On the marginalization of consumer laptops

You probably saw that Gartner report earlier this week about the sluggishness of PC shipments last quarter. Shipments were so sluggish, according to Gartner, that they shrank by almost 5% compared to the same quarter in 2011. I’m sure there were many factors at play, but Gartner pins the blame on one in particular: users relinquishing PCs for daily use.

Whereas as once we imagined a world in which individual users would have both a PC and a tablet as personal devices, we increasingly suspect that most individuals will shift consumption activity to a personal tablet, and perform creative and administrative tasks on a shared PC. There will be some individuals who retain both, but we believe they will be exception and not the norm. Therefore, we hypothesize that buyers will not replace secondary PCs in the household, instead allowing them to age out and shifting consumption to a tablet.

I’m a PC enthusiast, and chances are you, the reader, are as well. We might therefore find it hard to imagine folks ditching their computers for comparatively limited tablets. I mean, you can’t do much on a tablet, can you? Most of them lack Flash support, make multitasking awkward at best, and don’t play terribly well with keyboards. I use mine for e-book reading and some light gaming, but I would never dream of taking it to a trade show instead of a laptop. No way.

Yet Gartner’s suspicion is truer than you might think—and as it happens, I have some very convincing anecdotal evidence to support it.

I bought my girlfriend an iPad 4 for Christmas. Well, technically, we went to the Apple Store and picked it out together. Aline chose the base Wi-Fi model (in white) and a matching SmartCover (in pink) for a total of $538 U.S. before tax. She unwrapped everything a couple of days early (because waiting sucks), played with it some, and then promptly stashed away her notebook PC—a relatively speedy 13″ machine with a Trinity APU and Windows 8.

The laptop has been sitting under her desk ever since. She hasn’t switched it on in almost a month. Not once.

And really, the substitution makes perfect sense, if you think about it from her perspective. The iPad has a great many advantages over a cheap consumer laptop:

  • It’s fast. Aline’s laptop wasn’t slow by any means, but many consumer notebooks are. The iPad isn’t. The iPad’s user interface feels snappy and responsive. Apps load quickly, and you rarely get the sense that you’re waiting on the device. Part of the credit goes to Apple’s excellent A6X processor, but a big part goes to iOS, which is expertly tailored to run smoothly on the low-power hardware. The same can be said for a lot of third-party iOS apps. Using a brand-new iPad is just a very satisfying experience all around.
  • It’s cool and quiet. The iPad has no fans to whine and moan at you when you’re running games or watching online videos. It never gets uncomfortably hot to the touch. It never scalds your thighs. Getting those same perks from a cheap PC laptop is difficult if not impossible. During Netflix marathons, Aline usually had to prop her Trinity laptop atop an Amazon box to keep her thighs cool. She did the same with her old Intel CULV ultraportable before that. The iPad can be cradled comfortably in her arms no matter what it’s running.
  • It’s supremely portable. At 1.44 lbs, the iPad is lighter than virtually any notebook south of $1,000. And since it’s just one big, super-thin screen with some hardware glued to the back, you can use it comfortably anywhere—on the couch, in bed, on an airplane, and even in the john. (Or so I hear. Ahem.)
  • It actually has all-day battery life. Notebook vendors have promised us all-day battery life for years now, and they keep falling short more often than not. A fancy ultrabook might get you seven or eight hours, but cheaper systems aren’t even close. The iPad, meanwhile, stayed up for over 12 hours in our web surfing test. With a device like that, there’s no need to worry about running out of juice or sitting near an outlet during use. Charge it overnight every other day or so, and you’re good. Heck, you don’t even have to shut it down, because its standby time is preposterous—something like a month, according to Apple.
  • It doesn’t get gross. Have you seen a consumer laptop after a few months of use? It’s a mess: crumbs in the keyboard, gunk on the screen, finger oil on the touchpad, food stains on the palm rest, and so on. The iPad doesn’t get anywhere near that filthy. All of the action happens on the touch screen, which is easy to wipe clean with pretty much any piece of non-abrasive cloth. I usually wipe mine on my t-shirt. The back doesn’t really get dirty, either, because it’s just a slick sheet of anodized aluminum. The buttons and connectors might gather a little lint or miscellaneous gunk here and there, but that’s nothing compared to a well-loved notebook PC.
  • It runs all the games you can buy for the platform. Intel’s integrated graphics have made some huge strides over the past few generations, but let’s face it: laptops without discrete GPUs are still iffy for gaming. If you’re a neophyte, there’s no telling whether or not a game will run well. That isn’t a problem on the iPad. Every title you can buy or download runs smoothly, and there are some shockingly pretty ones out for iOS. Sure, triple-A games aren’t available—but you can’t really run Far Cry 3 on an Intel IGP, anyway.
  • It makes consuming content delightfully easy. Everything is right there, a few finger taps and swipes away: movies, TV shows, music, e-books, comics, magazines… Even the web is more fun to browse on a tablet than on a laptop with a crappy touchpad. (And yes, most laptop touchpads are still really crappy.)
  • It takes data loss out of the equation. Hardware failures happen. So do thefts and accidental damage. Those events can mean losing years’ worth of data with a consumer laptop, but not so with the iPad. If the device breaks, you can just go to the Apple Store, get it swapped out, and reload your backup from iCloud. Your software and data will be pretty much just like you left them.
  • It looks pretty. People like beautiful objects. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t have invented jewelry, Art Deco, and German cars. PC laptops have gotten a lot prettier in recent years, but for the most part, they’re still pretty ugly. The iPad looks gorgeous by comparison—especially with a matching SmartCover. It doesn’t hurt that iOS’s candy-coated icons are a lot prettier than Windows 8’s drab tiles—or that text and graphics are razor-sharp on the Retina display.

For the price of the iPad and SmartCover, Aline could have snagged an Asus VivoBook X202E, which is selling for $549.99 at Newegg right now. I had a chance to play with that pseudo-ultrabook before Geoff got to work on his review, though, and I wasn’t impressed. The thing is abysmally slow, has a really ugly screen, and seems to run its fan continuously, even at idle. Geoff measured the battery life at four hours, which sort of sucks. Overall, I found it unpleasant and frustrating to use.

Sure, the X202E runs things the iPad cannot—things like Word, Excel, Photoshop, and a full-featured operating system with proper file management. If you need to do real work, then there’s no substitute for a real laptop (although you’d be surprised how much an iPad can do with a Bluetooth keyboard and Apple’s iLife apps). The thing is, however, most consumers already have an old PC they can use to write resumes or telecommute. Why should they buy a new laptop when a tablet can serve their other needs so much better?

I can’t think of a good argument.

When the iPad came out in early 2010, I thought of it as a nifty companion device for folks who already owned smartphones and laptops. Tablets seemed, in short, like gadgets for the technologically privileged—cool but unnecessary. Yet in three short years, these new devices have become something else altogether. In a very real sense, they’ve become highly compelling replacements for consumer laptops in non-productivity usage scenarios. That’s exciting… and, frankly, a little scary.

Comments closed
    • oliviadub11a
    • 7 years ago
    • NovusBogus
    • 7 years ago

    I would agree with the assertion that most users will use a tablet for consumption and a desktop for real work. Decent laptops will stick around as college students and professionals need the extra power, but the sub-$600 crappy ones won’t be with us much longer. Which IMO is actually good for us PC/laptop guys, becuase currently 4 out of 5 laptops on the store shelf are junk and won’t be missed.

    • kakao
    • 7 years ago

    My anedoctal evidence is the opposite. At home I have two desktops, two notebooks and a Nexus 7 tablet. The tablet does not see much action and I think it is quite good. Everybody is after the best notebook while I prefer my desktop. When someone wants some touch screen time they use their smartphones not the tablet.

      • KoolAidMan
      • 7 years ago

      Its probably because the Android tablet library is seriously lacking. Completely different story on iOS, the amount of high quality tablet optimized software is huge.

      Its all about the software.

    • galco093x99
    • 7 years ago
    • End User
    • 7 years ago

    Impressive

    [url<]http://www.uxproductivity.com/word-processor-for-ipad-and-iphone#.UQQhiaGjc84[/url<]

    • chelseyox9aa
    • 7 years ago
    • Arag0n
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]It runs all the games you can buy for the platform. Intel's integrated graphics have made some huge strides over the past few generations, but let's face it: laptops without discrete GPUs are still iffy for gaming. If you're a neophyte, there's no telling whether or not a game will run well. That isn't a problem on the iPad. Every title you can buy or download runs smoothly, and there are some shockingly pretty ones out for iOS. Sure, triple-A games aren't available—but you can't really run Far Cry 3 on an Intel IGP, anyway.[/quote<] That's why Android has worse user ratings than iOS. People buys an iOS device and most if not all things work for him. Android in the other hand, some do not appear in the market and plenty have device-specific bugs. You need to buy a top-seller Android device to make sure developers fixed/ironed the errors for your device.

      • votekick
      • 7 years ago

      As much as I’d like you to be dead wrong, my Asus Transformer Infinity (TF700) wont play youtube vids in full screen when its docked… I mean the dock is basically a stand in the case of media consumption. On the flip side,iPads aren’t a propper aspect ratio (4:3 I think), where 16:10 allows for HD plus space for controls. I’d consider this a drawback for people trying to phase out their computers.

      I’ve used apple and android, and I still prefer android simply because it gives me more freedom, and muti-tasking is at least easier to attempt, iOS devices give you 1 button, android without the soft buttons you can pull down the tray (guess I should know what it’s called) and open recent apps from there or depending on the phone/android version, toggle settings etc.

        • End User
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<]and muti-tasking is at least easier to attempt, iOS devices give you 1 button[/quote<] iOS Gestures - no button required [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx8czmuQrK8[/url<] I have a Nexus 7. I hate how Android deals with app switching. So annoying.

    • shaq_mobile
    • 7 years ago

    Title should be “Realization That Most People Had Laptops to Dick Around”.

    • beck2448
    • 7 years ago

    Trend towards devices you can put in your pocket will only accelerate as the technology progresses.
    Laptops will be geared towards student who actually need to type, some, but not all, business and the power user. Everything else you can do on a tablet or a smart phone.

    • BIF
    • 7 years ago

    I bought the iPad 3 with 4G LTE about 9 months ago and would not do it any differently except I’d buy the iPad 4 if it were today.

    I use a Brookstone leather folio which comes with a built-in bluetooth keyboard. When at home, the iPad spends half of its time outside of the folio and half of that time docked in my Alesis dock in the home studio.

    I just built a new i7 system, but it’s mostly purpose-specific. The iPad became my all-purpose machine on day 2. Here are just some of the things I use my iPad for on a day-to-day basis:

    1. Taking notes. Typewritten or handwritten, complete with circles, highlighted text, arrows, and other annotations.

    2. Secure and private email access, even from my employer.

    3. Fast web browsing and keeping up with my forums. About 25% of my comments and forum postings here on TR are from the iPad, and occasionally I will read or write from my iPhone too.

    4. Stock and investing research. My newspaper subscription and charting services are all available instantly on my iPad, even the night before the physical paper is delivered.

    5. Emergency weather alerts and amber alerts.

    6. The ability to nearly instantly respond to a family or friend via iPad (email) or iPhone (email or text messaging).

    7. The much-maligned Siri has been WONDERFUL for me. I can ask her the outside temperature BEFORE I forget to wear a coat, she reads my messages while in the car, and I can just tell her the name of the person to call for TRULY HANDS-FREE phone usage. She gets the spelling right for words I ask her to define, and she usually understands me very well; she gets it right a lot more often than my old Droid did. It used to be tedious to enter reminders and notes, so I never did it. But now I take advantage of that because it’s so easy. I dictate most of my text messages to Siri and make the few spelling correctons manually. It’s still faster than typing and in many cases, it’s even faster and less annoying than making a phone call.

    For those of you who don’t get it with tablets, I can understand. But try not to be stubborn. There’s tons I can do with my tablet, even though I am still a fan of PCs and laptops.

      • hiro_pro
      • 7 years ago

      i was about to plus one you until you oversold siri. most of what you said about siri is right but when siri is wrong she misses by a long shot. the other day she tried to call a dead cousin when i wanted her to text my wife.

        • BIF
        • 7 years ago

        LOL, you are right about missing by a long shot. And it’s almost always funny unless you hit “send” without proofreading. Yikes!

        BTW, you should probably remove your dead cousin from your contacts. Or maybe tell Siri that you can’t call him/her anymore.

      • End User
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]For those of you who don't get it with tablets, I can understand. But try not to be stubborn. There's tons I can do with my tablet, even though I am still a fan of PCs and laptops.[/quote<] Well put.

    • leor
    • 7 years ago

    I had a very similar experience with my girlfriend about 8 or 9 months ago. I got the ipad 3, and she inherited my ipad 2. At the time she had “stolen” my Alienware M11x, and the minute the ipad became hers and she configured it the way she wanted to, the alienware just sat around, at one point I don’t think it was even turned on for 3 months straight!

    She recently had to write some reports so the poor M11x saw some work time, but for the most part she never looks at the thing. While nothing will ever replace my beast of a workstation, I log more hours on my ipad either writing short responses to e-mails or looking things up and browsing than any mobile device I’ve ever owned, including laptops. It really is the kind of thing you have to have around to understand the convenience – the instant auto on, the fact that I only need to charge it once every 2 or 3 days, and never having to reboot, my current session is always right there, everything exactly as I left it.

    Looking at something in theory and actually using it as a part of your daily life are very different things.

    • dashbarron
    • 7 years ago

    [quote<]The iPad looks gorgeous by comparison—especially with a matching SmartCover. It doesn't hurt that iOS's candy-coated icons are a lot prettier than Windows 8's drab tiles....[/quote<] Eh, no. Depends which tiles you are talking about. You can color-theme the tiles and background to, you know, look the way you like best not the way Apple / the developers want you to. And the tiles are rather productive, providing live information. You no longer have to open the music app to see what is playing. You can get quick weather information without having to even move past the lock screen. Rotation photo carousel? Etc., etc. The live tiles are a huge boon to the Windows mobility platform and I'd take them over the relatively archaic iOS icons any day.

    • Laykun
    • 7 years ago

    I can’t help but think, from an interface perspective, that a touch screen is a step backwards as opposed to a step forwards from the modern day keyboard and mouse. Douglas Engelbart would be rolling in his grave.

    And yes I have used a tablet. I use them on a daily basis.

      • Anonymous Hamster
      • 7 years ago

      Engelbart would definitely be uncomfortable in a grave, given that he’s still alive.

      In my opinion, each UI has its place. It’s not one-size-fits-all. A mouse and keyboard work well when you’re sitting at a desk. A touchscreen is nice when you’re sitting on a couch. And a voice interface is probably a really good idea in the kitchen (and various other places).

      I’m still not sure what is the ideal interface when you’re walking down the street.

    • 5150
    • 7 years ago

    Comments TL;DR – I have different needs and require different hardware. YOU MUST SHARE MY SAME NEEDS!

    • loki808
    • 7 years ago

    I love editorials Mr Kowaliski and was glad to see you drag Aline into a place like this in an attempt to explain technology’s latest fad. I thought you were going to attempt an out of body experience and have a go at tracking down why that poor 13incher is gathering dust. You know, try and look at the tech world through the eyes of your lady friend. The concept sounded rather Gladwellesque… TEDish even.

    I must say though, of the 9 arguments you posted none of them sounded like they came from a person with a pink covered white iPad:) Are you sure they aren’t your own?

    PS German cars are a lot of things but “pretty” ain’t one of ’em.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 7 years ago

      The all-day battery life and the portability argument do – my wife is really bad (good?) at forgetting to plug stuff in. Her tablet (Acer A100) is often times dead when she wants it. The battery life is [url=http://www.engadget.com/2011/08/12/acer-iconia-tab-a100-review/<]consistently awful[/url<] and its idle battery usage is way higher than Apple's. It fits in her purse no sweat, though - she's got more of a small tote bag with a zipper than a purse, though. I guess I need to get her an iPad mini...don't tell her I said that, though. :p

    • Da_Boss
    • 7 years ago

    I think this article is spot on. Before getting my iPad, I didn’t think I had a use for it. I had an iPhone and a MacBook Pro, and adding a third device In between made no sense.

    Then I took the chance and ordered an iPad 4.

    In the months I’ve had one, I’ve realized that there’s something to be said about the portability of the iPad that you can’t say about a laptop. Not only that, it’s size and battery leave it better equipped for consumption than the phone. Between this, the app selection, and the brilliant screen on it, it’s proven to be much better device for 80% of what I do than both my iPhone and MBP.

    These days, all my casual browsing, RSS feed reading, and short emailing happens on my tablet. My phone has been relegated back to phone duties only, and my Mac is only used in heavier work like music production or longer gaming sessions. But in terms of sheer time, my iPad probably gets most of it.

    All I’d say to nay Sayers is that it’s not completely about its size. I’s the screen, the size/weight/power ratio, and its app selection that make this thing a media consumption beast.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    PC market shrank by 5%

    Well it’s not hard to believe, I mean most people in North America probably own at least 2 PC’s a desktop and a notebook, if not more.

    So if the majority do not have a tablet, and they are going to buy something electronic with their money why buy another computer when you can buy a new tablet???

    • ET3D
    • 7 years ago

    Judging by the comments, the world is divided into two groups: those who haven’t used a tablet and think laptops are the best, and those who have a tablet and it’s become their main computing device.

    Being a realistic person, I knew that a tablet is what I need. I enjoy the PC, but I don’t sit by it a lot, so I wanted something more mobile. I enjoy the Nexus 7 a lot, and while I agree it’s not a full PC replacement, it definitely provides many of its functions, including playing old adventure games (I’m currently playing Gabriel Knight 1 in DosBox Turbo).

    I also intend to stream games from my PC. I think that in the end that’s what a PC should be, a file and processing server. If I want to play games on TV, in my room and in the bathroom (watching the kids), there’s no point in having several computers in different places to do that. One PC server wirelessly sending the relevant screen would be enough.

    That’s the way I think things are going.

    • moog
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve noticed less tech-savvy individuals gravitate toward the chic iPad.

    Unfortunately I can’t live without my laptop, my Surface has been collecting dust these last couple months.

    For programming I use my laptop – there is no Visual Studio, Source Insight, or gvim for Apple as far as I know. My productivity would suffer without these editors and tools.

    For Netflix and movie watching – Roku + HDTV in my bedroom, Xbox + SmartTV in my living room. They’re gorgeous.

    For gaming – Xbox. I’m not satisfied with touch type games, very unsatisfying. I mostly play RPGs like Fallout, Tales of Vesperia etc., I doubt there are any satisfying options on these touch devices. Touch is too inaccurate.

    For news surfing – Actually here I liked the Surface, I could lounge in my bed and swipe through feeds. But I guess since my laptop is on most of the time, I’m too lazy to switch devices.

    And that about covers my major activities. So it seems I have too many devices in my house and the tablet loses almost all the time.

      • brucethemoose
      • 7 years ago

      That’s kinda why I dig these new touchscreen windows 8 laptops. They can get stuff done, but you can easily plop one down, get cozy, and use some of the nice streamlined metro apps for news/fun. Though I don’t have one yet, the apps I’ve tried in W8 preview are excellent. I can stream/plug in to a HDTV and use MadVR to satisfy my OCD about image quality. The AMD based ones have no problem running Fallout 3, and the smartphone covers just about every other possible base

      /offtopic

    • sydbot
    • 7 years ago

    I am also in the pro-tablet set. Since moving a month ago, I have not even setup my PC yet. The girlfriend’s iPad and my aTab hold me over for basic web use. For email, my phone is best. When I really need a PC, I just grab her laptop; something not needed very often. Portability is key here. I don’t have to banish myself to a desk in a seldom used room, although sometimes that would be great and I do miss my monitor. I can use it in bed, at the kitchen table, while I’m (supposed) to be watching the kids. Not playing borderlands 2 has got me feeling bad about the purchase, but for purposes of raising two fast paced toddlers, a lightweight, small tablet is perfect.

    • RazorSharpTM79
    • 7 years ago

    Oh Cyril..Your article sounds like car test comparison done by a German car magazine: the German car always wins even if the test is between a Mark 2 VW Golf and a 2013 Corvette. Here – the same: Apple uber alles.

    Seriously, while I consider the rest of TechReport pretty pristine in term of bias, your column stands out as some sort of “Apple product placement” within the pages of TechReport.

    Was it so hard to consider all tablets and offer a more general view on things, rather then going straight for the iPad and how it just does everything for you? I stopped reading your piece the moment I reached the marketing brochoure part where you’re highlighting the iPad’s features.

    Better luck next time!
    Cheers!

      • Cyril
      • 7 years ago

      The point of this blog post wasn’t to offer a “more general view on things.” The point of this blog post was to share an anecdote about someone switching from a laptop to a tablet—and to explore why they made that decision. My girlfriend switched to an iPad, so I talked about the iPad. If she had switched to a Nexus 10, I would have talked about the Nexus 10.

      I disagree with the notion that I’m some sort of disgusting fanboy for not pointing out that, yes, competing tablets [i<]also[/i<] have glass-covered touch screens, all-day battery life, easy-to-use software, etc. I think anyone who actually reads the entire blog post will understand that most of those perks aren't unique to the iPad.

        • brucethemoose
        • 7 years ago

        I will admit: at first glance, it did sort of come off as pro-Apple sort of thing. There is a lot of it on the web, so it’s an easy assumption to make.

        Once I actually started reading, it was clear that this is an anecdote about a product he happened to own: just like he said. It applies to the tablet as a category of computers, and isnt biased in the pro Apple sense. I understand your viewpoint, but don’t be so quick to judge Razor.

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      I’d take the Mark II VW golf.

    • cynan
    • 7 years ago

    You don’t really sound that convinced yourself, Cyril.

    Tablets have not changed much in the past 3 years. Sure, the addition of software, such as Office for ARM platforms, has expanded the amount of actual work you can do in a pinch. But make no mistake, the tablet is still rife with compromises for doing said work. A tablet is still only really suitable (outside of niche applications) for web browsing, email and media consumption. Put more harshly, it’s still a mobile computer for those who really don’t really [i<]need[/i<] a mobile computer (whether because, as you allude to yourself, you already have a primary computer or just don't need to do any real work on a computer very often). Yes, getting shiny new toys for Christmas is great (kudos on such a nice gift for Aline!). But the novelty will probably eventually wear off. A family member of my own received an iPad 4 this past Christmas as well - complete with a bluetooth keyboard. Beautiful device. After playing around with it for a few hours myself, however, I stand by my assessment. The cramped screen and keyboard, together with the lack of any integrated input device (trackpad) and watered down OS environment eventually show their true colors insofar as work use. And I'd wager, given another few weeks, if Aline has any real degree of work to do (even if just Office type software beyond typing out an email or 3) she will be dusting off the laptop (but you never know, cognitive dissonance can be powerful). For the majority, tablets are entertainment devices. Period. The scope of the vast majority of Apps available for these devices support this. Yes you can do some work on them, but if you're not fooling yourself, and have the full PC option, that's where you'll be returning to do any real work (unless you consider pretending to write novels in coffee shops real work).

      • End User
      • 7 years ago

      As a PC enthusiast (3 systems with a 4th in the planning stages) I have to totally disagree with you. My tablet (iPad 3rd gen) does a heck of a lot of stuff – way beyond an “entertainment device”.

        • cynan
        • 7 years ago

        But if you could only have one or the other (PCs or tablets), which would you choose?

        I didn’t mean to convey that tablets were entertainment-[i<]only[/i<] devices. But that they are first and foremost entertainment devices - and pretty much the reason why they are purchased (if not the reason used to rationalize the purchase - not necessarily the same thing...). Sure, you can do a lot of work on them - it's just that this comes with more compromises than if using a full PC. I can imagine a not too distant future where tablet-sized computers (that perhaps dock into more full featured work stations complete with larger displays, etc - not the cramped mobile keyboards that, say, are available for the iPad) will become affordable enough to take over a large chuck of the market for computing needs. That day, however, has not yet come.

          • End User
          • 7 years ago

          As an enthusiast I have to have everything. As a realist I see that young people are growing up with tablets – no PCs in sight. 20 years from now do you think we will be a PC centric society?

    • mutarasector
    • 7 years ago

    Bottom line: platforms such as the Asus Taichi are the future of fully powered and functioning x86 mobile computing.

    Anything else is just a toy…

    • Lazier_Said
    • 7 years ago

    Many of the laptop’s failings are self inflicted marketing wounds. Selling the quantifiable meant painting themselves into the corner with the GB race, the GHz race, the screen size race. 5400 rpm disks aren’t less sluggish for having 900GB free. Uselessly fast processors demolish 6 cell batteries. Jagged TN screens are as ugly at 17″ as they were at 14″.

    Fixing those things won’t make a laptop the better portable TV over a tablet designed from the ground up, but they’d go a long way to making it a better laptop. Perhaps enough better that some people would choose to spend time working with a computer instead of veging with a tablet.

    • chuckula
    • 7 years ago

    Sing it with me!

    Some Systems OC me, some Systems Game me
    I think they’re O.K.
    If they don’t give me hipster street-cred
    I just walk away

    They can boot and they can benchmark
    But they can’t see the light, backlight!
    ‘Cause the smartphone with the cold hard aluminum case
    Is always System Right, ’cause we are

    [Chorus:]

    Living in a Post-PC world
    And I am a Post-PC Fanboy
    You know that we are living in a Post-PC world
    And I am a Post-PC Fanboy

    Some towers cooldown, some towers glow out
    That’s all right with me
    If they can’t slow my typing rate then I
    Have to let them be

    Some CPUs try and some GPUs fly but
    I don’t let them play
    Only tablets who take my pennies
    Make my rainy day, ’cause they are

    Living in a Post-PC world (Post-PC!)
    Living in a Post-PC world
    [repeat]

    PCs may come and PCs may go
    And that’s all right you see
    My fart apps have made me rich
    And now they’re after me, ’cause [b<]EVEN NEELY's[/b<] Living in a Post-PC world And we are all Post-PC Fanboys You know that we are living in a Post-PC world And we are all Post-PC Fanboys A Post-PC, a Post-PC, a Post-PC, a Post-PC Living in a Post-PC world (Post-PC) Living in a Post-PC world [repeat and fade as your battery dies]

    • Vulk
    • 7 years ago

    I was given an iPad2 as a gift 2 years ago, and boy howdy. It went from a ‘well what am I going to use this for’ to basically my back brain. I use it every day to take notes in and record meetings. I listen to podcasts with it using Bluetooth headphones. I have it with me 90% of the day and use it to check server status’s and run basic maintenance tasks… Doing that took me 4 hours writing a bunch of PHP and ASP.NET, but was still time well spent. I prefer managing my email with it (still fire up my desktop or laptop for longer ones, but most emails are only a few sentences, and are easy to do while walking or doing something else)… I read on it and stream linda.com training videos on it at night, it’s replaced my other computers as my digital companion, and it’s all because it’s big enough to do real work on, but still portable and easy to use while moving.

    So yeah, I really get it. It’s f’ing handy, and I see why my grandparents only have iPads, and never touch the PC I gave them 2 years back. My wife would kill for one, and my 2 year old daughter LOVES MINE and covets it with a passion that is hard to contain. Even my 8 month old son has a pretty good grasp on how to use the damn thing, he’s better at playing puzzle apps on it than walking. Seriously.

    And let’s face it, what does a new computer do today that your old one doesn’t? Wonder why that market is slowing down?

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 7 years ago

    Another cool thing about them is the vast amount of really cool software there is that takes a few seconds to download and is completely free. “Expensive” means it costs 5 whole dollars.

    Enjoy all this cool stuff while we have it. These are the good old days! The War’s comin’, kids.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Wow, you don’t say! If only there was some way to search for, download, and install programs ranging from free to a few dollars or voluntary donation on a PC…someone should really invent that!

        • Tamale
        • 7 years ago

        I totally understand your sentiment, but have you EVER watched someone who’s NOT the type to read a site like TR actually do what you just suggested? Search out for something to do X, read reviews, compare options, download, install, try, potentially repeat? I haven’t either.

        If I didn’t install the good freeware apps like pdf creator, 7zip, cdburner xp, vlc, etc, on my friends’ and families’ computers, they never would have done so – the app store was brilliant and is probably the biggest reason all these other devices are starting to run away from windows. It’s kinda like how the internet was a huge deal on its own – it opened up people to new ways to use their computers – and the app store does an even better job of that because you run stuff natively instead of waiting for every operation to go over the internet.

        Make no mistake – someone who knows what they’re doing can still do far more on a PC, but for people who never would’ve taken the time to learn how to do all that, something like an iPad, iPhone, or Android device seems to offer far more ‘out of the box’ functionality. Soon, there will be things that you can’t even DO on the PC anymore since developers will target ios and android alone and skip the windows app entirely. It’s already starting to happen – look at games like infinity blade. No way to play that on windows!

    • puppetworx
    • 7 years ago

    Leo Laporte of TWIT calls tablets ‘appliances’ as opposed to computers, which I’ve always liked because tablets are about getting simple, common computer tasks done conveniently – with minimal options to learn about. If you’ve already learned all the options that you have to perform a task on a computer then you will probably find using a tablet an inconvenience, if you don’t know about or understand those other options however you’ll probably be in love with tablets. Choice is always heralded as a good thing for consumers but the market still buys Apple.

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    [b<]Laptops suck because they're slow.[/b<] I don't care where the blame is but you pick up a tablet and you're reading/watching/tweeting within five seconds of first handling the device. A laptop (even a fast one with an SSD) gets you as far as the windows loading screen within five seconds if it's really fast. Fifteen seconds in we are looking at a login screen where we have to type our password, then Windows farts about some more, snatching focus away from you midway through typing a word, or chugging away as 100 services and background applications deal with waking up from sleep or are loaded for the first time. You mash the internet button as soon as humanly possible, and if you're lucky you've managed to reach a web-browser within 45 seconds of picking up the laptop. I on the other hand, now swipe-unlock my phone, press one button and speak my request. The content I wanted in about two seconds. Ten seconds later, armed with the information I picked up the phone for, I lock the phone and it's back in my pocket. I believe consumer laptops have their place, but they are no longer the best device for casual email/internet/social networking like they used to be, and this is what 90% of the population want to do most of the time.

      • Ryhadar
      • 7 years ago

      I completely agree. The portion of computing devices that are going to be hit hardest by tablets/smartphones is the conventional laptop.

      Desktops being sold will probably be about the same as they’ve been recently even with tablets. Reason being is because if you bought a desktop over a laptop in the first place, you’re more than likely not going to switch it out for tablet at this point.

      • NeelyCam
      • 7 years ago

      1) Don’t shut off your laptop. Sleep it instead.
      2) If you’re comfortable about your phone not having a login password, you shouldn’t need one on your laptop either.

      Meanwhile, I can actually [i<]type[/i<] on a laptop. Typing with a tablet/phone is an exercise in frustration. I'm still waiting for Deanjo's video about typing 60WPM on an iPad.

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        [b<]1) Sleep uses something like a third of the battery every day;[/b<] "Sleep" with a half-empty battery on Thursday Morning and by the time you want to check the news with your coffee & bacon when you wake up on Saturday, it's completely dead, or shuts down as soon as you resume. Have you gained background updates to your Facebook, Twitter, email whilst it's been asleep? No. Do your notification icons flash to tell you about unread stuff? No. Does Flash, Java, Firefox, Windows, and your AV want to update and restart instead of letting you use your laptop? Oh yes. [b<]2) Locks? They can all be broken if someone actually wants your info.[/b<] Pattern lock - somewhat insecure. Pin - slightly more secure. Having someone break into your flat to steal your ipad/phone/laptop from under your nose? Priceless. At any rate, they're going to format it and get it down to the pawn shop ASAP before you report it....

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          Why wouldn’t you plug it in when you’re not using it for an extended period of time? Do you never plug in your phone/tablet?

          All that background stuff will come as soon as Haswell ultrabooks hit the scene

          [quote<]Having someone break into your flat to steal your ipad/phone/laptop from under your nose? Priceless. [/quote<] If you can't keep track of your crap when it's "under your nose", your crap deserves to be stolen.

      • sschaem
      • 7 years ago

      “Your using it wrong”

      I just tried it on my netbook… 3 second from the moment II press the power button to the time I see Chrome with 7 tab opened. Including PDF document, map service, search page, etc.. Sub second to switch tabs.

      If you are comparing cold boot to cold boot, ok. But you do that what? 4 or 5 time a year ?

    • brucethemoose
    • 7 years ago

    But how long will it last?

    My family literally just replaced their aging P4 desktop which was… 10 years old. People are still holding on to Core2 business laptops from ~2006 and later, and they’re still far more capable than the current iPad. By the same token, an ultra-portable tablet thingy with Haswell, Ivy Bridge, or even Trinity/Richland/Kaveri/Kabini and flash storage should stay quick for years (bloatware aside), as they have way more horsepower than consumers actually need, and there are no software restrictions.

    But look at the original iPad from less than 3 years ago. Apple enthusiasts tend to boast about the longevity of Apple products, yet Apple has already stopped supporting the original iPad with software updates. iOS 5 made it very slow, there is no iOS 6 support, meaning that it’ll lose support from apps that require, iOS6, iOS7, etc.

    [quote<]I can't think of a good argument. [/quote<] Sure, Apple's A6X iPad may be fast now. But in 3 years time, it'll be ancient history... and you'll have to shell out another $500. $1100 for a very good laptop (without many of the listed problems) for 4-6 years vs $525 + $525 for a tablet every 2-3 years is a perfectly good argument. EDIT: Also, the other problem is the father of the tablet: the smartphone. Why buy an iPad when you can get an iPhone, or a Nexus tablet when you can get a Nexus phone. They're more functional, far more portable, only a little less powerful, and the potential to connect to bigger screens is certainly there (though mostly unexploited so far). If you only use a computer occasionally (meaning you don't have a smartphone/laptop), an ARM tablet is perfect. But if you already have a smartphone and/or laptop, current gen tablets are hard to justify.

      • nexxcat
      • 7 years ago

      [quote=”brucethemoose”<]If you only use a computer occasionally (meaning you don't have a smartphone/laptop), an ARM tablet is perfect. But if you already have a smartphone and/or laptop, current gen tablets are hard to justify.[/quote<] I have an iPhone, iPad and a high-end laptop. I use them all very frequently. The iPhone is for when I'm seriously on the go. It's brilliant for when I'm waiting in queue, when I'm waiting at the doctor's, etc. My iPad is for when I'm on the couch and need to read something or look something up. The laptop is for content creation. If I'm doing something that requires typing, well, nothing beats a high-res screen and a keyboard. If I need more screen real estate, there's the 27" monitor that's a hot-plug connection away. I wouldn't say one is more functional than the other -- I miss the portability of my phone when I'm trying to schlep the iPad, and I miss the larger screen of the iPad on my phone. Having said that, if I had to give up 1, it would be the iPad, since it's neither powerful enough to be a content creator nor portable enough to fit in my pocket, so I kind of see your point.

    • tarateh00aa
    • 7 years ago
    • sschaem
    • 7 years ago

    I have a list equality as long about all the downsides, many include your ‘perks’
    ex: I have yet to see an iSomething that doesn’t look gross because of that greasy film all over it.

    I have a netbook for mobile computing, and side by side with an ipad3 (haven’t checked the 4) the netbook CRUSHED the ipad3 in performance. And for apps like google earth the functionality is so limited on tablets its laughable.

    etc…

    I cant argue about portability. But my 3lbs (including cover that also act as a keyboard) netbook was $270 (320GB HD, 4GB ram, flash card reader slot, …) so spending 600$ for less made no sense to me.

    Yet, I also agree that the PC market (low end desktop and laptop) market will be reduce by maybe 80% because the current PC users are not really PC users.
    They will buy anything that let them check email, buy something on amazon, and read tweets.
    PC are overkill for just those tasks.

    For the 20% of true PC users , the schools kids people with a business, creative artists etc… this mean that soon their tool will probably double in price, or they will have to settle for less HW.

    So all this is great news for the “tweeters” .. but for the rest of us, we need to accept that our HW wont be subsidized anymore by people that never needed at PC in the first place.

    And what is the difference between a windows8 netbook and a windows8 tablet with a keyboard? It seem to me tablet will evolve to be netbooks… So not much is changing after all for that low end market.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      Okay, you’ve been warned, but this time you’ve gone too far. Stop trying to reason with a fanboy. It won’t work. Just stop it, you’re embarrasing yourself.

      • Bensam123
      • 7 years ago

      Netbooks… Sschaem captured pretty much anything I’d say on this too. Tablets are stupid and should diaf.

      Perhaps, someday, we’ll get a manufacturer that would make a netbook with a swivel screen… After they get over this whole detachable keyboard nonsense. They’ll probably eventually attach the keyboard permanently to the tablet after they realize the keyboards will get broken or the contacts will go bad after so many ‘attachments’… Then they’ll make the screen swivel on the tablet because people simply want to fold the monitor over on the keyboard (why would you want it to slide?)… Then you’ll have a netbook with a swivel touch screen, only with worse specifications, more expensive, and a locked down OS. Something we had on laptops a decade ago.

      Tablets are completely backwards. If you want something light and simplistic for everyday use a netbook with a swivel screen is where it’s at. It’s sorta surprising Acer and Asus abandon netbooks without exploring that.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        $400-$500 for a ‘good’ tablet versus $200-300 for a netbook. Not very surprising to me.

    • Samlind
    • 7 years ago

    Looking at that mighty iPad 10″ screen, it is the prefect potty rig. OTOH, sitting down to 3 24″ monitors in Eyefinity mode with a 5760×1080 desktop leaves the iPad in the loo ready for the next excursion. Wash your hands.

    • Spotpuff
    • 7 years ago

    Hey everybody this guy has a girlfriend!

    Ok now that that’s out of the way…
    I still find browsing on my smartphone horrendous. I like it better on my desktop. I don’t have a laptop though, except at work, and yeah it’s awful.

    • Ryhadar
    • 7 years ago

    I can agree with a lot what you said, Cyril, but I would swap out tablet for smart phone (at least for girlfriend and me).

    When it comes to computing my girlfriend and I usually follow this workflow:

    Need to do some light browsing/gaming? Whip out the Smartphone
    Need to do serious web browsing or light producitvity/gaming but still want to be on the couch? Take out the netbook
    Everything else? Desktop or HTPC

    • Sabresiberian
    • 7 years ago

    I’d say that tablets work for people that previously owned a computer – that really didn’t need a computer to begin with. The fact is, there are a lot of people that have computers in their homes that just gather dust. Some people bought them because they thought they should to keep up with the times, and people are buying tablets for the same reason.

    If all you do is social networking, why do you need a full-blown computer? Previously you did because it was the only device that could let you do those things, but now it is not.

    That being said, people are doing exactly what I expected them to – buy “tablets” with a keyboard. Personally, I’d argue that a tablet is no longer a tablet if you use a keyboard with it, but that’s not important except that the sites that report sales of these things are going to call them tablets, so the numbers are going to show a relative decline in “computer” sales and an increase in “tablet” sales. Whatever. They are doing the things I always said they’d do, provide something to protect the screen while carrying it around and add a keyboard. Not a tablet in my book, but it is to the numbers guys.

    A better OS and docking or seamless interfacing with your desktop setup will complete the picture, I think.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      I use an Xbox controller with its docked keyboard. Is it no longer a console controller? I have a Samsung 46″ internet-enabled HDTV and use a wireless keyboard and mouse for its “Smart TV” apps. Is it no longer an HDTV? Are tools defined by their usage or uses?

    • PixelArmy
    • 7 years ago

    A touch interface is good for many things, but I just find it too inefficient for [i<]identical[/i<] tasks. Try opening a dozen shortbread links. Or even typing this post with BBCode. Or just moving lines of text around. See which is faster. Right-clicks are now timely long presses. Typing is slower. Fingers are a lot wider than a mouse pointer, making selection difficult. *EDIT* Spurious line break.

    • Shouefref
    • 7 years ago

    I basically agree with the idea that the stronger tablets become, the more functions they will fulfill which until now have been fulfilled by real pc’s.

    But I also think this article is a bit too much centered on iPad’s.
    The matter is that lots of things done with pc’s are purily consumption of video’s and especially… text. That means: reading text. In the form of reading websites and reading all kinds of documents, besides fiction.
    It’s much more sensible to use a tablet to do that than a fullblown pc ore notebook, because tablets are more flexible (you can use them anywhere, yes, even on the toilet), and they use less power. Moreover, the absence of fans gives more reading and viewing pleasure.

    Those quaiities are inherent to all tablets, not only iPads.

    There are also some odd remarks in the article, like: It runs all the games you can buy for the platform..

    You can read it the other way round: there is lots of stuff you can’t get for us.

    And that’s the point:
    maybe you can’t read MS Word, Exell, PowerPoint documents on your iPad, but I can on my Google Android 4.0 !
    And that for less than half the money!

    This is also stupid: It looks pretty.
    They go to all the effort to make a good looking tablet, and what happens? The customer puts it in a PINK cover!

    And this is onesided again: It doesn’t get gross.
    Neither does my Android looks groos, for the same reasons.

    # It’s cool and quiet.
    So does my Android.

    It’s supremely portable.
    So does my Android.

    It takes data loss out of the equation.
    That’s NOT true. You still have to keep your credentials somewhere, our you can’t use that iCloud thing.
    Moreover, some people don’t like to use the cloud, for good reasons.
    So that’s not really a valid argument.
    Anyway: you can use cloud protection with any computer linked to internet.

      • trackerben
      • 7 years ago

      [i<]And that for less than half the money![/i<] You forgot to mention you usually get about half the build quality, resale value, and buttons. Unless you get the Nexus and forego the physical UI. And 100% certainty of 0day exploits, 100x more malware, and totally certified non-coolness by credentialled experts.

        • Shouefref
        • 7 years ago

        I was wondering what I did get that -4 for…

        Build quality….
        Do you care about build quality if you by a new thing every year? Because that seems to be what Apple expects us to do. Than it might be more sensible to pay less for something that breaks down after a few years, and to replace it by a new and more powerfull at that moment, without having to care about that hassle of selling it to fund the new thing.
        So I don’t know about that build quality.

          • NeelyCam
          • 7 years ago

          [quote<]I was wondering what I did get that -4 for...[/quote<] You implied Android is as good/better than Apple in the comments section of a pro-Apple article. This is where all the Apple fans go to feel better about themselves. Downthumbs should be expected

          • trackerben
          • 7 years ago

          Android phones definitely have more diversity, I’m looking to get an unlocked dual-core, dual-SIM Lenovo or Sharp since there’s nothing similar yet from Apple or MS/Nokia.

          But when all your connectivity goes via a single failure point, you must weigh the quality and availability of the system. Much of your time will be spent handling your phone and communicating with relevant people or doing relevant things, so where is the value in your waking life then? Will you just make do with whatever device when you will be practically married to it, or are you out to find a nice zinger you won’t have to make excuses for?

          I would get tested brand and well-reviewed model for these reasons, but then such better-built and -specced droids aren’t usually half the price, these cost more like 80-90% of their iPhone or Win8 equivalents.

      • davidbowser
      • 7 years ago

      I agree that all his points are valid for Android tablets as well as iPads, but I think Cyril’s example was just the specific case and not something special about iPads.

      I don’t understand the whole “no MS Word, etc.” thing. Granted that there are no OOTB capabilities, but there are at least 4 different office suites available. Does the Windows RT even come with Office OOTB, or does it require an app purchase? My quick search indicates, that although Windows RT comes with Office RT, it is for personal use only and any “real business” must purchase a commercial use license for Office RT.

    • bfar
    • 7 years ago

    Whether you just browsed the web occasionally or designed space rockets for a living, there was a time when PCs & laptops were the only game in town. For the former crowd it was akin to bringing a tank to a pillow fight. Tablets/smartphones are nice because they address the needs of that group at a generally cheaper price point and a more portable form factor. PCs are still nice because they address the needs of the other guy.

    PC devices are not declining; that’s only market speak for stock brokers who are only interested in the performance of specific companies. PCs are simply diverging in design in order to address the specific needs of different markets. This is not a bad thing, and everyone can still have their cake.

    • Bauxite
    • 7 years ago

    “It doesn’t get gross.”

    Sorry, but that is only an anecdote, and I have plenty of my own that run the opposite direction.

    As for a fact, it turns out they are all filthy: a typical high-usage item such as a keyboard, cell phone, tablet, mouse etc, it is dirtier than a typical toilet seat.

      • Shambles
      • 7 years ago

      If you’re a pig, sure your keyboard will be gross. But that’s your own fault.

      On the other hand the second you use a tablet, or touchscreen phone it starts getting dirty. Like many things in life if you don’t want to get something dirty, don’t each nachos over top of it.

      • ludi
      • 7 years ago

      That’s because the average toilet seat is made of a continuous smooth surface and is cleaned regularly, often with powerful disinfectants. Interestingly, the same is true about a tablet surface, if you are so inclined. Whereas keyboards tend to accumulate all sorts of things and are much harder to clean, which was Cyril’s point.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 7 years ago

    I have to admit, I’m one of “them.” My company bought me an iPad (woot!) and since then my 3-monitor aging desktop is only used for school duties. I can do almost everything I need to on the iPad, including print, study, Google, email, etc. Sure my desktop and wife’s laptop are “better” but they are not all the things you pointed out above.

    To the rest of you, just call me Benedict.

    • someuid
    • 7 years ago

    “whereas as once we imagined a world”

    “they will be exception”

    “instead allowing them to age out and shifting consumption”

    Holy crap. How many grammar fails can you get into one paragraph?

      • brute
      • 7 years ago

      obviously not as much douchebag as you can get into one post

      • Rakhmaninov3
      • 7 years ago

      Probably due to the iPad’s autocorrect.

      😛 Sorry Cyril, had to.

        • Cyril
        • 7 years ago

        You’d have to ask Gartner’s PR folks what they typed that up with. 😉

        [url<]http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=2301715[/url<]

          • Arag0n
          • 7 years ago

          If those numbers are accurate and expecting half of the million surface RT sold to be USA based, Surface RT may be the single best selling Win8/RT device last quarter.

    • RickyTick
    • 7 years ago

    I think it’s become apparent that computers (both desktop and laptop) have been grossly underutilized by a large percentage of consumers for the past decade or so. Millions of people bought pc’s from say 2000 to 2010, and now realize that everything they do can easily be done on a tablet.

      • someuid
      • 7 years ago

      Yeah, you got that right. I found myself recommending a tablet to a co-worker the other day. All they do is email, facebook, check the news and play a game of solitare. I told her a small laptop was overkill for that and a nexus 7 or 10 would fit the bill.

      And now I don’t have to worry about weekend calls about virus programs not updating and what are these patches, etc etc etc.

        • sweatshopking
        • 7 years ago

        [quote<] And now I don't have to worry about weekend calls about virus programs not updating and what are these patches, etc etc etc. [/quote<] have you used android? [url<]http://www.crn.com/news/security/240000735/report-android-malware-growing-exponentially.htm[/url<] you still have to worry about both those issues. Yes, the play store does SOMETHING to prevent it, but it's slow, and misses them sometimes [url<]http://www.gizmochina.com/2012/10/20/dangerous-virus-stay-in-google-play-store/[/url<] android is all the crap from windows, just adapted to a touch screen.

          • wierdo
          • 7 years ago

          I think the point is the app store handles the virus tech support in his place, so less tech support headaches for him. That’s how I understood the comment at least.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            How does the store handle tech support?

    • odizzido
    • 7 years ago

    You know, one that that is really crap about tablets compared to a laptop is that if you are just laying down in bed you have to hold it up constantly. With my 10 inch laptop, it just sits on my chest and I don’t need to touch it to read what is on the screen.

    • Metonymy
    • 7 years ago

    I finally took the tablet plunge (I don’t have a smartphone) when the Nexus 7 was made available with ATT cell service. I thought I’d only use it for email when not at work or home. Given that I live in a 1 BR apt with many screens, TV/computer in every room, etc, I never understood why anyone would want a wifi version – or rather, why *I* would ever use one.

    Five weeks later, I admit I was wrong as hell. I still want the cellular connectivity (both for email and because with a BT keyboard and VXconnectbot I can log into linux work servers from away from a computer, if necessary, and do real things, including vim editing), but I’m amazed how much I enjoy it at home.

    I love being somewhere reading and not having to do to the computer to check emails. And I never though I’d prefer watching movies on this than on my high-res monitor. It’s just so damned easy.

    I realized that this reminds me of what I used to say to people when they asked why I liked my kindle (the older keyboard one) so much. I realized that the answer was that while on the subway or even in bed I could read so many different things and switch without effort. And the nexus provides the same sort of flexiblity.

    As I type this I understand it’s a bit a though I’d just stumbled on electricity two months ago and am all enthusiastic about it too.

      • Rakhmaninov3
      • 7 years ago

      I never imagined how much I’d use a tablet until I got a Nexus 7 for Christmas, either. I’ve barely used my PC since getting it because now I can lay flat on my back/fat ass and do all the same stuff in front of the TV. Then I take it to bed with me and fall asleep to it playing Netflix on its pretty little screen.

      It’s really awesome for Google Sky, too. And reading books/studying from electronic texts.

      And I’m addicted to Strikeforce Omega and haven’t spent any real money in the game yet.

      Won’t take the place of a real computer for reports/papers/extended periods of research or Diablo 3 but it does a whole lot more, a whole lot better, than I thought it would before I had it.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        Don’t you find it terribly slow even for basic web browsing? On any halfway modern PC websites come up more or less instantly, or are at worst limited by the server or internet connection. Tablets always seem to render webpages very slowly to me.

        p.s. It’s best for your sleep to limit screen time within a minimum of 30 minutes of bedtime…falling asleep to TV or whatever is very bad for your sleep.

          • raddude9
          • 7 years ago

          I have a Nexus 7 and a powerful PC, there’s very little difference between the two for web browsing, pages may pop up a fraction of a second slower on the tablet, but you have to really pay attention to notice.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Maybe I should check out a newer tablet. I don’t think I was limited by wireless when I had one (wireless N router, but then maybe it was kicking down to G due to other devices) but the rendering and/or wireless was always just so slooow, like 5-10 seconds for a page watching that progress bar. I’m not used to waiting for a progress bar unless it’s due to something on the other side of my router. All my PCs are hardwired GigE too so I’m not conditioned to think wireless is the norm in general.

        • TakinYourPoints
        • 7 years ago

        If you’re getting utility now then step up to iOS when you’re ready. The difference in app quality and selection is staggering, main reason I’m on the platform.

          • alphadogg
          • 7 years ago

          If you get staggered by that, you have some seriously weak knees.

          Both platform have all the key and most popular apps. Software selection may have been an issue three years ago, but it is pretty much a dead issue now.

          (Admittedly, Android has maybe 5000 idiot-quiz, running games and fart sound apps vs iOS fielding 50K such apps, but I did not get staggered by that factoid.)

            • TakinYourPoints
            • 7 years ago

            On phones it is take it or leave it. iOS has better apps but given the physical platforms (smaller screens, less likely to use more apps) and them being “close enough”, it isn’t a dealbreaker.

            Tablets are a different story. Tablets are app machines and the tablet-optimized app selection on Android is very weak in comparison. Upscaling single-column phone apps doesn’t cut it, nor does a halfass redoing of the UI, just compare something as simple as the Yelp apps on iOS or Android. Games are an even bigger difference, most of what I have on iOS isn’t available on Android nor are there any plans to. The closest thing is Baldur’s Gate, and there is still no release date.

            Going to an Android tablet would be either a significant downgrade in app quality or losing apps entirely. Blame is partly on a smaller Android tablet userbase, and part of it lies on Andy Rubin who believes that a phone app is “good enough” on a tablet.

            That is nonsense, a UI should be purpose built for limited and fixed display sizes. When I get something like Alien Blue or Reeder on iOS, I know that I’ll be getting an app optimized for their respective platforms: single column on a phone and multi-paned or grid on a tablet.

    • Halnerd
    • 7 years ago

    I recently talked my wife into buying a Nexus 7 32G tablet. We love it. Her first impression was…ooh, there’s a Pinterest app? ooh, there’s a Facebook app? ooh, there’s a bunch of Yahoo apps? ooh, I can watch Netflix on this thing. etc, etc, ad nauseum. She very soon realized that nearly every activity she engages in on her 400$ Lenovo laptop, she can do on the Nexus 7 faster, easier, cooler, with better graphics, and for longer periods of time without charging. The ONLY reason she still uses her laptop is watch streaming TV content that is in flash, like ComedyCentral, NBC, FOX, CBS shows. If those companies made half-decent apps for Android she would spend ZERO time on her laptop. I completely understand what Cyril is talking about in this article.

    BTW, my wife works 12+ hours a day in a medical laboratory. Many posters on this site apparently assume that if you don’t use computers for “productivity” you must not be a productive person. You are idiots. Wake up.

      • willmore
      • 7 years ago

      I hate to point out that you can still install flash on the nexus 7. Can I have her, now, unused laptop?

        • Halnerd
        • 7 years ago

        I don’t think Android 4.2 runs Flash natively, and I am not about to hack a brand new tablet and muck with a perfectly functional, warranteed piece of hardware.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      If she can do things ‘faster’ on the Nexus 7, as in things actually execute faster not that she is just inefficient using a PC, there is something seriously wrong with the Lenovo. Also, I hope she and especially you aren’t being fooled by the simple psychological trick of transition graphics which only gives the impression of ‘fast’.

        • Halnerd
        • 7 years ago

        Faster in this context meaning more intuitive UI for her to use, not in terms of raw power or performance. She is not a computer person and finds the tablet much easier to navigate, especially finding new apps to install, in contrast to searching the Web for programs on a PC. The closed environment of a tablet is really helpful and less confusing for someone with her limited experience.

        Graphically, if you compare the 12×8 7″ screen with the Tegra 3 of the Nexus vs. the 13×7 15.6″ screen and 2nd gen i3 integrated graphics of the Lenovo, the Nexus looks better in most situations, especially streaming video. So, no I am not “fooled by the simple psychological trick of transition graphics”. Give a guy some credit wouldya. The nexus looks great in every usage scenario I have put it through, often better than her laptop.

        I, on the other hand, am an avid computer hardware nerd, with a gaming desktop and solid laptop. I play mainstream PC games, use office production software for work (college instructor), and audio production software for my bands. I would never trade my comps for a tablet, but she and I are totally different in our computer usage (which is exactly what Cyril is trying to address in the article). I think the many consumers are going to find their usage model closer to that of my wife than of mine, which is completely at odds with the population of people who frequent this site.

        For what it’s worth, I still like the Lenovo laptop we own. It is a great value product and has served my wife’s tech needs really well prior to the tablet.

    • Goofus Maximus
    • 7 years ago

    Rather than the tablet, I’d say the PC is losing out to the smartphone, since most of what most people do doesn’t require more than that, and in addition, it aggregates all the things they need (including GASP! a phone) into one device. Why buy two, when one does the job?

    computing will be relegated to the server rooms, as the fast and/or wireless internet finally makes the dream of the “thin client” come true. Nvidia is trying to make this true even for games, as they showed in CES.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      Wait, you can use smartphones to make phone calls?? CONSIDER MY MIND BLOWN.

    • dragosmp
    • 7 years ago

    Among my friends there is this same tendency, to buy a new tablet in stead of a laptop. The thing is among them, not many can justify paying 1000+ for a fast laptop. Nexus 7 and even (to my amazement) the Kindle Fire seem to replace laptops for two of them just fine, a few only use phones. They do have laptops for when they “need” to do something, but they haven’t been upgraded this year. Some might probably buy SSDs this year, some not even that.
    Admittedly such a small population makes an extrapolation to the whole world to seem implausible, but it does ring true. I can’t justify paying 600$ on a passable laptop when for 400$ I can get a nice Nexus 10 and my SSD-infused Core Duo laptop can continue to to the heavy lifting when needed.

    • FireGryphon
    • 7 years ago

    Windows 8 tablets bring tablets even closer to edging out desktops. You can get them with a real desktop OS, run real desktop apps, and use a real desktop keyboard seamlessly in conjunction with the slick tablet experience you outlined in this article.

    • Arag0n
    • 7 years ago

    There is no way that iPads as they are now can substitute laptops…. as you say, they may replace consumers that have totally no use for any productivity thing, but it will never replace the laptop any student from mid school to PhD needs, neither the laptop any researcher/developer/freelance/office worker/etc needs.

    Tablets are a cool toy, the only tablet I know with a smart chance to substitute laptops for some professionals is the Surface RT, Vivo Tab and Lenovo 11 RT.

    I know no few people that feels their iPad useless because it can do very few things his iPhone does not already do. People is starting to realize the fact, and that’s why cheaper tablets are becoming the rule for consumers, why pay >$500 for few extra functionality and just a bigger screen to do some things you already can do?

      • Beelzebubba9
      • 7 years ago

      How big is your TV? How larger are your computer screens? Because size doesn’t affect usability, I assume they’re both <20″ because why would you pay extra for anything larger?

      I know that’s a bit of a silly point, but I’m surprised that [i<]anyone[/i<] would question the usability difference between a 4.5" screen and a 10.1" one. Also, it's 'few', not 'phew'. The former means small in quantity, the latter is an expression of relief. 🙂

        • bfar
        • 7 years ago

        For trivial applications, I see your point.

        But for any complex activity, small screens are horrendously uncomfortable to work with, and it has a noticeable affect on productivity. At work, I normally have an average of 10-15 apps/windows open at any given time. Some applications demand plenty of screen space to be useful, compilers & interpreters are a good example.

        If I was allowed I’d replace my 19′ with a larger screen in a heartbeat.

          • Beelzebubba9
          • 7 years ago

          I’m typing this post from a workstation with four Dell 2007FPs attached, so I totally agree with the value of screen real estate. I mean really, who would want to use all of this crap:

          [url<]http://grab.by/j7UC[/url<] On a single 19" screen? 🙂

        • Arag0n
        • 7 years ago

        It depends the user. People that mostly uses chatting-social apps, sees few benefit from larger screens. People that mostly plays, or surfs the net, like to have a bigger screen to do so. But still, that people agrees that the iPad at >$500 is way too expensive given you just play some games and visit websites. No few people is choosing the iPad mini because that. Before the mini, the iPad 2 was selling better than the 3/4 at most countries.

      • sweatshopking
      • 7 years ago

      i know you’re not a native english speaker, but the term you want is “few”. “phew” is a sound made when somebody is relieved.

      edit, i see beelze beat me 🙂

        • Arag0n
        • 7 years ago

        Fixed, ty

      • madseven
      • 7 years ago

      Don’t forget the Lenovo Helix…It looks pretty cool

    • The Dark One
    • 7 years ago

    A big part of Apple’s genius is limiting the range of a user’s interaction with a product and leaving them happier as a result.* It runs all the games- that are allowed on Apple’s carefully curated store. The content you can get through it is great, but only if it’s in Apple approved formats. Everything you have on it is backed up, but what sensitive data could you actually load onto it in the first place, aside from emails that would be on the cloud anyway?

    But it doesn’t matter, because they’ve presented the device in a way that emphasizes its (many) legitimate strong points, and many of the things they’ve sacrificed to do it are only important to grumpy people like me.

    *This also applies to people trying to buy one model from a big list- the bigger the selection, the less satisfied the customer will be with their choice, even if they were able to chose one specifically tailored to their needs.

    • windwalker
    • 7 years ago

    So you’re suggesting she has only done “non-productivity usage” for a month.
    No e-mail, calendar, task management or personal finance for that entire time?

      • Cyril
      • 7 years ago

      No, but when I wrote the word “productivity,” I wasn’t really thinking of someone answering personal e-mails, setting appointments in a calendar, or filling out a to-do list. 😉

      I was talking about tasks involving non-trivial amounts of content production. So, for example, writing essays or resumes, filling spreadsheets, putting together presentations, editing videos, making music, etc. The iPad can do most of those things, but not yet with the same level of speed and flexibility as a PC. Firing off an e-mail or setting a calendar appointment, on the other hand, is pretty quick and painless on any decent tablet or phone.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 7 years ago

        I’ve got to disagree, even writing a simple response the same length as what you just wrote is painfully laborious on a tablet.

          • Arag0n
          • 7 years ago

          Yeah, it’s a pain in the ass to write something that goes further than 3 sms length….

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            Wouldn’t it be amazing if hardware keyboards could be connected via an open standard to pretty much any modern tablet?

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i don’t understand this. why would you want to carry around a keyboard. just get a laptop. it makes no sense to me. i understand transformers, but i don’t understand ipads and bluetooth keyboards. it’s dumb.

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            You don’t understand the draw of a device with a screen better than any laptop available for less than $1700 that will reliably see a 10+ hour battery life regardless of workload with built in cellular connectivity that weighs less than 2lbs with a keyboard added in?

            Ok!

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            I don’t understand why you’d carry a keyboard around. its dumb

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            I mean I don’t carry a keyboard and my iPad around, that’s what the MacBook Air is for. But a $1800 laptop isn’t really topically appropriate now is it? 🙂

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            Then we are agreed.

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            But at the cost of $1000!

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            no. you’re confusing things. i can buy a decent laptop for 500$ now. was in FUTURESHOP today, and dell ultrabooks were 450$. Aluminum ultrabook, for 450 AT FUTURESHOP. it’s going to get at least 5 hours, do WAY more than an ipad, and costs the same. is the screen as nice? no. does it have a full OS? Yes. does it have a keyboard? yes. did it have 500gb of storage (mixed with an ssd for caching) vs 32gb? yes.

            There are trade offs, but pretending that you have to spend 1700$ on laptop to get a good one is bat poop crazy. ONLY if you ONLY concern is PPI would you EVER pay that much for a computer, and outside of the MBP, i can’t think of a single pc that costs 1700$.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            I’d be happy to build you a PC that ‘costs’ $1700 and make a 60% margin 🙂

            • NeelyCam
            • 7 years ago

            I’ll do it for $1500

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Wooooh, race you to the bottom. Remember, second place is just first loser!

          • ludi
          • 7 years ago

          Then you probably don’t spend much time using a tablet. What I’ve found is that I quickly retrained myself to use autocomplete — start typing a word, and when the correct one appears, tap it and move to the next one.

          I’m not going to do any deep writing exercises that way, but for quick emails, forum posts, and FB comments, it works fine and fast.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            Nope, I had a firesale Touchpad for quite a while. I used both WebOS and Android (Cyanogen) on it. The ‘problem’ of typing on tablets is inherent to their form factor. You’re either holding it with one hand and end up one-hand typing, or have it propped up some how in which case you’re not using it very differently from a laptop. Not to mention a 9-10″ wide keyboard is freaking tiny if you do want to use it two-handed.

            As for autocorrect…teehee. Come on, you’ve seen the autocorrect comedy sites. Typing on a real keyboard is still faster. My hand isn’t required to be between the display and my eyes, I have instant access to every single key (no secondary keysets like numbers, or special characters) and there is tactile feedback of some kind. For very short input touch is fine, but to me that means less than maybe 15 words. And yeah I’ve seen the kids who text like mad so part of it is training, but those kids are also very fast on keyboards.

          • nafhan
          • 7 years ago

          If she’s only making a few “simple responses” a day and the laptop needs to be turned on, maybe recharged, etc. it’s no longer easier to do that simple thing on the laptop.

          There’s definitely a tipping point somewhere, but for many people, making succinct responses to email or forums would not be that tipping point where using a real PC makes sense.

        • designerfx
        • 7 years ago

        yep.

        Same here as far as productivity.

        I bought my wife a nexus 7 and she uses the laptop for work only. Aside from that she doesn’t even like using a laptop 99% of the time anymore, exceptions being when sites don’t load right in chrome (even desktop version).

        transition period was about 2 weeks and then it was “how did I live without this?”

        • shank15217
        • 7 years ago

        This was the same argument used against desktops and it works because most people who use computers do not go past web browsing (reading) and emails (light word processing) so for most of computing history computer usage has been over exaggerated. However as soon as you get past casual use and into media creating, programming, complex document creation, the most effective platform becomes a large monitor, a table and a comfy chair.

      • bfar
      • 7 years ago

      I think you’d be surprised at how much functionality a tablet can replace in the home, at least within the realms of consumption applications. Work is a different matter.

      I do agree that they are far too expensive, but then so are all PCs.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        I was thinking the same thing. All the tasks he mentions are actually items that I do on the tablet.

          • sweatshopking
          • 7 years ago

          I’m sure you do. no matter how painful.

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            …I do all of those on my iPad as well.

            I can’t speak for you, but I find a lot of the same people that insist tablets are useless are also the same people that have never adapted their workflow out of the Windows PC ecosystem. As someone who uses pretty much every major OS every day (no seriously – Windows, Windows Server, Android, iOS, OS X, and most days, Linux via CLI) I’m honestly surprised when people demand that work is impossible or very obtuse on anything other than a Windows PC with a keyboard and a mouse.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i use most OS’s regularly (just removed my hackintosh installation, still have windows server, linux mint, android tablet, windows 8, wp8), and i think for the most part, work is obtuse on anything other than a windows pc.
            I use office 2013, and libre isn’t close. if i’m writing an essay, it’s MS office. If i’m doing heavy excel work, it’s MS office. OSX is the same. it’s not close to as good. THAT BEING SAID, THAT’S TYPING. the other thing i mainly use my computer for is gaming, which sucks on everything but windows. sure, i can type an email on my android tablet, but it’s less work just to grab my laptop in the long run. I have only a few hours experience with an iOS tablet (tons with phones and ipod touches), and almost none since ios6, but it’s not how i’d like to do pretty much any work. it’s ok for news.google.ca, but even TR sucks, as i HATE typing on a tablet. It’s MUCH worse than a smartphone even. tablets are the worst for typing. that’s not to say it’s impossible, nor do i really care if people use tablets for work. But, when it comes down to ACTUAL work, like, let’s make a 4 work sheet excel document tracking customer accounts (it’s an example, i realize you’d probably import it from your peoplesoft, or access) even with a keyboard on your ipad, you’ll be FAR behind somebody on a desktop.

            • Beelzebubba9
            • 7 years ago

            What about MS Office makes it a requirement for writing an essay or the type of really basic spreadsheet usage that makes up 95% of what I see in business? I did technical writing/documentation control for a while, and though I understood MS Word better than damn near anything else at the time, I use Google Docs for most of my own writing. I’m not saying you or anyone else should do the same, but the edge cases in which Word is a distinctly superior tool don’t apply to 90% of how I’ve seen it used. Most people just use Word and Excel because that’s all they know, not because it’s the ideal solution, and since all they know is basically tied to a PC, then there becomes the false notion that you must use a PC to do word processing.

            To be quite clear, my work-workload is pretty absurd and definitely requires either a decent workstation or a MacBook of some sorts because f**k this degree of multitasking: [url<]http://grab.by/j7Yk[/url<] on a tablet. I'm trying to get my employer to buy me a rMBP since that'd be pretty much the best of all worlds minus the eye watering pricetag. 🙂

            • indeego
            • 7 years ago

            Last time I used Google Docs it screwed up the formatting and didn’t have half the common fonts we need. It isn’t WYSIWYG. It is asssssslow. Gmail is unbearable “loading” on common tasks. (Fine for consumer use.)

            I don’t understand how companies have migrated to it for serious work. At least in the industries where how things look are vital.

            Having said that LibreOffice does provide 90% of the functionality of Word, and we can use it as backup to MSOffice. It’s gotten pretty good.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            I’ve basically given up on Windows for everything but gaming. It has gotten so bad that I have Windows 8 i7-920 system with dual 2560×1440 30″ displays doing nothing.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]if i'm writing an essay, it's MS office. [/quote<] Why? Basic text editors have everything you need these days. What is it about Word that you need?

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<]my android tablet[/quote<] Which one?

            • MadManOriginal
            • 7 years ago

            [quote<] I find a lot of the same people that insist tablets are useless are also the same people that have never adapted their workflow out of the Windows PC ecosystem[/quote<] Golly gee, that sounds like all the Windows 8 haters!

            • bfar
            • 7 years ago

            You might be missing the point. Sure, anything as complicated as typing is horrible on a smartphone. less than ideal on a tablet and even a bit uncomfortable on some laptops. But the thing is, for many people, much/most day-to-day stuff at home doesn’t necessarily involve any typing, just clicking or tapping a few icons.

            I own a Galaxy S2, an iPad and a high end custom desktop (with great quality monitor/keyboard/mouse/desk/chair etc). While clearly the desktop is the ‘master’ of all trades, I’ve been impressed at how much use we’re getting out of the tablet; mainly web browsing, movies and viewing photos. It’s made a semi permanent home for itself around the couch & coffee table, and saves me having to get up and turn on the desktop to do something trivial such as getting a local business listing, or checking a map for directions.

            Clearly anything that involves work is different. I couldn’t imagine using a laptop (not to mention a tablet) in my job. In fact I see people at work who use laptops exclusively, and I wonder how the hell they get anything done on those tiny keyboards and screens (I excuse those who use docking stations). Anyone that says corporate workstations will be replaced by tablets has never done a hard day’s work in their lives!

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            i didn’t miss the point at all. I even own an android tablet, smartphone, high end desktop as well. that being said, i don’t touch my tablet at all. it is too painful to use android jellybean. i hate it. THAT ASIDE, i was more or less just making fun of deanjo and calling him a fanboy. seems to have been missed though, as you both replied seriously.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            What is your Android tablet and your problem with it? I ask this because I’m considering getting a Samsung Tab 2 10.1 as a spare voice/data mobile and upgrading it to 4.1 when it’s available.

            • sweatshopking
            • 7 years ago

            It crashes, apps are generally poorer quality than ios or even wp8. But, generally, it just isn’t an ideal device for much. Even Netflix is awful. Its buggy as heck, and crashes quite a bit.

            • trackerben
            • 7 years ago

            Is it a Samsung or one of the China brands? I hear keep hearing from others about these issues with Android on tablets. My alternative is to get a dual-SIM Lenovo P770 to accomodate my two plans. Android malware is a big issue but as I plan to use it mainly for basic voice/messaging and hotspot functions I figure to avoid the issue by doing web stuff on my iPad or a Surface RT.

            I would have preferred a WP8 phone but there don’t seem to be any dual-SIM models. If Apple were to come out with one that would change everything though.

            • End User
            • 7 years ago

            I think he runs Android on his HP Touchpad. Hardly a good starting point for comparison.

            • mutarasector
            • 7 years ago

            I quite agree, some of those tasks are indeed painful to do on an iPad. I really get tired of hearing the repeated mantra “I can do all those things on an iPad”, but seems to always be appended with a “at least for mainly content consumption” qualifier.

            Transformers are real >work< platforms out of the box, not iPads. What I’d like to see is Asus come up with something more along the lines of a hybrid transformer/Padphone device that allows the phone to be docked in a transformer keyboard/battery base, but with the phone’s touchscreen facing up on just in front of the keyboard being used as a touchpad for the hybrid, and it’s processor as a coprocessor to the main processor in the detachable tablet. I’d go $1000 – $1400 for such a setup.

            Bottom line: Tablets (in general) just aren’t quite there yet.

            I also fixed one of those “-“‘s forya.

        • designerfx
        • 7 years ago

        Actually, I think the only true limitation is not work or not – it’s just a performance requirement. Since tablets, etc are designed to be more efficient/low power devices, it doesn’t work for:

        highly demanding games
        professional video editing/etc
        hosting servers, etc.

        Admittedly if ARM continues down the route it’s going, it’ll probably continue to be ARM servers as well.

        • madseven
        • 7 years ago

        you must be talking about macs:)

    • jjj
    • 7 years ago

    It’s funny how people equal productivity with the keyboard just because that’s what productivity is for them.
    Productivity, content creation, can be many things. On phones and tablets, developers just need to figure out how to adapt old tools and invent new types of content,creation that these new devices can enable.
    The keyboard equals text,nothing more,you could kinda use a typewriter instead of a PC if the keyboard is all that matters.( damn it now i want a typewriter than can do gtalk- how hilarious would that be?).
    Throughout the article you do mention some limitations that are ipad specific but that doesn’t have to be the case with all OSes,if you are gonna talk about tablets don’t focus on the “dumb ” and expensive ones.
    Going forward the “productivity” software for phones and tablets can only get better, maybe Ubuntu gets some share and we get an OS with a decent desktop mode, a quad A15 is not that wimpy so it should be fun.
    To end this ,i’ll have to say that …. tablets are almost dead anyway,with any luck we get flexible screens in a few years and phones can transform into tablets so we might as well just forget about tablets.

      • travbrad
      • 7 years ago

      [quote<]The keyboard equals text,nothing more,you could kinda use a typewriter instead of a PC if the keyboard is all that matters.[/quote<] Touch equals rubbing your fingers on stuff, nothing more, you could kinda use a concrete block instead if touch is all that matters. Of course the keyboard isn't "all that matters", but instead how it interfaces with the OS/applications. It's pretty hard to publish a webpage, email a friend, compile some code, or play BF3 with a typewriter. Even simple typing is a lot better on a PC too (instant error correction, font changes, etc) Touch does some great things that keyboards can't and keyboards do some great things that touch can't. We should just try to use whatever works best for a given use.

    • cycomiko
    • 7 years ago

    My ipad gets filty, but I have children that also use it. Its in a case, and even the back of it gets filthy. Cloth works for the front, but moistened towel works well for the back. The speed is relative. My iPad 2 doesn’t work as well as the ipad 4, doesn’t play everything as well yada yada yada.

    I use my netbook (to be upgraded with a haswell *something* in the next year) and ipad routinely, often for similar things. Windows lets me do a whole heap of stuff that my ipad cannot do. The ipad lets me do it in different places with a spare hand.

    I suspect that my perfect PC would be a slider, or flip. But they are currently too heavy. Sure they are lighter than they used to be, but still have a long way to go until they are as light and thin as an ipad, but have a keyboard that works nicely, and battery that carries on for a long time.

    Now I wish that iOS6 did not mess up the battery life, so i could get back to charging them less often.

    • just brew it!
    • 7 years ago

    Been seriously thinking of teaching myself how to do Android development. Seems like an interesting (and prudent given that I make my living as a software developer) thing to do!

      • Decelerate
      • 7 years ago

      Go for it! I’d even suggest to check the other side of the pond too (iOS development) if you can, if only to spread your overall experience.

      There’s nothing wrong with knowing more.

        • Beelzebubba9
        • 7 years ago

        That and my understanding is there’s much more money to be made on the iOS side of the fence.

      • RickyTick
      • 7 years ago

      fwiw, My nephew does it and really enjoys it.

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