iOS 7: replacing the elegant with the tolerable

If I had to describe the totality of Apple’s hardware design during the final years of Steve Jobs’ tenure, I would use one word to do it:

Elegant.

My iPhone 4 was elegant. When I got it, I would often take it out of my pocket just to tinker with the software and to admire the hardware. It was sleek, sexy, modern, and fast. It was like Scarlett Johansson in a red dress or George Clooney in a tuxedo. It wasn’t just effortlessly desirable; there was something special about it, a magnetism that made you want to keep looking, and staring, and admiring.

The same goes for many Apple products I’ve used over the years—my old aluminum MacBook, my new iPhone 5, the wired aluminum keyboard on which I’m typing this blog post. Even the lowliest of Apple cables and connectors have an elegance about them. Sometimes, when I have to charge my phone, I’ll take an extra moment just to look at the Lightning connector—and then I’ll plug it in, and I’ll get a small whiff of satisfaction from the way it clicks into place. This doesn’t happen consciously. Something about Apple’s hardware design just seems to trigger that kind of reaction.

Apple owes this all to one man: Jony Ive. Sir Ive has been in charge of the company’s industrial design for close to two decades. Recently, he was put in charge of human interface design, as well. iOS 7, the first release to bear his mark, came out yesterday, and millions of Apple users rushed to download it.

I was one of them.

I was excited about iOS 7. As an admirer of Ive’s hardware creations, I was excited to see what he’d contribute to the software side of things. Plus, iOS was starting to look a little dated. Some of the UI widgets had been around since the release of the original iPhone in 2007. Seven years is a long time. In seven years, even the prettiest thing can start to get tiresome. It was high time for a new injection of elegance.

Well, I’ve been using iOS 7 for about a day now. I’ve used it on my iPhone and on my girlfriend’s iPad. I’ve poked around the UI, agonized over a new wallpaper selection, and rearranged my home screen icons.

My verdict? It’s okay. It’s a little bit cleaner, a little bit brighter, and a little bit more colorful than the previous release. Apple has added some nice features, like Control Center, and it’s made much-needed improvements to old ones, like multitasking. The animations look neat, although they do make the phone seem a little slower. Using iOS 7 kinda makes you feel like a disembodied spectator sometimes—unlike iOS 6, which was very fast and responsive.

For the most part, though, iOS 7 is okay. It’s new enough not to look old, and it’s pretty enough not to look ugly. It’s fine.

And that’s exactly what’s wrong with it.

There’s no elegance anymore. No magnetism. Nothing about the way iOS 7 looks makes me feel happy to be an iPhone user. Nothing about it makes me want to poke around the interface just to admire it. There’s some mild curiosity, perhaps, but no admiration. Nothing like what I get from looking at Apple hardware and holding it in my hand.

Part of the problem, I think, is that Apple went overboard with simplifying the UI. Simple design is good, but make something too simple, and there’s real a danger of it losing its identity. Some of the new iOS 7 apps, like the Calendar app, remind me an awful lot of Google apps. The Apple version is usually a little nicer, a little cleaner, but the difference is subtle enough not to matter much.

Some of the icon and button designs also feel a little half-baked. The Safari icon looks sort of sad. The Music icon has an angry red-orange gradient. The Reminders icon is kinda nondescript, and the Calculator icon is bland and not pleasing to the eye. In Safari, three of the five buttons in the bottom bar have pale blue outlines and a roughly rectangular shape, so they’re instantly forgettable (and a little tricky to tell apart at first).

Then there are the new, over-saturated backdrops that clash with the icons and obscure the text labels on the home screen. See the image of the iPhone 5C variants above. Where’s the elegance? Where’s the charm?

iOS 7 will no doubt be improved, refined, buffed out. Jony Ive will hopefully get better at the whole UI design thing. But until then, iOS 7 will dilute the elegance of Apple’s hardware with a look and feel that’s merely tolerable. At a time when Apple’s dominance is being challenged more than ever, being merely tolerable is very dangerous.

Comments closed
    • amadeus
    • 6 years ago

    I agree with you Cyril, but the design question is an issue which preoccupy Apple since introduction of Lion. Leaving the coloured icons was the first step and many users have been frustrated. The human eye distinguish better colours and not luminance differences, which we have when using greyed icons. This make tired.
    With iOS 7, is the big next step to a new kind of digital design. A sign for, “we are now digital”. Yes a computer is digital but never human beings. All the more a design get abstract you create design for a smaller circle of users. Those who share your view.
    In my opinion Apple loose more and more the contact to their users, leaving in an ivory tower. When a design should enjoy, like Apple announce their design, then because a design give you a feeling to have something valuable in your hand, looking at and using it. Like you describe it. But the new design is somehow cold and to loveless as using with pleasure.
    Right the next day after iOS 7 was out, you could find the first advices in the internet how to recover iOS 6, to have the old design.
    What a pity, a clear design in the hardware and a ambivalent result in the application.

    • BIF
    • 6 years ago

    iOS 7 is easier to read, so I’m happy.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 6 years ago

    I’m amused at how first-worldy these problems are.

      • Chrispy_
      • 6 years ago

      You are reading a hobbyist/enthusiast site. Everything here is first-worldly.

    • vamsy
    • 6 years ago

    So much fuzz about colors and wallpapers. I must say I am not satisfied with this article. I expected more from Techreport.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      That’s the biggest change. What did you expect? There are a couple useful things but the biggest user-facing change is the bright UI.

    • ThorAxe
    • 6 years ago

    I’ve used iOS, Android 4.3 on my GN and WP8 on my 920 and WP8 is by far the easiest and nicest OS of the lot. It’s not even close. Live tiles are brilliant and Nokia Pro Camera is the icing on the cake.

    • moog
    • 6 years ago

    Gaudy.

    iOS makes Windows look elegant. In Windows there is intentional restraint – clean black spaces, clean and simple symbols.

    • confusedpenguin
    • 6 years ago

    You have to give Jony Ive credit for the first time around. Going from expertise in designing something three-dimensional to making something look good in two-dimensions is probably a totally new adventure. I don’t know much about Jony, so I don’t know if he’s done software interface before. On another note, the Droid interfaces totally suck. Confusing and complicated, you have to really pay attention to know what your clicking on. Another rave for my Windows 8 Phone, it just takes a quick glance to know what your looking at and what your clicking on. Great if your using it while driving. Illegal to text and drive here in Idaho, but there is no law against doing anything else on the phone while driving, like surfing the web. 🙂 But yeah. Droid is the worse, and the iOS 7 interface will probably get more elegant over time with incremental updates.

    • --k
    • 6 years ago

    In the field of usability, opinions are like a-*oles… The proof is in the usability testing. I would suggest Cyril give it a few more days to acclimate himself to the new design before passing judgement. In UX, the look (design pattern) is trivial to update, whereas functionality of the OS takes more thought and deliberation.

    My problem with the press’ response (not just TR) is that tend to harp on the surface and not the functionality, and for the most part this hasn’t changed. This is akin to the automotive press talking about how sexy the design is without doing any benchmarking.

    • MarkG509
    • 6 years ago

    I just “upgraded” my iPad2 to iOS 7, and have to agree with your more negative comments, based on 10 minutes of playing with it. Honestly, my very first impression of Win8 was better than my first impression of iOS 7. I’ll give it some more time before making any decisions about going back to 6.3. After 2 months of Win8, I actually did go back to Win7.

      • WaltC
      • 6 years ago

      Maybe slightly off topic, but you should give 8.1 a whirl, with the following caveat: you *must* use Classic Shell (It has three basic functions, but I use only the start-button/menu function) version 3.9.5 (the latest, and I think by far the best.) It has run options that allow you to pretty much shut down all of the RT user interface–or just the parts of it you don’t wish to see–which you don’t need anyway unless you are running a touchscreen. And, it’s freeware! I don’t use a touchscreen and so have no need for any of the RT UI. The good thing about Win8/8.1 Pro is that the RT user interface is not required!

      But, hey! You might have a touchscreen…!…;) If so, I still recommend 8.1 as it is a free update to anyone who bought 8.0. I had Win7x64 on a separate partition–it now seems clunky and awkward–so I deleted Win7. Oddly enough, in terms of software backwards compatibility, 8.1 is better at that than 8.0. A new .exe properties/compatibility option for 8.1 is, believe it or not, 8.0! Yep, you can actually set up compatibility mode for windows 8.0 when you run Windows 8.1. That’s kind of a hoot, isn’t it?

    • tipoo
    • 6 years ago

    I agree with much of this, I think in the desire to get over skeuomorphism they threw a lot of good out with the bad. It’s the same problem I have with Office 2013, there’s too much white space. Felt and leather? Sure, get rid of that. But when the buttons have no indications they /are/ buttons, they just appear as a word and nothing else, that takes my brain a bit of extra processing to figure out. There should be *something* there to anchor it as a button, to gently remind your dumb brain that it is, indeed, a pressable icon. A good UI is supposed to subtly guide your eye around what is important, these new overly minimalistic UIs sometimes miss the boat on it.

    And besides all that, iOS7 quite frequently clearly drops below 30fps on basic UI animations on my Mini, at least with parallax wallpaper left on. Everything about it just seems to take a bit longer for the iPad to think about before doing, too. It’s not just the animation making it seem longer, Ars Technica tested it and things actually take significantly longer to load. Half a second more doesn’t seem like much on a chart, but half a second more each time you open something you use frequently does make you enjoy using it less.

    • Joel H.
    • 6 years ago

    Almost all the backgrounds I see have patterns. Can you opt for something in a smooth gradient or flat black color?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      Can’t you have your own wallpapers in iOS? Just download something sufficiently large and gradient. Or make something.

        • End User
        • 6 years ago

        Yes.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 6 years ago

          OK the answer just seemed so obvious I thought I was missing something. lol

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 6 years ago

    FYI, for those of you who aren’t happy with iOS 7, it is still possible to downgrade to iOS 6.1.3 (or 6.1.4 if you’re an iPhone 5 user). Just download the required ipsw file for your device (google is your friend) and restore it from iTunes. Apple may block people from being able to do this in the future, but for now it can whet your iOS 6 whistle.

    I’ve been on the Beta versions since June to make sure our Apps didn’t explode when iOS 7 was released, and while the UI changes aren’t for everyone, I find that I do like the new functionality that was added. Once you get used to it, it’s not so bad. It’s just a bit of a shock to some people at first.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 6 years ago

    Just got a space grey 5s this morning. It’s great!

      • sparkman
      • 6 years ago

      Me too. The fingerprint reader is impressive and the low-blur camera is quite a nice upgrade.

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 6 years ago

        I went to a trampoline park with my friends and had a blast with the slo mo.

          • trackerben
          • 6 years ago

          Would any of you know if there are third-party cases for the 5S already?

    • tootercomputer
    • 6 years ago

    Geez, all this looking and admiring the elegance and magnetism of previous versions of iOS. Sounds like you had way too much time on your hands.

    • 223 Fan
    • 6 years ago

    iOS 6 -> iOS 7. Better, worse, same as Win 7 -> Win 8 in terms of UI alienation?

      • StainlessSteelMan
      • 6 years ago

      What’s so alienating about iOS7, comparing to iOS6? There are some extra colors and a few extra features on iOS7, but everything works about the same. All apps work on both systems.
      And may I say, the only “alienation” I felt about W8 compared to W7 was losing the Aero Theme, but other than that, all is fine (in Desktop mode, that is).

        • 223 Fan
        • 6 years ago

        That’s the kind of input I was looking for. Yesterday I had to restart the print spooler on my daughter’s Win 8 machine and I used the search capability to do it. I never use search in Win 7 because I never have to. Now, Metro may be a better UI in the long run but it is alien compared to Aero.

      • End User
      • 6 years ago

      With iOS Apple added to the UI. With Windows Microsoft added a second UI.

    • DPete27
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Part of the problem, I think, is that Apple went overboard with simplifying the UI. Simple design is good, but make something too simple, and there's real a danger of it losing its identity.[/quote<] Apple as a company was built on the philosophy of keeping things simple (K.I.S.S. theory). So to say that when they make things simpler, they're losing their identity is arguably and incorrect statement.

      • cphite
      • 6 years ago

      Apple as a company has been built on the philosophy of elegance… it’s more than just keeping things simple. It’s keeping them simple in a way that works. You often hear the phrase “it just works” thrown around – that’s pretty much been the driving force behind Apple, especially in the mobile device aspect of their business.

      I think what Cyril and others are saying is, it seems like this version is just making things more simple for the sake of making it more simple. There doesn’t seem to be any other driving force behind the changes… and that is where it loses some of it’s identity.

    • Meadows
    • 6 years ago

    A veiled disclosure of Mr. Ive’s sexual orientation.

      • NeelyCam
      • 6 years ago

      You see what you wanna see

        • Meadows
        • 6 years ago

        Oh no I don’t, I think iOS is ugly now.

          • Deanjo
          • 6 years ago

          Why? It brings all the Metro looks to iOS? Tonka toy icons for the simpletons.

            • Meadows
            • 6 years ago

            It doesn’t even look like Metro. Ditching textures and “3D” shading of UI elements does make it look flat and “modern”, but the use of colour gradients, rounded edges, and a blur effect further transform this modern state into something ridiculous.

            I’d rather pick neither, but if I [b<][i<]had to[/i<][/b<] pick, I'd go for Modern UI at this point.

        • faramir
        • 6 years ago

        I want to see Halle Berry nekkid. I don’t see Halle Berry anywhere in those images.

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 6 years ago

        Can’t blame him. Jony is a good lookin man!

    • LukeCWM
    • 6 years ago

    I looked at the comparison at this link: [url<]http://osxdaily.com/2013/06/11/ios-7-vs-ios-6-visual-comparison/[/url<] (I'm an Android user, so I have no stake in this.) Truthfully, I like two thirds of the old icons much, much more than the new ones. Most of the new ones look too simplified and toy-like. And for the rest? Honestly, it looks a lot like Windows 8 and the Modern UI: look at the mail interface on iOS7, or the texting interface, or the weather, or the Siri window (all from the link above). The colors, fonts, and spacing all remind me of Windows 8. And you know what? I'm okay with that. I think those things look good, and are an improvement over those images of iOS6. (Disclaimer: I use Windows 8 at home at Windows 7 at work. I like the behind the scenes improvements of Windows 8, don't like a tablet interface for my desktop, accept the new general UI of boxiness and fonts and styling, yet miss Aero. And Start8 makes my experience very Windows 7-like.)

    • jdaven
    • 6 years ago

    First impressions from a tech savy person like Cyril are very important. However if you need an indepth look at the iOS 7 because you won’t be using anything else, go to Anandtech.

    [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/7343/the-ios-7-review[/url<] At least the OS is a little quicker on older phones than iOS 6 according to some benchmarks.

    • GENiEBEN
    • 6 years ago

    Jony, la gente esta muy loca, what the f*k!?

    • Forge
    • 6 years ago

    What did you expect from a man who mis-spells his own name in pursuit of kitsch?

    Jony is pronounced “joan-ie”. The Y is treated as a pseudo-vowel here, since it’s making the ee sound and not the yih sound.

    Seriously, we standardized spelling rules in the English language many hundreds of years ago so that we didn’t have to guess or fudge a spelling. Let’s not abandon that just yet, and particularly for something so trivial.

    I had my hate on for when Prince became a symbol pronounced “prince”, but at least he didn’t just arbitrarily change the use of Roman letters to do it.

    Back on topic, Apple has lost it’s way. Jony Ive is running to do all the things that he used to argue with Steve Jobs about. All the things Steve forbade, Jony is doing them all, and it reminds me of nothing so much as a teenaged child who has moved out from their parents’ house, and is studiously putting their feet on the chairs, leaving the dishes in the sink, and yelling in the house.

    Steve said that multiple groups had done studies that determined that 9″ was enough for a good tablet computing experience and 6 or 7″ was not, and that’s why the iPad was the size it was. Steve dies, Jony releases the iPad Mini, at the 7″ size that Steve hated most! Steve said it was important to hold onto the perceived eliteness of the Apple brand, to never make affordable products because they would be seen as cheap, and what’s Jony doing now? An all-plastic cut-price iPhone! Wooo! F U DAD! I’M RUNNING IN THE HOUSE. YOU CAN’T STOP ME.

    Meh. Wake me up when Jony realizes there were reasons for all these rules, as Apple sinks back into the obscurity it enjoyed in the mid-nineties.

      • StainlessSteelMan
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]as Apple sinks back into the obscurity it enjoyed in the mid-nineties[/quote<] Only this time they can't call Steve back to help them.

      • alloyD
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]Jony is pronounced "joan-ie". The Y is treated as a pseudo-vowel here, since it's making the ee sound and not the yih sound.[/quote<] Precedent: Tony

        • StainlessSteelMan
        • 6 years ago

        And Joey.. Like in Joey Tribbiani, for instance… how YOU doing?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 6 years ago

          Kinda stretching for that Friends reference (there’s an e that has its own set of rules in there), but +1 anyway because it’s one of my favorite shows.

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      Actually, I would pronounce “Jony” as “Johny” (or “John-ie”) because of the convention between John and Jonathan.

      If you shorten “Jonathan” to “Jon” (pronouncing the same way as “John”), you notice that, despite the same pronunciation, the “h” is left off because the “h” in “Jonathan” is used for a completely different “th” sound.

      You could make a case for “Jonny” to distinguish pronunciation, but that adds an extra “n” to the name, which one might want to avoid (see names Matthew, Mathew, Matt, and Mat). There’s also some elegance to replacing the remaining sylables of “Jonathan” with a single “y”.

      /nerdiness

    • internetsandman
    • 6 years ago

    I know I’m part of a minority, but despite my deep desire to upgrade to a better phone, and get rid of my iPhone with iOS 7, all of my experiences with android, while brief, have been negative. I had an original transformer that got infected with malware that took over my emails, my music player is android based and the only reason I got it was for the capacity and sound quality, and I recently tried to switch to an HTC one but the sound quality of both the speakers and the headphone jack (the one reason why I got it, to replace and sell my music player) left much to be desired.

    It’s not like Apple is providing much of an improvement on the hardware either. I know people say the 64 bit processor is impressive, and that the ‘s’ revision is never as progressive as the number revision, but given what the competition is pumping out, I’m amazed at how minimal the hardware improvements are.

    In short, I don’t like iOS 7 as much as I’d want, my iPhone 5 is starting to show its age, and it’s a hell of a job to try and find a good upgrade path from here (I’m picky apparently)

      • quasi_accurate
      • 6 years ago

      Have you read Anand’s 5s review?

      [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/7335/the-iphone-5s-review[/url<] "At the end of the day, if you prefer iOS for your smartphone - the iPhone 5s won't disappoint. In many ways it's an evolutionary improvement over the iPhone 5, but in others it is a significant step forward. What Apple's silicon teams have been doing for these past couple of years has really started to pay off. [b<]From a CPU and GPU standpoint, the 5s is probably the most futureproof of any iPhone ever launched.[/b<] As much as it pains me to use the word futureproof, if you are one of those people who likes to hold onto their device for a while - the 5s is as good a starting point as any."

      • MadManOriginal
      • 6 years ago

      In Soviet Apple ecosystem, upgrade path finds you!

    • Helmore
    • 6 years ago

    What iPhone and iPad have you used iOS on? Just curious.

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      iPhone 5 and iPad 4.

        • tipoo
        • 6 years ago

        Both have the Swift CPU cores and better graphics than my Mini. The thing is nearly new, and iOS7 already seems to bog it down. It’s nothing like 5 on the first iPad or 4 on the 3G etc, but everything seems to take a few fractions of a second longer for it to react to.

    • Decelerate
    • 6 years ago

    No one there to tell them that sometimes [b<][i<]This is sh*t[/i<][/b<], which was Apple's greatest competitive advantage imo. Edit X: the sh*t word breaks formatting...

    • pepys
    • 6 years ago

    You know why iHate it? I’m old and my eye sight is terrible close up, the old iOS fonts were a bit easier to make out, now the font type is hair thin, now I have to wear reading glasses just to fiddle with it.

      • quasi_accurate
      • 6 years ago

      You can turn on bold text in the accessibility settings. That’ll make it easier to read.

        • pepys
        • 6 years ago

        Thank you very much!

    • BabyFaceLee
    • 6 years ago

    I rather like the new flatter, brighter look but I can see what others are saying about it not being as ‘charismatic’ or elegant. To my mind it’s much more suited to the new 5C iphones which are more cute, funky and colourful by design. iOS 7 doesn’t sit quite so well with the 5S models which are more sophisticated and elegant.

    As for my iPad 4, well after changing my wallpaper to a picture of a large colourful air balloon (i.e. almost identical to the stock wallpaper of the Samsung S4!) it looks more at home than my high def view of Scotland’s mountains.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 6 years ago

    Wish you kept that s4 note don’t you Cyril? :p

    It’s like they took the “unfinished” feel of Maps and put it everywhere.

    • Spunjji
    • 6 years ago

    I’m slightly astonished by the use of such garish colours. It makes Android look positively moderate by comparison, but not in a good way.

    • vargis14
    • 6 years ago

    I do not mind the new look on my iphone5 , But I hate that they removed the clear conversation button in messaging. Now you have to remove the whole contact from your texting list instead of being able to just clear the conversation from the contact you are messaging. Very annoying not being able to have your contacts you text often ready to go with a empty conversation window.

      • ColeLT1
      • 6 years ago

      Double tap (or hold) one of the conversation balloons, hit more, then it works just like edit, you have the dots to turn red and can select/delete.

    • shaurz
    • 6 years ago

    Yes they definitely went overboard with the flat design fad. It works better on Android because most of the interface is black, but it doesn’t work so well in white, and Android does seem to have more contrast and hint of depth. When my Mum upgraded her iPhone to iOS 7 she said it doesn’t look classy any more. My sis seems to love it though. Steve Jobs would never have approved this, I’m sure!

    • JohnC
    • 6 years ago

    I agree. I upgraded my own iPad and my spare iPhone4S and I wish I hasn’t. Everything is too bright and lacks the contrast (especially the address area in mobile Safari and the keyboard) and the icon design is a fucking joke (especially the Gamecenter, Photos and Newsstand icons). They finally made the Clock shortcut into a working widget but it is still useless with its tiny fixed size and still totally redundant – I can already see time on top status bar… Amusingly the Weather shortcut is still as useless as ever (still not an active widget).

    When I showed the new update to my parents (who also currently use similar devices) they just asked me to never upgrade theirs (especially my stepfather who has vision problems).

    • sschaem
    • 6 years ago

    I’m in the camp that did’t find io6 elegant, ‘magnetic’ or even interesting to look at.
    Its really just a grid of icons + some sliding menu page for settings.

    And ios6 / ios7 side by side look very, very similar
    [url<]http://osxdaily.com/2013/06/11/ios-7-vs-ios-6-visual-comparison/[/url<] To me ios7 look the same but cleaned up. More clarity & functional at screen real estate, more consistency. But I have to agree, the 'old charm' is gone with the 7 update.

    • espetado
    • 6 years ago

    Well, this blogpost reflects my opinion as well.
    I had the chance to test all kinds of phones for weeks (the wife also has a Galaxy s4) and if there is one thing I don’t like it’s the colorfullness of non-iphones. The pc-look, the Android-ness, the ‘we didn’t think well enough about our OS’ thing, ..
    The iOS always looked nicer to me in the way you described. Now, that part is gone. It’s just starting to look like all the other phones. A disappointment indeed.
    Still, I would pick an iphone over any other but it’s baffling why they chose the ugly colors. Just take a good look at the screens posted here. Ugh..

    • sonofsanta
    • 6 years ago

    It looks like there’s a lot of rough edges still to be smoothed down: [url<]http://sloppyui.tumblr.com/[/url<] It's not like Apple to release something any less than totally polished. Two years since Jobs' passing, perhaps this is the first true post-Jobs release, the first to have begun life after his time. It tells.

      • Forge
      • 6 years ago

      Jesus. I think it was exactly this class of thing that used to make S. Jobs lose his sh*t. Apparently no one else at Apple is up to losing their sh*t anymore. They’d rather release it as an update instead.

      Ohhh, that’s my new euphemism. I’ll be up for dinner in a little bit, I have to go release some updates first!

      • NeelyCam
      • 6 years ago

      Damn, some of those are really awful..

    • Pax-UX
    • 6 years ago

    My eyes they’re BURNING!!! so may bright colours, I just want it in black!

      • rbattle
      • 6 years ago

      You can invert colors in accessibility. If you pick the right background, it looks like classic TR colors.

        • LukeCWM
        • 6 years ago

        I think he means the iPhone 5C, not iOS 7.

          • rbattle
          • 6 years ago

          I see, it seems you are right. Just get the space grey 5s? It is pretty close to black but shouldn’t show scratches and grime as much.

    • trackerben
    • 6 years ago

    I’m just guessing here , but maybe you feel that way because the icon tray’s gone. There’s no “bottom” to things on screen, there’s little metaphorical heft or depth. Psychologically it all seems to be just “hanging there” on a pane.

    Like a traditonal Windows pane, and we know how flat that can feel.

      • Wirko
      • 6 years ago

      User interfaces of yesteryear were designed so that parts of screen that serve different functions also have a clear visual distinction between them. We’re getting less and less of this with every new version of iOS, Android and Windows. This is bad for usability, and it can’t be called elegant either.

    • RhysAndrews
    • 6 years ago

    Each to their own, because iOS 7 gave me a renewed sense of magnetism towards my phone 🙂 I love it, it’s fresh. It feels like what my iPhone 5 should have felt like when I first got it.

    But you’re not wrong about the contrast and icon issues. They have definitely over-simplified in some areas.

    • Xenolith
    • 6 years ago

    There’s no innovation here, just a change in the look and feel. The first OS to break away from the launcher screen, will be the true innovator.

      • Wirko
      • 6 years ago

      I’d be lost without a launcher screen. Are we supposed to control our phones by
      (a) command line
      (b) whistling Morse code
      (c) speech
      (d) eye movements
      (e) thought
      ?

        • derFunkenstein
        • 6 years ago

        Gestures.

        * Look off to the side and scratch your head (launch browser)
        * Rub your eyes (call in sick to work)
        * Pat your head and rub your belly simultaneously (order a pizza)
        * Rub your belly and pat your head at the same time (book that trip to Vegas)
        * Yawn (lock the phone, put it in night time DND mode)

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 6 years ago

      Blackberry? Isn’t that what the Z10 was supposed to bring to the table?

      • End User
      • 6 years ago

      I could never go back to iOS 6.

        • Forge
        • 6 years ago

        Correct. Apple will not let you. You can’t downgrade iDevices.

          • End User
          • 6 years ago

          Sure you can. Grab the .ipsw file and away you go.

      • chµck
      • 6 years ago

      Jolla?

      • MadManOriginal
      • 6 years ago

      You just called WP7 the true innovator.

    • jss21382
    • 6 years ago

    I tend to agree, I’ve been using it for about a month, it’s an upgrade from 6, but, it definitely leaves you feeling unfulfilled.

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