit: Close Parens and period inside.

    • blastdoor
    • 7 years ago

    I think you should get a windows phone. That would be most interesting to me to read about.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      In terms of what’s good for TechReport, meaning what is good for both Cyril and his readers, this may be the most sensible advice.

      Lumia 920 and WP8 combined is the next big thing, and smartphone buyers need to know Cyril’s considered take of what it has over other smartphones. After that, stories on both the Microsoft’s Surface RT and the fabled new Apple iPad Mini, followed by a piece on the next Google Nexus, and then we’d all be set for the shopping season.

        • blastdoor
        • 7 years ago

        Exactly.

        Even if WP8 is the next big flop, it’s more interesting to read about than stuff everybody already knows about. Most of us know what androids and iPhones are like in real life usage because that’s what most of us own. For WP8, all we know comes from reviews and the local MS propaganda organ (SSK). The problem with most reviews is that reviewers only use a product for a few days — they don’t live with it for months on end.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          hey, i never pretend windows phone is perfect. I just like it more than android, and iOS. Part of that is exactly what your saying: the others got boring. it was a new ui that i found to be more fun.

      • LaChupacabra
      • 7 years ago

      I was in the same spot. My original EVO finally died and work had an extra WP 7.5 phone on my network that I tried out for about a week. I was a big proponent of WP, until I tried it. I think the problem I had was I was used to the customization of Android.

      Windows Phone makes everything into a tile. Even if it doesn’t make sense to do so. It also is horrible to organize. Your tiles are one list that you have to scroll through to find the application you want. You can’t have 1 screen for games, another for things like weather and news, another for widgets like pandora. It’s one giant list.

      My final issue with Windows Phone (that lead me to pick up an EVO 4g LTE, which is a spectacular phone) was again with the tiles. If you are in an area where cell reception is poor and wireless isn’t an option Windows Phone will load the text under a tile in an app before it loads the tile. This means for apps like Pandora you can see the list of radio stations that you would like to listen to, but you must wait until the tile gets pulled through the slow network connection before you can click on it.

      Maybe these issues will be addressed in Windows Phone 8, but I doubt it. There are other confusing things about the OS (can’t change the background, fragmented markets with Xbox, the app store, Music store, all branded Microsoft). The good thing I can say about it is if I hadn’t had experience with Android on my previous device I bet I would like Windows Phone more than Android. But over the last 2 years with my device I have already developed habbits and expectations out of devices that made Windows Phone a bad fit for me.

        • Voldenuit
        • 7 years ago

        This is exactly why I think TR should cover WP8. Lots of geeks are intrigued by WP8, but the reality of using it may not hold up to the promise. I was rather agnostic on the WP7 issue ( had no interest in the system because the many limitations – no true multitasking, no file explorer, no MTP/TT, no bluetooth transfer, no phone with killer camera, limited language development tools and hardware APIs for third party developers – were all giant steps backwards from my then-current symbian phone).

        Trying out a friend’s Lumia 900 WP7.5 phone, I was instantly jarred by the Metro/tile interface. I found it took up a lot of real estate, and like you, did not like the lack of customisability or the humongous list of applications when you ventured off the home screens. Granted, this may be something one could get used to, and I did not spend enough time using the phone to give it a fair accounting. Now that WP8 may address many (but not all) of the shortcomings of WP7, I am curious to see how usable and powerful the phone is, but I don’t want to have to buy a phone ourtight or sign a 2-year contract to see how good the phone is on a daily basis.

        So yes, Cyril, we want you to be our test animal, like a canary in a coalmine. If the coal fumes in the mine overcome you, rest assured we will hold a touching eulogy and bury you in a fancy shoebox ;).

          • blastdoor
          • 7 years ago

          Extraordinarily well said.

          • trackerben
          • 7 years ago

          We shall be impressed.

      • cmrcmk
      • 7 years ago

      I’ve had a WP7 device since January and I’m sick of it. I had a Nexus One before this and I really wish I still had it at this point (or it’s newer Nexus siblings).

      I think WP has a great UI and it is far more responsive than my Nexus One was, despite their hardware being very similar (1Ghz Snapdragon with 512MB RAM). So I feel it has a great foundation. It does have one unforgivable flaw in my view: Microsoft views it as a tool to get you tied to their web of tools and sites such as Bing Maps and Bing Search and Hotmail.

      Also: I. E. 9.

      If they opened things up a little more and treated Gmail like Gmail instead of just another POP3 account and would give me a real Google Maps application instead of Bing Maps (where searches usually put you in the wrong city, if not the wrong continent).

      To be fair, this could be as much Google’s fault as MS’, but until I can use one piece of Microsoft software (WP7) without feeling like I’m looked down on for not embracing the rest of it, I don’t want to be a part of any of it.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        what country are you in?

          • cmrcmk
          • 7 years ago

          USA

    • leor
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve had an iPhone since 2007, and while I completely understand all the reasons people might want an Android or Windows phone, unless Apple totally screws the pooch (and living in NYC the maps app works fine for me, I even appreciate the Yelp reviews) I plan to stick with them for these very simple reasons:

    1) All of my app data has flawlessly moved with me from device to device, I have some apps I bought in 2008 that I still use and have 4 years worth of data.

    2) I know that no matter what (unless I have a 4 year old device) the next version of iOS will be available to me, I don’t have to worry about when company X decides to release an upgrade.

    3) All of my apps will always work, and will always look correct, function properly and be pixel perfect.

    4) Any new apple device will at least be at the top of the bell curve in terms of speed, design, usability, etc. I don’t have to worry about them releasing a piece of garbage.

    5) Anything that Apple does screw up will be fixed, I’m not going to end up stuck.

    As much as I like tinkering with PCs, for some reason I have no patience for messing with gadgets. I just want them to do what they’re supposed to do, and not have to think about it. With the iPhone, I’ve bought into en ecosystem that I can count on to be fairly consistent. There will always be ups and down in tech and the company on top never stays on top forever, but in this case I’m pretty much guaranteed to have at least 85% of the user experience I want year after year, and I have no problem making up that 15% through the odd $3.99 app purchase here and there.

      • designerfx
      • 7 years ago

      “All of my apps will always work”
      uh, maps?

      “All of my app data has flawlessly moved with me from device to device”
      every phone can do that these days.

      “I know that no matter what (unless I have a 4 year old device) the next version of iOS will be available to me, I don’t have to worry about when company X decides to release an upgrade.”
      yeah, ok, – remind me how IOS6 is working on devices that it’s not supported on?

      This is not to say apple is or isn’t right – that’s your own personal choice, but if you think these things are somehow exclusive to apple and apple is explicitly positive you are 100% wrong. Google has it’s flaws too.

        • leor
        • 7 years ago

        “All of my apps will always work”
        uh, maps?

        – yeah, we get it, people don’t like the new maps, I believe I covered that in my post

        yeah, ok, – remind me how IOS6 is working on devices that it’s not supported on?

        – not sure what you mean by this, only very old phones aren’t supported, none of which I will ever own

        This is not to say apple is or isn’t right – that’s your own personal choice, but if you think these things are somehow exclusive to apple and apple is explicitly positive you are 100% wrong. Google has it’s flaws too.

        – I never said any of those things, I just said MY experience has been very pleasantly consistent since 2007. I can’t think of any other platform I’ve ever used where the process of replicating my experience from device to device across 5 devices has been as painless. I’ll finish this post with how I finished the last one since you clearly didn’t read it.

        There will always be ups and down in tech and the company on top never stays on top forever, but in this case I’m pretty much guaranteed to have at least 85% of the user experience I want year after year, and I have no problem making up that 15% through the odd $3.99 app purchase here and there.

          • designerfx
          • 7 years ago

          I’m saying your experience is delusional. These things are not exclusive to apple and they are explicitly not defensible.

          Refusing to sign with google and doing a shitty job on a release of maps is not acceptable. The consumer loses for sake of a ridiculous battle of pride. I read your post, it’s just not accurate. If you want to buy apple, just acknowledge that. But lots of things – and I do mean lots, are simply not working right with apple and never have. It’s time people own up to that, as it’s by design. If you can accept that? Fine, do so.

          If you were a regular consumer who was not a techie would be one thing but we’re talking about techreport man.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Why is his experience delusional in terms of the behavior of Apple devices launched from 2007-2012?

            With very few exceptions, iOS and most third-party apps have always been reliable, secure, and useable on current iOS hardware. Most run passably on previous models going back a year or even two. In comparison, Crypto Blackberry and Security-Enhanced Android are developed to be as impeccably secure and reliable as iOS, if not as polished. But that’s only because these versions have been as tightly baselined and locked-down as USAF/FedCore desktops.

            That said, I really dislike – no make that hate – slow, slow iBooks and the zombie iTunes sign-in dialogue, and I’ve heard of others’ MobileMe and Maps miseries. And I lost some appdata in one iOS migration out of four so far, but no system data loss. But then this is only a handful of significant negatives that I can recall in more than two and a half years of long daily use of multiple iOS devices.

            I have trouble remembering another OS as solid for its day and purposes, mobile or grounded. In the overall mobile market only Nokia’s old S40 may be as impeccable, but only for the “right” model progressions, i.e 6xxx business-class or 3xxx classic series tracks.

            In the grounded computing space it is easier to find highly-evolved console systems superior in design availability to iOS, and not just certain MacOSes. Windows NT3.51 was an uptime rock on ISA boards. OS/2 was even better, operationally equalivent to the best the old Tandem and Digital and *nix and *BSD could muster on vendor hardware – although application upgrades and data migration is another matter.

            But none of these well-groomed machines have to contend with the behavior of hundreds of millions of frolicking heathen users in the great wild. Like primary-school kids or crazy RC hobbyists or extreme sports and military outfits or tour-raging rockstars, and still be expected to deliver a pleasing out-of-the-box consumer experience 24x7x365. For that achievement alone, iOS in general deserves most of the useability and availability praise it gets, and its users know this.

            • Chrispy_
            • 7 years ago

            Well said.

            You can hate on Apple and iOS for being an overpriced, exploitive, walled-garden, restrictive system with dubious ethics, but it is still very very good. Arguably the best system for your average Joe.

            If you want liberty, flexibility and the advantages of the Android ecosystem, you have to sacrifice the polish and solidity of iOS. Some of the fanatics seem to forget that no matter how evil the politics and ethics of Apple may be, their products are still second-to-none.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    Seems like you know what you have to do.

    Wait until Google gets the Maps application onto iOS and consider the newest iPhone when that happens. Until then, you have no reason to upgrade to anything since no single offering is compelling you with its awesomeness.

    I would not buy a Windows phone until I saw that MS isn’t going to up and abandon the platform as they have their last two Windows phone OS’s (6 and 7 were both abandoned when moving to their successors and software made for those versions isn’t well supported moving to the future). Plus, let’s not forget Kin (and to a lesser extent, Zune (and its content) vs the iPod and Zune HD (and its apps) vs the iPod Touch). I would let Windows 8 Phone play out a bit (a year) before I’d ever trust MS’s phones. Plus, I don’t think software will turn out to be much more than things that work better on PC since the majority of Metro apps will be used by PC’s.

    Google will always hamstring anything they make for iOS because 1) Apple doesn’t let developers have a whole lot of freedom in how apps are built and 2) Google wants you to buy into Android (just as you want to).

    Apple will likely improve their Maps application to a point where you’ll be happy with it because they’re taking a LOT of heat over this issue. So I wouldn’t worry about that part, but if you do want to stay in the Google ecosystem (like I do), then you really should be considering an Android phone.

    As for not liking the phones available, well… I don’t know what that’s like. I just buy a phone I need, not a phone I want to have sex with. So I’d just look at the features I need and buy the phone that can do all those acceptably. Don’t much care if it’s the most chic piece of hardware since the spork.

    People today worry too much about form and too little about function, which is why Apple makes all the money they do.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<] "software for those versions isn't well supported?" [/quote<] what? [url<]http://www.neowin.net/news/windows-phone-8-will-run-wp7-apps[/url<]

      • Hirokuzu
      • 7 years ago

      I can understand the annoyance of MS abandoning their platforms, but at the same time I also understand that switching from Windows CE to Windows NT is a huge step forward for MS. They needed to do that to compete into the future. (As a note, from people I talked to from MS, people working on Windows Phone 7 didn’t even know about Windows Phone 8 because there was another group attempting to port the kernel over at the same time)

      Even with them dropping 7.5, they’re supporting it with what they can (7.8). The functionality that CAN be ported over (such as the new homescreen) have, and Nokia is continuing to add functionality to the current Lumia devices. There isn’t much that can be done to add multi-core support to devices that only have one core, for example.

      I know exactly what you mean about buying a phone you need. I’m on and LG Optimus One, looking outside and seeing all the “pretty phones” (IMO SGS3 is ugly) out there and realizing I don’t need most of the functionality. (Flashed CM7.2 to realize that it makes your phone crash occasionally when people call you O.O)

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Your Optimus One is a workhorse. I had one when I first got on T-Mobile in the form of the Optimus T, which is the same hardware with support for T-Mo’s AWS 3G. Small, light, great battery life, just kinda sucky performance. If LG used the same enclosure with updated hardware (like a 1GHz A5 and at least 4-8GB of storage) it’d be insanely popular today.

    • ThorAxe
    • 7 years ago

    Someone stole my Galaxy Nexus at a theme park a few days ago. I had no hesitation replacing it despite the $500 AUD price tag.

      • ThorAxe
      • 7 years ago

      Marked down for replacing my stolen phone…..bizarre.

    • moog
    • 7 years ago

    I switched from a BlackBerry to a dumbphone 5 yrs ago, but recently I was thinking of getting a Lumia (mostly because my company is giving it for free).

    Most people seem to be happy with it

    [url<]http://www.neowin.net/news/nielsen-96-of-users-satisfied-with-their-nokia-lumia-900[/url<] But I still love my dumbphone (data plans are so expensive).

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      i’d get one for sure if it was free. it’ll be supported for a while, and there ARE over 100k apps, and it does support LTE. not sure what’s not to like.

    • Horshu
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve had a WinPhone since release (still have my original Focus), so I’m naturally going with a Win8 phone. For me, the HTC is the one I’m after, as the Beats Audio enhancement is supposed to be pretty nice, and music is what I use mine for the most. On the downside, I don’t like that all the WinPhones (with the exception of the Nokia 820 and the Samsung) are going over to LCD from AMOLED. With the blackness of most WinPhone apps, the AMOLED looks beautiful, and I’m really OK with not having near-retina display.

    • My Johnson
    • 7 years ago

    You can hem and haw over the other phones but the new iPhone, I suspect, likely has the best camera.

      • Voldenuit
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]You can hem and haw over the other phones but the new iPhone, I suspect, likely has the purpliest camera.[/quote<] There. Fixed it for you.

      • aces170
      • 7 years ago

      Nah, Nokia Pureview 808 takes that cake. But then you are stuck with Symbian 🙂

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        the 920 has the 2nd best.

    • Arag0n
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]As for Windows phones, as much as I like Metro in a mobile context, I wasn't thrilled with any of the devices out there[/quote<] luckily, the lumnia 920 will change that in no more than 3 weeks.

    • moog
    • 7 years ago

    Personally don’t see the disadvantage of a “fat” phone. I used to love my BlackBerry in the belt holster.

    I’d rather not cram it in my slick pants – pants wear out quickly when you repeatedly create friction by pulling out your phone, and I need to look sexy for the ladies.

      • internetsandman
      • 7 years ago

      I loved Mophie’s juice pack pro for the iPhone 4, and I so wish there were something similar for the iPhone 5. People always asked me why I got such a bulky case, but in my mind, I’d rather have a thicker phone that can last an entire three day weekend of moderate usage than one that dies out after less than a day of light usage

    • dashbarron
    • 7 years ago

    Lumia 920 looks to be the best.

    I’m in a similar situation; I’m glad you made this blog Cyril. After trying iOS and Android 4.1, I know iOS is too restrictive and draconian to purchase. While Android is nice, the prospects and promises of Windows 8 and Metro is very appealing and potentially much greater, esp. with a Windows home OS.

    Which leaves the choice to be the Lumia 920 or 8x. While 8x looks good the Lumia has very impressive hardware, probably the best out there. This is key…why settle for less than the best when buying a phone to keep for years. It may be a little “fat” but it also sports a beefy battery…and why do I care if it’s a few MM larger? I’d rather have junk in the trunk then a thin sliver of metal I feel will snap in two.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      Am in the same boat with you guys, I’m currently an endless loop on what to replace my 3GS with. Android is an admin sinkhole, as much work as it is play. Blackberry is a question mark but can’t be dismissed yet. iPhone is the choice for all play and all fun, but I also find it constricted. And frankly, an iOS phone isn’t that necessary with a bigger-screened iPad around. That leaves the impressive new Lumias. Hopefully the 920 isn’t too big for my hands, otherwise it may have to be the 820. Worst case the next Nexus, although my experience with the precursor LG LTE wasn’t too good. Choosing the right secondary comms device/satnav will round out a carry kit with a range of differently-sized screens of diverse yet complementary capabilities:

      1) A tightly focused primary voice comms – an S40/Asha classic keypad smartphone,

      2) secondary voice /hotspot /auto media /GPS satnav – <edit> currently a 3GS, hopefully a Lumia x20 or Nexus based on bluetooth features, and

      3) primary browser, which is an iPad for now but am open to a Surface with decent Office

      To be honest I’m getting bored with iOS. I’m not that desperate that I would resort to futzing around with finicky non-Nexus droids or proprietary message phones. For enthusiast grokking and real play I’ve got several PCs, tablets, Kinect and Sony and Nintendo consoles and handhelds, various media boxes. Time spent even on fancy learning remotes and VPN routers adds more to my life and work than monkeying around with smartphones whose consumption UIs are outclassed by tablets anyway.

      • Biosdude
      • 7 years ago

      Really? Win Phone 8?

      I have a Microsoft buddy who’s glowing review of Win Phone 7 was that it was great because there were no apps available.

      And expecting a Nexus phone to be good is a losing idea. I have 2 different Nexus 1 phones and a Nexus S. I am now enjoying an iPhone 5 that actually can reliably sent Google Voice messages, texts, and make phone calls.

      I love the fact that my touch screen really works! I didn’t think that was possible after using my Nexis.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        the store has 100k apps. when apple had 50k it was OMG AMAZING, now 100k is “no apps available”? wtf?

        and wp is the MOST reliable mobile os. more than android or iOS. it just works.
        [url<]http://www.zdnet.com/blog/cell-phones/microsofts-windows-phone-7-is-the-most-stable-mobile-phone-os/6456[/url<]

        • dashbarron
        • 7 years ago

        From what I’ve seen of the Windows 7 platform, and review from people (even die-hard Apple fanbois), is it’s a great product all around–much like the Zune HDs except they have 0 corporate love from M$. All they need are apps and community/corporate support and they can make the platform run.

        • Theolendras
        • 7 years ago

        I’d call it a bad timing. You dropped the Android platform when it was coming to maturity and with industrial design beginning to show up in Android world. Still iPhone 5 is no bad choice by any means, just not the best in my opinion.

      • designerfx
      • 7 years ago

      windows 8 is promises. delivery is nonexistent.

      If you even want to consider windows 8 phones I’d suggest waiting *2 years*from now to see if they’re even worth it.

        • dashbarron
        • 7 years ago

        Well, the delivery hasn’t arrived yet either. With some of their other platforms you could tell the heart wasn’t there and they weren’t really trying. With Windows 8 the marketing winds have shifted, their corporate strategy is realigning, and they’re is definitely oomph behind the move. I faith this will be the start of their mobile Windows platform, if any at all.

          • designerfx
          • 7 years ago

          How do you feel they are somehow trying? All they did is invest a ton into marketing and advertising which, upon previous research of the last 2 years has shown they have done nothing but lose money hand over fist trying to break in.

          They’re trying to break into mobile unsuccessfully.

      • TakinYourPoints
      • 7 years ago

      How is Windows Phone any less “draconian”? It shares the same restrictions that iOS does, except with much slower hardware than the iPhone and far fewer apps. I think WP is a good platform but slamming iOS for those reasons while looking for reasons to praise WP, many of which it actually shares, is bizarre.

    • Shoki
    • 7 years ago

    Once I saw the iPhone5 I bought an unlocked Google Galaxy Nexus from the Play Store for $349. I love this phone. So much better than my old iPhone4 and from everything I have seen as good or better than the iPhone5.

    Maybe the iPhone5 camera is better but I don’t take a lot of pictures anyway.

    What is funny to me is how cool turn by turn navigation and panoramic photos are now that Apple says you can want them.

    Also the lightness of the Galaxy Nexus compared to the iPhone4 or 4s would have been considered “cheap” but now that the iPhone 5 is nice and light… Lighter is cool!

    Bah!

    • Theolendras
    • 7 years ago

    Thing is, you now have many decent choices. If power both on software and hardware is your main concern just wait for the LG Nexus, Quad Krait with Adreno 320 seems to be a heck of a combo, while software configurability, widget, schedule task, google service integration should serve you well.

    If GPS maps and photo quality are of paramount importance the Lumia 920 is the way to go.

    If you like to be taken by the hand and told what you can and cannot do, go Apple way, or invested in iTune. At least you know the unit will be reliable, industrial design, superior graphic power and will get software support for some time. Perfect for the not technically verse people, or the one that value convienience over power most of the time.

    Tough frankly, I think if you can live without iTune, do it. Vendor locking is of no good. At least google apps and Windows app store are kept on their toes as they can be challenged by other app platform.

    • xii
    • 7 years ago

    [url<]http://www.ted.com/talks/barry_schwartz_on_the_paradox_of_choice.html[/url<] My computer dates from 1999 (Pentium III, baby). I've been saving up for a decent laptop for... 13 years. They're all crap, Cyril. For a while the Lenovo Carbon had my hopes up, like so many others before... But there seem to be a lot of quality issues, some screen and trackpad issues. Laptop makers can't get anything right. So the search goes on. Save yourself. (Now, of course I get work laptops. But I usually don't really have a lot of choosing to do there...) Talking about phones, while I'm not a heavy user, I'm actually quite happy with my Meego N9 though. As a long time Linux user, I just sidestepped the whole selection process and got the last Nokia I will ever get. The device actually found me, instead of the other way around. Coincidently, imperfect – or rather immature – as the software is, I like the interface a lot more than Android or iOS. And Nokia maps is quite good; well, I live in Helsinki so it ought to be, but whatever. But yeah, sometimes it'd be nice to find yourself in the middle of the desert, with as only – pressing – goal to find water. Any.

    • geewhiz
    • 7 years ago

    For a phone nearly a year old, the Galaxy Nexus is still an incredible device. Easily the best phone I’ve ever owned. I have an HSPA model which has been running JB since July…I feel bad for people just now getting ICS rolled out to them. I plan to stick with mine till at least spring/early summer and hopefully the new nexus devices have dropped in price by then.

    • juampa_valve_rde
    • 7 years ago

    I’m still using a heavily updated Moto Defy, with ICS courtesy of the Cyanogen people (cheap motorola never released anything newer than froyo), it was tricky to install the first time but now its easy and opens a lot of doors in performance and useability. I was looking for an upgrade and had hopes on the SGS3 Mini (the 4,8″ screen is too much for me, 4″ is my sweet spot), but now that the spec is know, smells cheap, no exynos soc, no quad, only 1 gb of ram, and really the SGS2 with a 4,3 screen seems a better choice even dated as is.

    • Voldenuit
    • 7 years ago

    If GPS is a priority, it’s hard to beat Nokia with their offline Maps and Drive. Very handy for when I swing across the border (I can avoid Rogers’ cut-throat $15/MB roaming data charge) or when I go overseas on a trip.

    Currently, I’m hankering for a Lumia 920 to replace my ageing N8. Having the second best camera on the market (after the Nokia Pureview 808) also doesn’t hurt.

    Course, it’s exclusive to AT&T or Rogers, and it’s one of the heaviest smartphones on the market (at 185g, it’s heavier than a 808!), but the 920 is still looking like the most attractive option for me.

      • Voldenuit
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]If GPS is a priority, it's hard to beat Nokia with their offline Maps and Drive. [/quote<] As a follow on to that last statement, AAS recently [url=http://www.allaboutsymbian.com/features/item/15919_A_real_world_comparison_of_off.php<]tested NavFree[/url<], a free offline-capable GPS app for Android and iOS. It did as well or better than nokia maps on a C7. Might be an interesting option for people who travel.

    • Helmore
    • 7 years ago

    The LG Nexus won’t be the only Google Nexus device around. There are also leaks of a Samsung Galaxy Nexus 2 around the internet and some rumors indicating that HTC will also be coming with a Nexus device.

    If you’re going to be waiting on a future Nexus device than it might not be such a bad idea to also try out a Lumia 920 once you can find one in shops around you. I think it will have the best mapping app you can have on your smartphone. I do agree that the Bing integration is a bit annoying.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Competition on the Nexus line would be awesome. Or better yet a whole line of stuff from high to midrange to budget champion, with prices that aren’t up in the clouds. There’s room for Google to offer a dual-core A9 device clocked around 1.2-1.4Ghz, a quad-core A9 device, a quad Krait or A15 at the top, and maybe a Cortex A5 at the low end. It’d be especially good for Android if Google can raise the bar on what a low-end Android phone is. Pantech tried to do it with the Burst, but the awful software support couldn’t make it pull through.

      Might sound like a pipe dream but I have a nice glass of whiskey and it’s Friday night so let me dream.

    • gnodeb
    • 7 years ago

    I’m tired of reading and listening to this “it’s just works” argument. For a teach site is somehow insulting. My phone is not made by Apple but guess what? It just works.

    Author of this text is willing to pay $1000 for a phone but don’t want to pay $4 for an application. He should not write for teach site.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago
      • TheEmrys
      • 7 years ago

      Teach? Someone needs to help your learnin’.

      • Anonymous Hamster
      • 7 years ago

      First off, I think there’s tremendous value to the “it just works” argument. While I enjoy building PCs component by component, I absolutely hate having software or hardware that doesn’t work right unless you spend a large amount of time futzing around with it. I can futz, and occasionally I don’t mind, but I never look forward to having to do it. I’d rather spend time more productively.

      Second, the point about paying any amount for an app isn’t about the price. It’s about the fact that the original app used to do everything right, but the new version is handicapped. Why should you have to pay anything when somebody breaks something that used to work fine?

        • designerfx
        • 7 years ago

        This doesn’t answer the “how”.

        If it just works is fine. If it just works because it’s functionality is restricted is not fine.

      • aces170
      • 7 years ago

      Agrees, being a tech enthusiast the entire process of freedom that Android gives you should be the reason to opt for it. Rooting and installing a custom firmware is a pretty straight forward process in Samsung phones, thanks to them keeping their bootloaders unlocked.

      I just roll my eyes when Apple fans say that 4″ is enough, apparently when Iphone was launched it was bigger then other phones but back then the argument was big screen, where touch works flawlessly. I do agree that Iphone will give you a better experience out of the box, but you are a tech enthusiast you should be tinkering around with your phone etc 🙂

        • trackerben
        • 7 years ago

        A smartphone may be a major computing platform worth it for many but then so are media boxes and TVs and HD streamers, and we don’t find too many users of those devices clamoring for UI and functional mods. There are in fact full-blown Linux and Android TVs and media boxes on the market and their buyers normally expect no less than a polished OOB user experience not needing much if any modification.

        Why should most buyers of what is basically an FCC -regulated voice and messaging device attached to cellular radio networks, with patched-on computing and digital exchange functionality, desire an OOB experience the same as that of more flexible general-purpose personal computers? Or expect a PC-centric community to be automatically intested in consumer cellphone platforms? Just because many do, and so now it’s fashionable (with incentives) to colonize the personal homebrew and mods computing space with radiotelehony computing memes?

        You’re better off going to the radio and CB sites and make your case there, or perhaps the various in-depth gadget sites. Or better yet, do what most droid players do and go to Google and Android sites.

          • BabelHuber
          • 7 years ago

          As a PC enthusiast, of course I want to have e.g. a firewall on my phone or some powerful file browser with lots of features which is capable of messing around with system files. Just like on my PC.

          I need so much functionality in my phone, like rSAP, W-LAN thethering, USB-Stick replacement etcetc.

          Also I do not tolerate bloated OSes on my phone, just like I don’t tolerate bloatware on my desktop.

          So these requirements leave me with Android.

          Oh, and it is allowed to state an opinion about phones here in a phone-related blog. If you are not interested in smartphones, just read the other articles on this site.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            It might make more sense for busy people to get a simpler classic phone which does not require so much functionality to be useful and so much attack surface to be functional. Segregate non-voice and messaging consumption onto a separate but more capable and bigger screen like an iPad or Nexus 7 or Ultrabook.

            That said, the latest iPhones are less vulnerable to threats and still more polished and app-enabled than Google’s latest Nexus which is good alternate choice pending the release of the new Lumias.

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            The Symbian-Nokias of old had rSAP. Not so the Lumias (in fact the Lumia reminds me more of a dumbphone in comparison to Symbian’s features).

            Also iOS does not support it. My car has a built-in phone, why should I bypass it? I want to use this feature period. With Android, I can at least root the phone and install rSAP on my own.

            With iOS and WP, I could only wonder why this has been left out. No thanks, I prefer flexibilty.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Yea, Symbian is a mature OS and Lumia needs to be evolved a bit more to get to the broad functionality found in the latest iOS and Android.

            I’m curious about rSAP. Most bluetooth hands-free or headset devices either pass voice commands or at most retrieve contacts so that the user can select one and initiate a hands-free BT call on the phone. What advantages are there for using a dedicated radio for hands-free calls instead of the phone’s, aside perhaps from higher power transmission or integration with the car’s control UI?

            • BabelHuber
            • 7 years ago

            You already got it 🙂

            Advantages are:

            – Fully integrated with the car
            – Uses the built-in phone, so you use the car’s antenna to its fulliest. I have better speech quality and no interrupted calls
            – phone is on standby and so almost no battery drain

            Basically as an alternative, I could directly plug a second SIM-card into the car, this also works. But by using the SIM-card of the smartphone I can also use the contacts (no synchronization necessary) and don’t need to fiddle around with two SIM-card for one telefone number.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Thanks for the info, those are real advantages! Am planning to buy a sedan next year and this rSAP feature would be great to have. Hopefully it’s going to be available in the range of 2013 Honda and Toyotas I’ll be looking at.

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      Teach site useful to me. Author opinion okay for teach site feature called “blog”. Some phone contain different teach than others. If you tired of this teach site, different one available.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        i lolirl

        • lilbuddhaman
        • 7 years ago

        Thanks but I’m no find better teach response on other, these persons here best. Favorited mine SSK.

    • glynor
    • 7 years ago

    Two things:

    1. Mapsgate is Antennagate all over again. Is the “issue” real? Sure. Is it really terrible? No, it is fine. Better in some ways, worse in others.

    If you need Transit directions regularly and don’t drive (like Cyril), then it is a net-loss. I don’t think he’s anywhere near the majority of their target audience, though.

    2. On the other hand, I think Cyril really should probably look hard at getting a Nexus phone, but I sure as heck wouldn’t buy one [i<]right now[/i<]. Wait a month or two and give yourself a nice holiday gift. You'll be glad you did.

    • BIF
    • 7 years ago

    I feel your pain Cyril!

    I have an old Droid X and want to upgrade, but just haven’t the time or inclination to make it happen.

    I am not so worried about the taller and narrower screen of an iPhone 5, in fact I think it might work better for me. Nor do the map problems worry me long-term. I believe they’ll get fixed or viable alternatives will be provided in the next couple months.

    What does bother me is the use of aluminum on the back and edge-banding, which is already reportedly getting banged up by users. I want to avoid putting thick armor on my phone, but I think the iPhone 5 is too fragile to leave it unprotected.

    Couple that with my need for better typing and the need for simultaneous voice+data, and now I’m starting to wonder if iP5 is going to be worth it for me.

    What I really need is some time with an actual working iPhone 5 and then some time with two or three actual working comparable Android phones. But for all my current confusion and indecision, chances are the cuter salesgirl will be the one to sway me…

    EDIT:

    Oh come on, two downthumbs? For what, even considering an iPhone 5? Or maybe the mere mention that some salesgirls are cute?

    More downthumbs please. Maybe it will reduce overall stress levels tonight!

    • Ushio01
    • 7 years ago

    Windows phone 8 uses Nokia maps on all phones not Bing maps so there’s another advantage to Wp8.

      • moog
      • 7 years ago

      Yes, the Lumia is worth getting for their free Maps and Music services.

    • ShadowTiger
    • 7 years ago

    I am getting a smartphone for the first time in a few months. I didn’t really need one before but I think my usage will go up now due to lifestyle changes.

    I will definitely install the pure version of android on whatever phone I get, it shouldn’t be too bad.

    The galaxy s3 is a little bit too big of a screen for me to touch the top row of icons with my thumb so I will get an HTC one (which is 1/2 price right now). However, I read that a new version of the HTC one is coming out as well as a cool looking LG phone, I think I will wait a few months.

    • cynan
    • 7 years ago

    Seems like the perfect phone for you is the iPhone 4S… (just make sure you get one that hasn’t been updated to iOS 6)

    • flip-mode
    • 7 years ago

    So because Apple threw a hail mary and tried to do their own maps you’re saying… Apple got complacent? That doesn’t make sense to me.

    Sooner or later, an extremely specific product like the iPhone will reach as near to physical perfection as possible – not too big, not too small, not too flat, not too rounded, enough pixels, but not adding more after that, and so on. So, physically, there’s not much left to do, I think.

    Software wise – how is Apple Maps complacency? It’s kind of a major undertaking. There are two problems with Apple Maps. First, Apple now hates, hates, hates, Google so strongly that they decided there shall be NO Google apps on future iPhones. Secondly, they released Apple Maps too soon, probably also stemming from the fact that they hate Google soooo much that they couldn’t even wait till Apple Maps was done to give Google Maps the boot.

    As for Safari, I’m sure you have a point there, but when all your programmers are working on maps, Safari is going to wait.

    On the other hand, Google has been steadily and incrementally improving Android. Each new release is not a total makeover – and they NEVER should be if the product is already fundamentally sound. The problem with Android phone market is that there are 100 or 200 Android phones to choose from. No, no, no. That’s bad. That’s called forced differentiation. All these devices have small differences just so they can be different and for no other reason. But, think about it – all these devices are for the exact same end use. That means that for the sake of differentiation, Samsung (just to pick one) designs one more, and then one more, and then one more different phone. No. You’re doing it wrong. Therer should be only one, and you should have made sure that every decision was made and every feature was designed such that the end product is THE BEST.

    Luckily, the Google reference phone is generally just that, or at least pretty close to it – designed to be the best it can be. And it gets the software updates.

    I have no issues with my Nexus S other than that it is not 4G. And I don’t know what it is about being on Cincinnati Bell but I always get the next version of Android before anyone. I had Jelly Bean on my phone before anyone could buy a Jelly Bean phone. It’s weird.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Your Nexus S is the same i9020T that T-Mobile users get, most likely, and so yeah you got the Jelly Bean update within days of its announcement. The only phone that got it faster is the Galaxy Nexus and it was less than a week difference. When you don’t do carrier branding and it’s the international version of a phone, they can circumvent the carriers with software updates.

      The difference is when you start dealing with a CDMA carrier, because Google can’t/doesn’t sell unlocked CDMA devices. Verizon especially was notoriously bad about holding up the Galaxy Nexus LTE’s Jelly Bean update. It was like 2 months later than everyone else’s.

      (also, spot on about Apple. They’ve taken one chance too many and they’re paying for it right now)

    • Sam125
    • 7 years ago

    I’m going to suggest some alternatives to Android and iOS:

    How about picking up a Nokia N9? The first and last commercially available phone to sport MeeGo before they went WP?

    Or if you can hold out a bit, how about waiting for BB10 in touchscreen or keypad form which are both slated to be released the beginning of next year?

    I think Bada and the Tizen Project are worth looking into if only for the information as I doubt you’ll find something sporting anything from those two initiatives in the US for a while.

    • tay
    • 7 years ago

    In my view the iphone5 is better in every way other than screen dimensions and maps. Get what you like though.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    Get one of these and call it a day. 🙂

    [url<]http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p8/knyte6426/dynatac.jpg[/url<]

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      i’d love my own old man!

        • anotherengineer
        • 7 years ago

        I do believe that is his left hand, with no ring, you could be in luck, that is if he is still alive today 😉

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I think I have some batteries for that around here somewhere….

      • David
      • 7 years ago

      “Heavy is good. Heavy is reliable.”

        • ModernPrimitive
        • 7 years ago

        “I’ll take it… sooo, how much do you want for it Boris?”

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    A shame that LG is making the next Google-branded phone. From DVD-RW drives to BluRay players, I’ve never had good luck with a single piece of LG electronics. If they’re not going to go with Samsung again, they should go back to HTC. Or Motorola – if they bought Moto Mobility, why don’t they have them make a dang phone?

    • setbit
    • 7 years ago

    I hear ya, Cyril.

    It sounds as if you want exactly the same thing I do: the smartphone equivalent of a Google Nexus 7 tablet.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      How is that not a Galaxy Nexus?

    • windwalker
    • 7 years ago

    You can’t have everything, Cyril.

    If you (want to) use a sophisticated operating system with lots of user visible features, go for Android.
    If you (want to) use excellent applications, go for iPhone.

    To a PC hardware enthusiast like yourself and your readers, the proverbial grass will always seem greener on the Android side, but you will ultimately be left disappointed and annoyed if you aren’t willing to tinker.

    You can buy a Galaxy Nexus now that it’s cheap and convince yourself of this or you can go to a store, touch an iPhone 5, laugh at your so called conundrum and buy it on the spot.

    • yval
    • 7 years ago

    With the time used to write this little rant, you could have easily rooted your phone, downloaded, and flashed a custom ROM. Websites like XDA developers have all the information you could need in order to get pretty much any of the newer Android phones up to speed. I have a Samsung GS II LTE already running Android 4.1.2 (which just came out earlier this week) thanks to ParanoidAndoird/CyanogenMod. It takes me only a few minutes to download the new update, flash and get up and running. Same with my ASUS Transformer Prime (also running on 4.1.2). No, carrier bloatware, no manufacturer crapware, and some added functions thanks to the custom ROMs. Now, the problem about the industrial design, that’s a whole other issue. I think HTC makes the best phones design wise, but none, other than perhaps Nokia, can make good phones, hardware wise, like Apple at the moment.

      • grantmeaname
      • 7 years ago

      He’s a journalist. Sharing his opinion of the industry he currently works in is his JOB, not a rant.

        • yval
        • 7 years ago

        Disagree, as a journalist you can give an opinion without necessarily denigrating something you don’t like or disagree with. His tone in this piece is far more of a rant than a journalistic piece.

          • grantmeaname
          • 7 years ago

          I didn’t see any ranting tone anywhere. It was a tech-literate, even, fair comparison of all the smartphone sides compared with broader musings about what it all means. I don’t know how you can find that even remotely objectionable.

            • yval
            • 7 years ago

            “the Android handset market is a veritable minefield of mediocrity”… really? Perhaps you don’t understand what tone is then… I also don’t find it objectionable, so don’t put words in my mouth, I just feel that his piece was more of a rant than journalism.

            • Shambles
            • 7 years ago

            You’re trying to make a mountain out of a molehill. Don’t confuse tone with style. I get the feeling that you don’t actually care about looking at what the tone of the article is. It’s fairly obvious the article is about wanting a phone ‘that just works’. Writing an 11 line paragraph detailing how he could have rooted his phone only further proves his point.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            There are so many Android handsets that do very little to separate themselves from the crowd. For nice high-end handsets it’s about 5-6 models depending on carrier:

            HTC One X or One S (depending on carrier)
            Samsung Galaxy Note
            Samsung Galaxy S III
            Galaxy Nexus
            Motorola Atrix HD
            LG Optimus 4X (which I think will be the basis of the new LG Nexus)

            And then a whole bunch of stuff that isn’t all that different. Some Exynos dual-core phones, some Qualcomm Snapdragon S3 phones, a Tegra 2 phone here and there. If they’re not in the list above, they’re all basically the same black slab with some capacitive buttons, a bit of storage, middling battery life, and Gingerbread or occasionally ICS. Some have 2011’s LTE chipsets complete with battery suckage. Some don’t have 4G at all. The low end is starting to creep up out of the ARM v6 days, being replaced with Cortex A5’s like MSM7227A. But for all the variety in Android, there’s not much worth paying attention to outside of the list above.

            • grantmeaname
            • 7 years ago

            There are lots of excellent phones and lots of mediocre phones in the market. The fact that Cyril is blessed with a wide vocabulary and a flair for metaphor doesn’t make him a raving lunatic. If that’s the most unreasonable sentence you could pull from the op-ed, it’s no rant.

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            I’m not saying this is or ins’t a rant. But the tone is certainly a lot more edgy than the polite-sounding, well-thought-out editorials we normally get from Cyril.

            I mean he is pretty hard-sounding on Android. Everyone knows that Android really didn’t hit its stride until ICS (4.0), so why is he comparing Android 2.X phones to an iPhone 4 in a blog piece about the lack of phone options at the end of 2012?

            Besides, I’m not sure what the overall message is. There are at least a handful of pretty good phone options. For Android, you have phones like the Galaxy S3 and HTC One X if you can afford them or the Galaxy Nexus for something a bit cheaper. For Windows Phone, you have The New Nokias, HTC (8x – looks nice so far) and LG (L9) and upcoming Microsoft phones. And how does Cyril know that MS apps will offer a sub par experience (or was this a comment about the lack of App selection on Windows Phone?)

            But no, no phone is perfect. Not even the iPhone 4 when it came out (but you’d never know it from this piece).

            I can certainly see how this can come across as little more than a rant by someone who’s illusions of Apple mobile device perfection were shattered upon the release of iPhone 5 and the mapping software debacle.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            This isn’t a review; it’s a blog post. It’s his opinion, rather than objective analysis with hard benchmark numbers. At the same time, it’s a well thought-out opinion about the state of the Android market.

            • cynan
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]This isn't a review; it's a blog post. It's his opinion[/quote<] Sure, and I enjoyed the read and even appreciated the added inflection/emotion that you don't normally find in a review piece. That doesn't mean that it doesn't come off a little rantish - not necessarily a bad thing for a blog. I just don't really see what the whole conundrum is. I think there are a few decent phone options that are either available now, or will be over the next couple of months. [quote<]At the same time, it's a well thought-out opinion about the state of the Android market[/quote<] Other than the fact that Carriers and hardware OEMs continue to laden their handsets with mostly useless skins and bloatware, I really don't see how. This isn't necessarily just an Android thing either. It just doesn't happen with iPhones.

      • TheEmrys
      • 7 years ago

      You do understand the difference between a blog and an article, right? Its a blog on a tech site. Its perfectly appropriate. The problem is yours. Change your expectations.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      In the time it took you to write this…okay, it might take longer to get through the post…

      But still, Cyril addresses the issue of rooting an Android phone in this paragraph:

      [quote<]My friends tell me I can root the Galaxy S III and install a TouchWiz-free version of Android on it. I considered that option, but you know what? I don't want to do that. I don't want to have to jeopardize my warranty, spend hours digging through guides and downloading custom firmware, hoping throughout the whole process that I don't brick my phone. I don't want to have to worry about reinstalling the default firmware and resetting flash counters if I need to return the device for warranty service. I want a handset that, out of the box, looks and works just the way I want it to—like my iPhone 4 back in 2010.[/quote<] So it doesn't matter how long it would take. Rooting his phone is not somethig he wants to do. The entire post revolves around this theme that every platform has issues compared to his original experience with iPhone 4 at launch (pre iOS 6 maps, etc.).

    • invizen
    • 7 years ago

    I have both the iPhone 5 and Galaxy Nexus. iPhone for work and Nexus is for personal, if i had to choose I would choose the Nexus everytime, hands down. Also with the Nexus being fairly dated i’m sure you can pick one up for a great deal.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, like $350 straight from Google.

    • Dazrin
    • 7 years ago

    I am strongly considering the HTC One X+ (or even the One X), the hardware is top notch and the HTC flavor of Android (Sense) is considered one of the best, even if it isn’t the plain Android experience. Coming from an iPhone, the lack of microSD and replaceable battery probably won’t be as big of a deal vs coming from a phone with them and is the biggest drawback that I have heard about.

    • obarthelemy
    • 7 years ago

    Congrats for starting to see the light ^^

    “Your friends” could also have told you that on Android you can switch launchers (the graphic shell that displays homescreens) without rooting your phone. there’s a bevy of alternative ones, from even more flashy to very barebones. Also, Samsung’s stuff can be disposed off, to get back to a more sober home screen, with no tinkering apart from deleting widgets, and you can get seperate Apps and Widgets to your taste. I’m made my GNote light-on–dark, showing RSS, calendar and new mails on the first homescreen. Very legible in any light condition (from bright sunlight to at night in bed), and kinda classy in a very sober way.

    That doesn’t solve the update issues though, but my guess would be the GS3 will be good for at least 2, 6 months late. I find I don’t really care that much about updates though, my Xoom 1 went from 3.x to 4.0 to 4.1 and I’m still doing the same things, the same way, at the same speed, with it. Ditto for my GNote, I’m really not noticing anything new with 4.0. I know I should be antsy to get 4.1 but.. .I’m not ?

    Ever since I got had by MS, when I bought both their latest desktop OS and their latest smartphone OS, only to find the two couldn’t talk/sync (7 and winphone 6.5 IIRC), I don’t trust them to care of nor even think of their users when a new fad rumbles thourgh MS’s headquarters. Plus honestly, I don’t see what Winphone could do that Android doesn’t, and I find WP7’s interface clunky as hell (no hint when/which way you have to scroll stuff, and that changes from topwards to bottomwards to sideways randomly).

    And finally, I disagree with the iPhone being the best smartphone in 2K. I could never use such a teeny tiny screen. But then, I’m 40. To me, smartphones are : a screen. They can be slow, even a bit buggy (like my CM7 HD2 was at the time), but they can’t have a small or bad screen. Samsung’s huge AMOLEDs are head and shoulders above the rest, both for being BIG and for being AMOLED. No glow-in-the-dark stamp-size screen for me, thank you.

      • Pettytheft
      • 7 years ago

      I put a different launcher and changed the widgets and it looks nothing like the stock S3. I have my apps, icons and screens set up exactly how I want them without rooting my phone. Wouldn’t go back to iOS for anything. I don’t know how this rumor got around that your phone must be rooted to change the look and feel of it.

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<] Maybe that's a reflection on the smartphone market's maturity. [/quote<] Nah, I think the phone designers are just incompetent. I'm in almost the exact same situation. I still love my trusty iPhone 4, but it's starting to feel really slow. The iPhone 5 has the right hardware for a proper upgrade, but I'm not a fan of the lengthened form factor. A jailbreak is pretty far off in the distance, and can't live without Google maps and my Cydia tweaks. What I want is an Apple A6/Cortex A15 running some OS with tight google maps integration inside my iPhone 4. Sadly, that's not gonna happen. The Lumina 920 seems nice, but Windows phone... meh. I don't know much about it, but the OS seems pretty locked down, and I'm not a fan of Bing/IE. The Samsung Galaxy SIII/HTC One X don't really turn me on either, and Snapdragon is good, but the graphics aren't up to par yet. LG may fix that with their rumored phone, but I'm never buying an LG phone again after my experience with the last one I had. The Nexus was perfect... a year ago. So what's my course of action? Clean out my iPhone 4, then hold off. TI's OMAP 5 is gonna be a beast of smartphone SOC once it's out next year. If someone releases a solid phone with that chip (A Nexus, perhaps? Google's already used OMAP 4), that'll be my new phone. Otherwise, I may jump on a Xiaomi Mi2.

      • FubbHead
      • 7 years ago

      The irony when someone that loves their iPhone laments Windows Phone for being too locked down. 😉

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        True, +1.

    • shaurz
    • 7 years ago

    iPhones lacks basic functionality like being able to bluetooth pictures to/from a PC or another phone. I was trying to transfer photos from my mum’s old Android phone and her new iPhone 5. After some research I found that bluetooth was not an option, so I sent them to a PC and installed iCloud. It uploaded half the photos and then just stopped. I tried everything, reinstalling iCloud, checking every setting but it simply refused to upload the other photos. So I’ve given up for now…

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      USB into PC and access the files directly? Granted, I’m doing this on an iPhone 4, but I am running iOS 6.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I recently tried to send my contacts from one of my phones to an iPhone running 5.1.1 and discovered that they didn’t support that. Really? Sheesh, you can’t do anything without iTunes on those devices.

    • bhtooefr
    • 7 years ago

    The problem I can see with WP8 is, it seems like the only people getting it are getting it because it’s not iOS or Android.

    Of course, the rule with Android is, only the latest Nexus device. (I hate that, because it means no physical keyboards unless I get one that clips on. End result? I got in on the iControlPad2 Kickstarter, because I can attach it to any Android phone that I get.)

    • sweatshopking
    • 7 years ago

    nokia drive is a well reviewed mapping tool, and the new nokia maps are pretty solid. you do have less app choice, and if the ugly colors are an issue, the samsung ativ is a silver phone that looks decent.

    • esterhasz
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve had a GNX since it came out and am still impressed by Android 4.x. Widgets are extremely practical for my use. And Chrome is great.

    The phone itself is also great – it actually fell into the full bathtub while bathing my son, fished it out, still works…

    • Samlind
    • 7 years ago

    I got a Galaxy S II a year ago, rooted it, disabled the Samsung crap, and lived happily ever after. A root is a 5 minute job anymore, and is reversible, and as long as you don’t delete the crapware, you can always put it back.

    What you have with Android is a voice system that works, and phenomenal integration with Google products. Google Voice is my voicemail, and the convenience of getting an email containing a rendered transcript and the actual MP3 of the voicemail attached in my inbox is huge.

      • FubbHead
      • 7 years ago

      Same here.

    • steelcity_ballin
    • 7 years ago

    I would urge you to revisit android. 2.2 was Froyo IIRC and that was a long, long time ago. Most are on at least gingerbread, with a fair bit on 4.0.4 ICS which was a major leap forward. Now they are finally addressing UI priority it seems with 4.1 Jelly Bean so I’ll be excited to get that when it comes my way. My phone is a year old now (Rezound, heavily modded) but it still holds it’s own in any task I think a phone should.

    The biggest thing working for, and against Android is the segmentation. It leaves some owners in love, and others ready to switch. The new LG Nexus device is rumored to land at the end of this month.

    If you’re looking for a reasonable stopgap the GNex is still a sweet sweet phone, and the SIII is selling like crazy too.

    I’m with you on the Windows phone though – I think it’ll flop no matter what.

      • Tamale
      • 7 years ago

      This this this. Cyril, I’m afraid you’ve fallen into the same trap I nearly did after I got my HTC Sensation nearly a year ago – the guides I found when I first googled “how to root htc sensation” were so overwhelming I thought I’d have to spend a whole day just to figure it all out.

      But.. I started reading anyway.. and eventually, I found a link that had a simple 5 step guide to installing Clockwork Recovery Mod (commonly referred to as CWM).

      Once I had CWM on my Sensation, all was gravy. This is truly the point where an android-capable phone becomes a ‘smart’ phone, IMHO. Downloading and installing new ROMs, backing up entire system images, and managing boot loaders / SD cards becomes so simple you’d think Apple would’ve come up with it. I was completely blown away at how EASY it really is once you understand a few basic things.. and now that I’ve been running jellybean cyanogemod nightly builds for a few months I can honestly say I love my phone now more than I ever have – and trying to use anyone else’s iphone, windows phone, or stock android phone feels horrible in comparison in terms of responsiveness, app support, configurability, and quite surprisingly, battery life.

      Since the sensation is quite old now (but still a fantastic balance of size and speed, IMO), get yourself the new HTC One X or the Galaxy S III and look up how to install CWM first and foremost. Don’t stop until you find a SIMPLE guide or youtube video and just follow the steps to a T. The risk of bricking / warranty issues is way overblown, and like I said before it really is a lot easier than it seems at first. Once you get that mod on there, you can backup your stock image (including ALL your customizations), then try ANY rom you wish with zero risk / difficulty.

      What’d be really awesome is if after doing this you can write a follow-up article about it, TR-style 🙂

    • ludi
    • 7 years ago

    Per [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=83882<]this recent TR thread[/url<], I now have an unlocked Galaxy Nexus on the way. The "but it's a year old" complaint doesn't sway me. The original Nexus One was so good for its time, it can [i<]still[/i<] be bought for about $200 on Amazon, almost four years later. Spec-wise, the Galaxy Nexus should have a similarly long shelf life (other than the lack of a micro-SD slot, which is a bit of a downer). Plus, if you have the unlocked phone, you won't have any trouble flipping it later if it doesn't work out as a long-term solution. Somebody is still going to want it.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      Why a Nexus One is $200 is beyond me. The Nexus S can be had for the same price and beats the pants off a Nexus One in just about every way.

        • ludi
        • 7 years ago

        New, the unlocked Nexus S runs more like $300. And the Nexus One is still better than a lot of the newer, cheap smartphones floating around.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          Ah, yeah, I guess so. I was looking at eBay because I assumed there were no brand new devices. THere are new-condition ones on Fastlanewireless.com (which I’ve bought from before) for $289, which seems a bit high.

          Then again “excellent” condition i9020Ts are $156. That’s a steal.

          • siberx
          • 7 years ago

          I’m still using mine, and I’m most definitely the kind of person who likes to have a high-end phone on me. Still waiting for manufacturers to start making reasonably sized high-end units again; 4″ or less. Apparently they *don’t* want my money?

          I had some hope for the SGS3 Mini, but it turned out to be nothing more than a cheap marketing trick by Samsung trying to pawn a last-gen phone off as high-end on brand alone. It’s pretty sad that it’s got *lower* pixel density than my N1 – a phone that’s now close to 3 years old.

          I understand that tastes differ, so I’ve got nothing against these larger units in general; you’d just think with how wide the Android ecosystem is some manufacturers would possibly consider, I dunno, differentiating a bit?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            Seems like there’s an untapped market for dual-core phones with relatively small but high-DPI screens. Everyone is going 4.3-4.5″ (or more) on high-end devices.

    • kumori
    • 7 years ago

    I’m in a similar same situation. I have an iPhone 4S and the fact that iOS maps and mail are not nearly as good as the Android alternative has me leaning towards an android phone (Galaxy Nexus for the same reasons). Nevertheless, I’ve found Safari to be a better browser. It normally has less problems loading overlays of websites like pop up log-in boxes or annoying adds. I had the OG Droid (up to Gingerbread) and had lots of problems with loading sites that I’ve never had on the iPhone.

      • cynan
      • 7 years ago

      Chrome is actually pretty good on Android (which strangely enough, has only been available for a few months)

    • codedivine
    • 7 years ago

    Cyril’s first world problems 🙂

    • derFunkenstein
    • 7 years ago

    Android 3.0 (Honeycomb) wasn’t on any phones. Did you mean 2.3?

      • Dposcorp
      • 7 years ago

      He probably couldn’t see the version number properly through the tears in his eyes, which occurred when the Apple RDF wore off. 🙂

      In seriousness, I am thinking of getting a used Google Nexus phone myself, since I have seen a few people with them, running Jelly Bean, and they are singing its praises. Playing with it, I really like how looks and works.
      Pay the cash to buy a used one, use it for a while and then decide if want something newer. You can always resell it and make a lot of your money back, depending on how long you hold on to it.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        The Galaxy Nexus looks like a really nice phone. I thought long and hard about it when I went with the One S, because I like Jelly Bean on my Nexus 7, but went with the One S because it wasn’t that much more for a faster CPU, 32GB of storage, and HTC’s special camera sauce. My phone is changing my mind about cell phone cameras.

          • cynan
          • 7 years ago

          But then the One S has much lower PPI than the Galaxy Nexus. This is a pretty big trade off. I’d take the higher resolution screen over a better camera on a phone.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 7 years ago

            I’m sure it’s a stunning display and all at 1280×720. The pixels per square inch is very similar (if not higher) than an iPhone. On the other hand, though, I knew going into my purchase that the One S has roughly 15-20% more pixels per square inch than the G2x I was replacing (because it croaked), and I knew that the G2x had a high enough density that with my bad eyes it was plenty good enough to read. And I wasn’t disappointed; the One S is sharper than the G2x to the point that my less-than-perfect vision can’t see pixels at my normal viewing distance. If I had better eyes I’m sure I’d want a higher density.

            OTOH, the One S is the first phone where I like the pictures better than my aging P&S Nikon. When I’m out with the family or with friends, I always have a decent camera with me now. The fact it can take video and stills at the same time is mind boggling.

      • Cyril
      • 7 years ago

      Oops, I meant [s<]3.1[/s<] 4.0. Forgot about the weird tablet/phone version number jump. 😉

        • derFunkenstein
        • 7 years ago

        Also not on any phones, was it? I didn’t think there was anything between 2.3.x and 4.0.x. Honeycomb was tablet-only and not open source, yes?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 7 years ago

          OK now we’re good! lol

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