My Steelcase Leap chair fixed my crappy posture

I do a lot of sitting.

Like, a lot. I sit in my home office for eight to nine hours every day doing TR-related work. Once I’m done, I go on sitting there doing other things—working on personal projects, playing Trackmania, wasting my time on Reddit, and so forth.

I take breaks, of course. Every now and then, I’ll walk to the kitchen, open the fridge door, decide that I’m not hungry, and walk back to my desk. If it’s not raining, I’ll go outside for a walk. Even if it is raining, I may venture out into the city to run errands.

But, yeah, I mostly sit. That’s why, nearly six years ago, I paid an almost outrageous sum of money for a fancy ergonomic chair.

The Herman Miller Mirra served me well. It encouraged me to sit properly, and even when I slouched, it was far more comfortable and supportive than the cheap office chairs I’d sat in before. I could get the lumbar support and seat depth just so, and I could make the chair lean forward when I needed. And, heck, the thing looked plain cool, like something out of Star Trek. I was delighted.

Well, at least at first. A couple of years ago, I started noticing some tingling in my right pinky and ring fingers. I blamed my mouse initially, and when changing mice didn’t help, I fiddled with the armrests and tried to use my left hand to mouse for a while. Some of those things helped. I got better, then worse, then better, then worse again. Finally, last winter, I got some x-rays done and went to see a physiotherapist. I was told that my upper back and neck were the problem. In short, it was a posture issue. I started going to the gym, doing stretches, and watching my posture more closely.

But it wasn’t just me showing signs of wear. Over the years, the curve of the Mirra’s back had flattened somewhat, and the lumbar support had lost much of its rigidity. The other day, I tried sitting in my girlfriend’s cheap Ikea chair for a few days. And guess what? The tingling in my fingers got better.

In the end, I decided to call my local Herman Miller distributor and get the Mirra serviced—then to sell it and buy another, better chair.

I settled on the Steelcase Leap. The Leap is a favorite among many, and some, like the folks at TheWireCutter, recommend it over the venerable Aeron as well as Herman Miller’s new flagship, the Embody. The Wall Street Journal called the original version of the Leap “Best Overall” in 2005. I ordered the V2 model, which has softer arm rests, a taller back, and other design tweaks. It set me back $755 before tax, which is a lot, but not that much for something in which I spend most of my waking hours.

On October 4, the Leap showed up at my door. Here’s what I typed in our staff IRC channel immediately after sitting in it and making the requisite adjustments:

[9:51:17 AM] wow, this steelcase chair… instant relief

The Leap looks pretty unimpressive next to its Herman Miller counterparts. It has padded cushions instead of fancy mesh materials, and there’s a lot of plastic covering things up. Steelcase has put an adjustment guide under each arm rest, too, and it has labeled the adjustment knobs with both printed text and Braille. Looking at this thing, you get the sense the Leap was designed to populate boring offices filled with normal people—not European design studios rife with iMacs and glass-top desks. If Herman Miller can be accused of favoring form over function, Steelcase is the polar opposite.

Yet, as boring as it looks, the Leap is just as adjustable as the Mirra—and, more importantly for my needs, its back has a much more pronounced curve with some much-needed padding. Adjusted properly, the Leap almost punishes me for not sitting up straight. Even brand new, the Mirra only ever encouraged good posture, and it never insisted too terribly much.

The Leap made my back better instantly, but it took me over a week to get really used to the thing. See, the Mirra has a flexible mesh seat, kind of like a hammock, that molds itself to the shape of your butt. The sides and front of the chair are rock-hard, but the part where your butt hangs is very soft. The Leap is the other way around. The front edge never cuts off circulation to your legs, and the sides are soft, but the part where your butt goes is quite firm. There’s a couple inches of padding and a hard surface underneath, and that’s it.

This is a deliberate design choice on Steelcase’s part. Here’s what the company says about it:

Does a thicker seat cushion mean a chair is more comfortable?

Not necessarily, some chairs have thicker foam that may feel softer initially, but will lead to user discomfort after an hour or two of sustained sitting since thicker foam typically provides little ergonomic support. This is not good for the life of the chair or the long-term comfort of the user. In essence, foam that feels great initially does not always translate into long-term seated comfort.

Steelcase also badmouths mesh seat designs like the Mirra’s. It claims they restrict user movement and cause discomfort when your body touches the hard frame supporting the mesh. “Moreover,” it adds, “the side forces that are felt when you push down on mesh will have a tendency to ‘squeeze’ you into the chair, resulting in uneven pressure distribution.”

I don’t know about that; the Mirra’s seat was pretty comfortable. The Leap, on the other hand, is literally a pain in the butt unless it’s adjusted just so. Seriously, it’s very unforgiving.

However, now that I’ve found the correct seat depth, lumbar height, and back tension to accommodate my flabby body, the butt soreness has given way to a feeling of firm support. The firmness keeps me alert and aware of my posture—and every now and then, it encourages me to change position or to get up and walk around, which is what you’re supposed to do. The back isn’t cold and hard like the Mirra’s, but it’s just as punishing as the seat if you slouch. When I get up at the end of the day, my back is still curved, and the whole middle third of my body is a little sore—but in a good way, like after a visit to the gym.

More to the point, the Leap helps to keep my ulnar nerve from getting pinched. Even after a long day of typing, benchmarking, and Excel jockeying, I feel little to no tingling in my fingers. And now, sitting in other chairs—even the Mirra—brings back the symptoms in a hurry.

So, yeah. Good job, Steelcase. You made me super uncomfortable for a week or so, but it was worth it.

Comments closed
    • ReefGeek
    • 6 years ago

    This is a post that gives me hope.

    Hello,
    Can you please give me a few tips for finding correct setting? I have read the manual, but I do not know from where to begin. Which settings do you currently use? In what order did you start adjusting?

    I just bought Steelcase Leap two days ago and I have the same problem, in the same area…
    This seat is simply amazing for my wrists, hopefully, I will be as happy as you.

    Thank you very much.

    • swampfox
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Every now and then, I'll walk to the kitchen, open the fridge door, decide that I'm not hungry, and walk back to my desk.[/quote<] I do this all the time! And by the way, thanks for doing an update on the office chair. I read your review of the Herman Miller a long time ago, and have recently been considering getting a nicer office chair, which led me to wonder how you were liking it after years of us. This is great timing!

    • BoneDude
    • 6 years ago

    I see a lot of comments by people using standing desks and telling how their back pain has gone away. Since I suffer from serious back pain I’m considering buying one but the only one I know of is the Galant from IKEA and I’m not so sure about it’s quality and the amount of adjustment that can be made. Are there any other good options in Europe or is the Galant the one I’ll have to settle for?

    • thesmileman
    • 6 years ago

    I just got an UpDesk electonic sit stand desk and I’m really glad I did. I love great chairs even expensive ones but a sit stand desk has done wonders for me

    • anotherengineer
    • 6 years ago

    “My Steelcase Leap chair fixed my crappy posture”

    Like this?
    [url<]http://images2.fanpop.com/images/photos/5900000/Gollum-smeagol-gollum-5977043-1024-768.jpg[/url<]

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      How did you find that picture of me?

        • tipoo
        • 6 years ago

        It was top post on gonewild.

    • Great_Big_Abyss
    • 6 years ago

    I like your monitor stands. I have an MKII 750W running my main rig as we speak… Great powersupply, I just wish it was modular!

    • B.A.Frayd
    • 6 years ago

    Do yourself another favor Cyril. Drop your monitors down off those makeshift stands. Your eyes should be equal to the top 1/4 of the screen when you look straight ahead.

      • defacer
      • 6 years ago

      That’s why one uses stands like that (I do too) — to compensate for a display that would otherwise be way too low.

        • Cyril
        • 6 years ago

        Yep. The monitors are just the right height like this—top third or so at eye level. If I put them down on the desk, I have to tilt my head down, which aggravates my back/nerve problems.

      • Luminair
      • 6 years ago

      The monitor height is an important part of this story! He is sitting straight, his head up… and that is taller than a normal monitor stand on a normal desk will go!

    • indeego
    • 6 years ago

    Like a few other posters, I’ve been using a standing desk for two years, and my lower back pain that I used to get 1-4 times a year is gone. One time I was exhausted, and reverted back to a chair, and my back pain returned with a fury.

    I’ll likely never sit at a desk again.

      • entropy13
      • 6 years ago

      Sit at a…desk?

        • indeego
        • 6 years ago

        y….es?

    • cldmstrsn
    • 6 years ago

    I have to say, if you want really good posture and to not die when you are 55 you should really look into a standing desk. I sit a ton because I also love to play video games in my free time but ever since I got a standing desk I have lost 15 pounds and I no longer have lower back pain. Here is a link to a great article about how sitting just drains our bodies. Hope you look at it and find it interesting! [url<]http://unofficialnetworks.com/npr-story-sitting-killing-stretching-useless-running-doubles-memory-walking-prolongs-life-95848/[/url<]

    • DrD
    • 6 years ago

    [url<]http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/23/health/personal-health-disorder-makes-hunger-a-constant-companion.html?pagewanted=2&src=pm[/url<] Prader-Willi syndrome. Some years ago I suggested an article about good desks and chairs.

    • itachi
    • 6 years ago

    Me needs to find a job and get one of these !

    • NovusBogus
    • 6 years ago

    I tried out a Leap at a used office supply place not too long ago, it’s an excellent chair and costs slightly less than an Aeron. I’m eventually going to get one of the two at work, and used Leaps are cheap enough that I might get one for home too.

    • glacius555
    • 6 years ago

    I had the same itch, brewing for two years.

    Then, I bought an Ikea office chair for roughly $200 and decided to spend $800 on a table with elevation whenever it is possible. I am becoming more and more happy to work standing up..

    • Igor_Kavinski
    • 6 years ago

    Cyril, you need to get up from your seat every half an hour or so and do some light exercise like jumping or skipping rope. This is very necessary for your bone health. Otherwise your bone density might decrease, putting pressure on your nerves and giving rise to really uncomfortable pain in your limbs. Be sure to take some bone health supplement that contains calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K2, boron, magnesium and manganese.

      • itachi
      • 6 years ago

      wow you are so right, i recently “cracked” one of my rib … (by doing some exercise I believe) that stuff is so painful!! and I been since so long sitting in my desk and never doing breaks, or not nearly enough exercise ! crazy you’re so right … everyone who reads this believe me, what Igor says is 100% true cause I didnt even fell or had an accident, I did a little weights, and bit of punching ball, and one of my rib got owned.

    • TheCollective
    • 6 years ago

    I have sat in many ergonomic chairs, including my previous favorite, the Herman Miller Aeron. This one beats it, hands down. I sit in this at my office every day for this past 5 years and for the foreseeable future. Get one. you won’t regret it.

    • SoundChaos
    • 6 years ago

    My call center workplace also uses these chairs… Up until reading this article, I was planning on buying one myself, because they are absolutely amazing. I figured they would be in the $80-150 range, since my office has over 800 of them, and they seem to skimp on the quality of everything else. I never imagined they cost so much.. I’ts pretty devistating to know I will never be able to afford one 🙁

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      You can find refurbs for much less. A friend of mine got a V1 model on Craigslist for $200.

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      Office furniture is actually one place that companies typically [i<]don't[/i<] skimp on, at least in my experience. My guess is that they expect to use it for decades, so they'll invest on the front end and never replace any of it. On a less cynical note, chairs make sense to spend a lot on because they are used for 8+ hours a day.

    • holophrastic
    • 6 years ago

    I’m in the same boat in terms of hours of sitting. But I went a very different way.
    [url<]http://www.globaltotaloffice.com/gu_2012/control.php?record_id=310[/url<] I bought a chair designed for sitting. It's been over 12 years, and I sit on my back. Chair fully reclined (as far as desk chairs can), and an ottoman for my feet (at the wall behind the desk). The result is that I sit in a "v" shape, with my butt low, my feet high, and as much weight on my back as on my butt. My shoulders back, my neck "forward" (at thing angle, forward is actually up). The overall result is to use all of the primary muscles, and none of the secondary muscles. So it's the front of my neck, not the back. It's my abs not my back, it's the palm of my wrists not the back of my wrists. I won't go back to sitting upright ever again.

      • Rectal Prolapse
      • 6 years ago

      I completely agree. 90% of my back pain went away when my sitting was adjusted to this (the rest of the pain is when I forget to stand up every 30 minutes):

      [url<]http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6187080.stm[/url<] IMHO, chairs that "improve posture" are one of the worst things you can do for your back, especially the long term. Also, look at pictures of jet fighter chairs - looks like the air force already discovered the 135 degree sitting position independently of the article above.

        • house
        • 6 years ago

        The Leap back angle reclines to 120 degrees, exactly what the article recommends in the final paragraph. Notice on the leap, the seating surface shifts forward when you recline; this relieves forward pressure during reclining as well as further increasing the pivot angle while keeping you feet on the floor,like the study diagram illustrates. The leap seems like a dead ringer for what the BBC article recommends. Another great thing about the chair is that it doesn’t force you into any specific posture it allows you easily transition to numerous comfortable postures. Variation is the key.

        • humannn
        • 6 years ago

        The article you linked said nothing about what happens to the neck in a 135 degree sitting angle. I find that angle most comfortable for my back, but it usually hurts my neck after a while, and I’m forced to change positions.

          • Rectal Prolapse
          • 6 years ago

          Having a good neck support is needed for that position – I don’t know if the Leap has a head rest you can add.

          My chair reclines and moves forward – it is leather and has lots of padding. In fact, it’s my home theater sofa! I wheel away my desk when I want to watch a movie on my projection screen.

          I have an ergotron monitor arm that I adjust specifically to avoid the neck issue you describe. It’s pretty easy!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 6 years ago

    I’m just marveling at desk chair prices right now. I have a $150 chair from Staples that’s roughly 7 years old.

    • Chrispy_
    • 6 years ago

    +1 for blog post.

    Seriously, you only get one set of bones or joints in life. Don’t ruin them with $100 chairs if you’re going to spend eight hours a day sitting on one.

    Same for screens, keyboards and desks. Damnit people – you’ll spend $50K on a car for three years but you won’t spend $2K on an ergonimic setup that’ll last you a decade or more?

      • NeelyCam
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]Damnit people - you'll spend $50K on a car for three years[/quote<] Not everybody is in the top 10%. Some people spend less than $50k on a car, and/or use it longer than three years.

        • indeego
        • 6 years ago

        I gave my car to my ex. I hope to never own one again for the rest of my life.

      • Prion
      • 6 years ago

      I paid $300 for a Nissan D21 pickup (and then threw another ~$500 into it) and I’ve had it for over 5 years now, runs like a champ, bench seat is probably completely unergonomical.

      Wait what was the question again?

    • mesyn191
    • 6 years ago

    We have a bunch of these chairs at work, no one likes them.

    Oh they’re certainly well made and about as adjustable as you could want too. I do like those super adjustable armrests quite a bit actually.

    Overall though they aren’t worth the money and aren’t all that comfortable to sit in for 9-12hr a day. The older chairs we got rid of were torn up but far more comfortable, and importantly, also had a head/neck support. The Leap doesn’t and suddenly most everyone at the office has been getting back and neck pain. Not to mention your tail bone starts to hurt after sitting in one that long. Everyone gets up every other hour or so now for a while otherwise they go nuts.

    Unfortunately we’re stuck with these things for a while due to budget issues though. The old chairs already got tossed. You’d think for $700+ the damn things would come a bit more padding and head/neck support but apparently those things are “ergonomic enough”.

    At my house I use an Alera Wrigley Pro office chair, which is a Chinese manufacturer, that I got off Amazon for about $190 on sale and that thing is almost as adjustable (arm rests aren’t as good), almost as well built, and far more comfortable then the Leap. Already told the boss about it and hopefully we’ll be getting something similar to that and getting rid of these overpriced Steelcase crap chairs.

      • itachi
      • 6 years ago

      Damn, I thought it was the real deal and then you tell us it’s crap :O

        • mesyn191
        • 6 years ago

        Go to a store that has these and other similar high end chairs and physically sit in one for a while.

        Spend at least 30 minutes in one and get a feel for how it “breaks in” for you. That is the only way you’ll know if a chair is the right one for you.

        FWIW I’ve also had the chance to test drive a Aeron and Embody. Both were well made and comfortable but the price…I just can’t bring myself to spend that much on a good office chair. The one I mentioned tends to go for $4-500 but also goes on sale every month or so for around $200 on Amazon. That is how I got such a good price.

        If you find you love the feel of any of these high end chairs but also can’t stomach the price go look up them on Craigslist. So long as you live in or near a major city they tend to pop up often and are usually in good shape even after several years of wear.

      • Deo Domuique
      • 6 years ago

      That’s exactly the case… I paid 280€ for my chair just because it looks impressive, it’s enormous size, and of course I tried it for a few secs… But that was my mistake. “A few seconds” trying without thinking many parameters that I should, and voila…

      Most of these chairs, and especially the bigger ones like mine, are fine if you sit comfortably back to watch a movie or something. For instance, I never use the armrests and my back rarely touches the shank of the chair. I mean, what’s the point?

      I don’t know what chair they have to desing in order to meet all of my requirements, but my next chair is gonna come after a lot of study before I pay.

    • MoveMoreToday
    • 6 years ago
      • kuraegomon
      • 6 years ago

      The message isn’t horrible, but your tactics sure are. Can someone block the spammer, please?

        • auxy
        • 6 years ago

        To be fair, while this person’s message does exist solely to send links to their site, they [b<]are[/b<] A) ontopic and B) pretty upfront about it. Besides, they only made one post; can we really call that "spamming"? ヽ(´ー`)┌

          • Flying Fox
          • 6 years ago

          That’s the smart thing about some spammer/spambot these days: their posts will seem on topic and legit at first glance. However, if you read deeper into them, most if not all of them are just repeating what was just said or make no sense at all.

          In other words they add nothing to the conversation and is a thinly veiled attempt in selling/pushing whatever they are paid to spam. Sometimes it may even be a delay reaction in which the spam comes later.

          In the end, spam is spam.

    • ermo
    • 6 years ago

    Cyril,

    Have you considered getting a (walking) treadmill and a height-adjustable desk?

    You’ll get plenty of excercise that way while you’re working. And your flab will go away without you even noticing it.

    A friend of mine swears by it. In fact, come to think of it, I might just begin saving up for an adjustable desk and a treadmill myself. And a chair similar to the one you just reviewed.

    • house
    • 6 years ago

    Our Leap is over 10 yrs old and still going strong. The Aeron is more comfortable but the Leap’s superior adjustability and posture support make up for it. For cubital tunnel syndrome, believe it or not wearing soft elbow pads backwards for a few weeks while sleeping can fix it. People often sleep with their arms bent, which compresses the nerve for several hours each night. The pads help keep your arms straight, relieving the compression. Our patients have had great luck with this, wrapping the elbow with a towel at night works as well.

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      Oh, I tried all of that. My nerve entrapment isn’t happening at the elbow; it’s at the neck. Sitting up straight and keeping my chin up does the trick for the most part.

    • tipoo
    • 6 years ago

    I replaced my desk chair with an exercise ball because I’m crazy. Short term, ouchie. Long term, strong back and core and no lower back pain.

    I also probably stand more than I sit. I’m just crazy like that too. I’ll even stand and walk around while eating meals.

    • gerryg
    • 6 years ago

    If you’re willing to spend that much on a chair, and are concerned about health, try buying or building a sit/stand workstation.

    [url<]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24532996[/url<]

    • Zyphos
    • 6 years ago

    We have Leaps at work. Long before that I had a Leap at home. Now the girlfriend has a Leap as well. The chair is worth it.

      • bigbridge
      • 6 years ago

      I got mine in late 90’s and have never regretted it – what helped sell me is that it is also available in a Large model that is plenty wide for really big people. I was 6-2 and 265 at the time, and it was really too wide for me, although it took awhile for me to realize it. Also has an extensive choice of seat and back fabrics which I liked.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Every now and then, I'll walk to the kitchen, open the fridge door, decide that I'm not hungry, and walk back to my desk.[/quote<] So happy to hear I'm not the only one who does this. My wife is like "wtf are you doing?"

    • Wirko
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]decide that I'm not hungry[/quote<] HOW DO YOU DO THAT?

      • auxy
      • 6 years ago

      Very easily! Distract yourself.

      Due to a physiological condition I have, my body thinks I am literally always starving, so I always feel hungry all the time, even after gorging myself. So I have had to teach myself how to control my eating.

      Early last year my overeating caught up with me and I managed to rip a hole in my duodenum, which got infected. Long story short: control your eating.

        • Meadows
        • 6 years ago

        Not everyone is sick by default.

          • Sabresiberian
          • 6 years ago

          If you are hungry all the time, you have a psychological or physiological disorder, or both, or a very bad diet.

          That being said, it is not “very easy” for most people to distract themselves enough to avoid eating consistently. I suspect that auxy’s problem is psychological, or mostly so, not physiological, and the scare of his life-threatening incident gave him the impetuous he needed to overcome his habit of eating too much. Otherwise he wouldn’t say it is “very easy”.

          Going to the fridge to look for food when you aren’t hungry is usually done out of boredom more than anything else. It can also be caused by a (usually subconscious) desire to avoid something you think of as unpleasant. There are other possibilities; the thing to do is ask yourself why you went to the fridge when you weren’t hungry – you will likely hear an answer that makes sense to you once you have thought about it in this way.

            • auxy
            • 6 years ago

            How rude and presumptuous. I [b<]literally[/b<] said it was a physiological condition, diagnosed over a long term (i.e. my entire life) by my physician. You should really revise your attitude.

            • Diplomacy42
            • 6 years ago

            “pick your specialist, pick your diagnosis”
            -house

          • auxy
          • 6 years ago

          Did I somehow say or imply that?

          The point is, it IS possible to control your appetite through psychological means, rather than pharmaceutical, alternative intake, or similar physical means.

          You’re a jerk, Meadows. ヽ(`Д´#)ノ

      • Meadows
      • 6 years ago

      Drink more.

      Drinking not only suppresses regular hunger; I’ve read in a health magazine that in most cases, “slight thirst” is misinterpreted as “slight hunger” by people, making them habitually reach for the fridge instead of a glass of water.

      By thinking the other way around, you can separate real hunger from illusions and also maintain proper hydration for office work (mental work).

        • tipoo
        • 6 years ago

        [quote<]Drink more.[/quote<] Great, but now I'm drunk!

      • NeelyCam
      • 6 years ago

      Have coffee.

    • boskone
    • 6 years ago

    At home I’ve switched to a standing desk, to excellent effect.

    My cube at work, on the other hand, is the complete opposite. Like (I suspect) most cubes, it’s utterly impossible to get it ergonomically correct, and the chairs are pretty meh. (I tried to get cubes that are readily used for standing, but as it didn’t effect my boss he didn’t bother.)

    • nswenson
    • 6 years ago

    I love my leap. I bought a v2 used on ebay for $350. I’ve been using it for almost a year and my back feels so much better. Best thing I have ever done for my back.

    • End User
    • 6 years ago

    A good chair is worth its weight in gold. I love my Herman Miller Embody.

    • quasi_accurate
    • 6 years ago

    Very nice! I’m looking into getting the Leap myself. Where did you buy yours from?

      • Cyril
      • 6 years ago

      This local reseller here in Vancouver: [url<]http://www.heritageoffice.com/[/url<] They were able to deliver it for $20, which was handy, since I don't have a car. 🙂

      • drfish
      • 6 years ago

      Here’s one option. [url<]http://www.newchairparts.com/[/url<] That's the place I got mine from but I snag them before they cleared them out of the building.

    • drfish
    • 6 years ago

    I can vouch for the Leap! A few weeks ago I had the unique opportunity to raid the [url=https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=steelcase%20pyramid&gbv=2&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi<]Steelcase Pyramid[/url<] and get some cheap furniture for work and home. I bought Leaps for myself and Mrs. Fish for $225 each. I also got a sweet powered corner desk. [url=http://dr_fish.speedymail.org/techreport/WP_20130913_005.jpg]Here's my setup.[/url]. It is my very favorite chair. [i<]Edit: Ugh, stupid URL... Anyway, I forgot to mention that I have an Embody at work and while its nice I think the Leap kicks its butt. I have a couple Aerons in the basement as well but was never impressed by them. Before you ask, I live near Grand Rapids and know a few people in the industry.[/i<]

      • auxy
      • 6 years ago

      Enclose the URL in quotes. That should work. [url=http://i.imgur.com/C0HUdGX.gif<]Like this.[/url<] (Picture is of me, all too often.) (edit: or not. I did URLs in comments the other day, though...) (edit2: Oh, it doesn't need quotes. I don't know why yours is not working then. Maybe it hates underscores?)

        • drfish
        • 6 years ago

        Yeah, I think we figured out the comments system didn’t like underscores before… Ahh well, there’s always copy/paste.

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