Google, I love you, but you’re bringing me down

I was listening to LCD Soundsystem the other day, and New York, I love you, but you’re bringing me down somehow coalesced my feelings on Google’s recent behavior. Dunno what happened there, but being well into a growler of Tofino Brewing’s Hoppin Cretin IPA might have contributed. In any case, I’ll take inspiration where I can get it.

Google, you’re perfect, please don’t change a thing.

If it weren’t for you, we might have to use Bing.

Gmail captured my heart, and Android played a part.

If only I could, I would give you a ring.

I love Google. I really do. Its search engine has been a vital part of my Internet experience for what feels like forever. As far as I can tell, Google search remains the best way to find information on the web, especially since it’s started spitting out knowledge along with links to third-party content.

Then there’s Gmail, the slickest free webmail solution around. Gmail has been boss since back when it was an exclusive, invite-only club. I use it constantly for my personal and work correspondence on every computing device I own.

Android is my preferred platform for mobile devices. To me, it feels much more like a real operating system than iOS. I’ll take basic freedoms like file management over the tightly controlled Apple experience any day. Android had some rough edges in its infancy, but it’s improved dramatically over the past couple of years thanks to sensible optimizations and thoughtful updates. Speaking of which…

Google, I love you, but you’re bringing me down.

I thought we were close, but that’s all turned around.

Your KitKat may be sweet, still I fear we’ll never meet.

Turns out my Nexus is too old for this round.

In the time that I’ve owned it, my Galaxy Nexus smartphone has become a faster, more capable device thanks to new Android releases. Google Now integration, combined with speech recognition for search, has made it much easier to get the information I want quickly and easily. Smaller tweaks have been welcomed, too, but Android 4.1’s "Project Butter" optimizations take the cake. They made the whole UI much smoother and more responsive.

You can imagine my delight when Google revealed that Android 4.4 KitKat includes "Project Svelte" enhancements aimed at more efficient memory usage. The latest version of the OS is designed to improve performance on devices with as little as 512MB of RAM and to speed up multitasking for all. Such an update seems perfectly suited to the two-year-old Nexus. Google doesn’t agree, however. Its KitKat FAQ says the Galaxy "falls outside of the 18-month update window when Google and others traditionally update devices."

What’s the point of optimizing Android for less potent hardware if you’re not going to bring older, less potent devices along for the ride? Cheaper handsets like the Moto G, probably. And wearables, I suspect.

As Google points out, its 18-month upgrade window is typical for the industry. And that’s the problem. Google wasn’t supposed to be like the others; it was supposed to be better. Nexus devices don’t look quite as sweet when their ticket to OS updates expires 18 months after introduction. At least the ROM community might be able to pick up the slack.

Google, you’re awesome, but you’re cramping my style.

Your SD aversion has irked me for a while.

The Nexus 5 looks legit, and part of me lusts for it.

But 32 gigs are too few for my files.

Even with a limited OS upgrade path, Nexus devices are still pretty sweet. If only Google weren’t allergic to equipping them with expandable storage. The official line is that Google wants to unify storage on a single volume. There are benefits to that approach, and the internal storage should be faster than the microSD alternative. However, Google has been negligent on the other side of the equation. All of its current Nexus devices top out at a measly 32GB. Meanwhile, the latest Apple devices are available with up to 64GB and in some cases 128GB of flash.

Flash chips have become smaller and prices have plummeted in recent years, so there’s no excuse for skimping. Apps are only getting larger, especially games designed to take advantage of the latest hardware. Modern camera sensors pack ever more megapixels, expanding the footprint of the pictures we take and the videos we record. Meanwhile, high-PPI displays encourage us to consume media with the highest fidelity—and corresponding file size.

Cloud storage is supposed to bridge the gap, but that’s an ugly compromise for all kinds of reasons. What if you have a limited data cap or a slow connection? What if you don’t want your data floating around in the ether, where the NSA and others might be able to find out about your Nickelback bootleg collection? Being limited to 32GB of local storage is potentially crippling for both power users and folks with extensive media libraries.

Google, I love you, but you’re bringing me down.

You’ve taken this smilie, turned it to a frown.

Maps that guided my life are now the cause of much strife.

What ever happened to holding my hand out of town?

Google Maps is in a class of its own. For some reason, though, Google seems intent on neutering the Android app. First, it obfuscated the process of caching maps locally, an essential feature for travelers who don’t want to pay exorbitant roaming fees. Then, it removed My Maps functionality entirely, preventing carefully crafted maps from being accessed on mobile devices.

The Maps app has undergone some questionable UI changes, as well, although I’m not nearly as irate about those tweaks some of the recent reviews on Google Play. The lost functionality bothers me the most, in part because it makes me reluctant to depend on anything Google makes.

Google, you give and then you take away.

Yet it’s hard to complain because I never pay.

Reader may be the worst, but it wasn’t the first.

Why get attached if I don’t know if you’ll stay?

I never really got into Google Reader. When it was shuttered this summer, my life was largely unaffected. But I felt for the folks who had come to rely on the service to digest all of their feeds. Google gave them something they loved and then took it away.

iGoogle didn’t stick, either, though it had a good run before being shut down at the beginning of the month. Google has ended other services, too, making me question whether one of my own favorites will be targeted in the next round of "spring cleaning." Since Google’s products tend to be free, it’s hard to complain too loudly when they’re yanked. If only that lessened the feeling of loss.

Google, come on now, you’re up in my grill.

I thought we were cool, I thought we were chill.

Now I get why there’s plus, social network’s a must.

But making me sign up… I swear I could kill.

When Google+ was introduced, I barely noticed. Everyone needed a social network because, um, Facebook, or something. Google’s approach to sharing at least seemed to be more sensible than the status quo, but I never paid too much attention, mostly because I’m just not interested in social networking. Google was OK with that, at least for a while. Lately, it’s been trying to jam Google+ down my throat.

Google+ first snuck into my life via Gmail, and it’s now infected YouTube. Pretty soon, I wonder if any of the company’s services will be accessible without a plus account. And for what? So Google can claim to have a bunch of active accounts owned by people who still prefer to hang out at Zuckerberg’s house?

I know, I know. Other companies pull this kind of crap all the time. But Google+ was supposed to be the opt-in social network, and Google was supposed to be better than all this.

And oh, just take me off your circles list.

That no one even knows exists.

No matter how much you insist.

Maybe I’m wrong. And maybe you’re right.

And maybe I’m spoiled, and this is driven by spite.

Google, I love you, but you’re bringing me down.

The little things add up, and then they start to drown.

I take all this for free, then make it about me.

But deep inside I feel like I’ve been clowned.

Comments closed
    • abdqeb
    • 6 years ago

    Google did someone unbelievable with Kit Kat. Since when has a newer OS been less resource heavy than a previous one? Does that make me greedy and want it for my older device? YES! but had it been a more resource heavy typical update, I wouldnt have complained.

    Thank you google for making a NEWER processor MORE USEFUL. I wish more OS updates actually enhanced performance, instead of impeding them.

    iOS is nice, and not nice. With the newest iOS 7, my once fast and great iPhone 4 on iOS6 is now a crashing, slow, piece of junk on iOS 7. Apple is so up tight it wont let me go back to iOS 6.

    I’m a technical person, I dont mind formating my phone, playing with roms, or what ever. Sure in 18 months I wont get the newest update, you know what, my phone is probably better without it anyway.

    • C-A_99
    • 6 years ago

    Maps caching is still there, just in a convoluted process.

    [url<]http://lifehacker.com/how-to-cache-offline-maps-in-the-new-google-maps-for-an-729295083[/url<] Basically, you move to the area to save, then search "okay maps". Doesn't seem to be a way to access the maps you've grabbed, not sure. However, it suggests that the feature may return fully in an update.

    • asdzxc57
    • 6 years ago

    Excellent as usual!

    • Laykun
    • 6 years ago

    I know you guys might not see this because it’s so late. But it seems that companies are simply un-willing to listen to consumers when it comes to technical problems. Now you guys have high speed camera equipment for latency and stutter testing, and I’d absolutely love it if you guys could do some latency side-by-side comparisons of Android Chrome with other browsers in terms of performance and input latency. A really really good comparison is on older Tegra 2 devices, a performance level that’s still quite common. People have complained about this since chrome’s release and little to nothing has been done. AMD didn’t listen when people told them their frame delivery was crap UNTIL a respected tech site stood up and actually made some noise. Give Google a kick in the pants! Bring some real numbers to the table, some empirical evidence!

    • ThorAxe
    • 6 years ago

    I left Google (Galaxy S2, Nexus S, Galaxy Nexus) for Windows Phone 8 (Lumia 920) and haven’t looked back.

    I still use a Xoom & Transformer TF300T but only if the VAIO Pro 13 isn’t available.

      • steelcity_ballin
      • 6 years ago

      Our IT staff got the same phone. It looks nice, it works, but it just has such a slim user base. I think Android is still the OS for me, it gets better all the time. I’d also be wary of every other attempts at a MS phone.

    • Xenolith
    • 6 years ago

    As far as Youtube, you don’t have to use your real name. Just create a Google+ Page with your online name, then use that for Youtube.

    • anotherengineer
    • 6 years ago

    Sign the petition then.

    [url<]http://www.change.org/petitions/google-change-the-youtube-comment-section-back-to-its-original-form[/url<]

      • jihadjoe
      • 6 years ago

      I’ve never commented on youtube, but I signed the petition because the new system took away all the trolls.

        • uni-mitation
        • 6 years ago

        Do it for the trolls!!!

        • NeelyCam
        • 6 years ago

        Good thing YGS was unaffected

    • End User
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<] I'll take basic freedoms like file management [/quote<] Examples? I ask because I have no problem connecting to my work network via VPN and transferring files back and forth between my iPad Air and SMB shares (and then launching them in various apps).

    • anubis44
    • 6 years ago

    Not to be a smartass, but I saw all of this coming from a mile away. Back when Gmail was first introduced as an invitation-only service, I decided right then and there I wasn’t going to buy in to the Google hype. I’m still glad I use a pop3 email client, so I can keep and archive my own email thank you very much. The stupidly restrictive OS policies only confirm that Google is a control freak, just like Apple. At least Microsoft lets you install Windows on any hardware you want: you can put Windows 7 on a Pentium if you want to, it’ll just run pretty slow. I also use a BlackBerry 10 rather than jumping on the iOS/Android bandwagon, and I’m very happy with my choice. I have a micro SD slot that’ll accept a 64GB cards, and I can freely move music files back and forth like a memory stick–none of this iOS nonsense having to use iTunes.

    I say if you are disappointed with Android or iOS, then vote with the most resounding voice possible: your wallet. Stop using them both. Get a BlackBerry Z30 and show Google and Apple you’re not a slave!

      • uni-mitation
      • 6 years ago

      It is just really hard to vote with your wallet when Google is flooding the market with cheap handsets and tablets. It is really hard to argue that the Moto G is not but a phone for “the masses”. What about the Android Nexus tablets? The Kindle Fire?

      So, I think the best bet for a non-betting man(such as myself) would be for things to remain as they were, and even worse, until people realize what they have given up in return for those “cheap” devices. Google’s strategy is to give you the device to break even with what they make off you with the platform. That is why they nag you to have a Google+ account, why they made the recent changes to Youtube, the recent changes to the “+” operator in searches, and so forth. Every move they make is to make money off you. Just like every company.

      btw, How is the Z30 treating you? Give me a glance of what I am missing! lol

      • sweatshopking
      • 6 years ago

      Yes, except WP.

    • Freon
    • 6 years ago

    I just enabled Google+ again for Youtube, then I start getting spam invites almost immediately. It’s not just that, but it also pops up notifications on my phone for it.

    They also discontinued iGoogle, which I used daily. At least protopage is a good alternative.

    Meanwhile, Youtube still has buffering problems, and I’ve resorted to using a downloader and pausing/resuming to fix stalls.

    Good job, Google. Good job.

      • nafhan
      • 6 years ago

      The buffering problems are pretty well documented as ISP related (if you have Verizon or one of several major cable providers).

        • Freon
        • 6 years ago

        I’ve had three different services in the last few years and Youtube was crap on all of them. AT&T DSL, then Comcast, then AT&T U-Verse. Same problems on all of them.

        If it is a problem with every ISP and Youtube, then it is a problem with Youtube, not any ISP.

          • nafhan
          • 6 years ago

          It’s a problem with a number of ISP’s, not Youtube. Google has set up CDN’s to improve performance and network usage for the ISP’s, and the ISP’s gimp the connection to Google’s CDN. You can circumvent this problem by using your firewall to block Google’s CDN. When I did that, it made Youtube work about how I would expect it to on a 50/30 connection.

          Here’s the relevant TR article:
          [url<]https://techreport.com/news/25162/report-major-isps-ruining-youtube-streaming-with-dirty-tactics[/url<]

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        i have a 50/30 fibre line and still periodically have buffering issues. might be isp, idk.

          • steelcity_ballin
          • 6 years ago

          Yea I have a 75Mb connection via FioS and Twitch.tv and youtube are nigh unusable. It’s a well-documented case of Verizon being jagoffs about their content delivery network and claiming that google needs to pay them for the rights to the peering that will get their users what we want

          It’s a major issue with the FCC right now as Verizon and their infinite wealth lobbyists are claiming that Verizon as a person has first-amendment rights to allow or disallow access to any content that traverses their network. I think it’s complete BS, they just want to hit us coming and going with more fees and tiered access to the internet and it’s various destination kind of how cable works. The worst part is that this being the crux of the net neutrality argument, the FCC is likely to rule in Verizon’s favor.

          The only defense after that I can think of is some benevolent ISP startup that works like a credit union in principal and that can somehow fund a competitive alternative to using various low-level access to backbones like Cogent and what not. Even if it’s possible, it won’t be quick to come anytime soon. I’m kind of hoping google fiber catches like wildfire as they can rollout and totally do the right thing. I can hope :/

          • anotherengineer
          • 6 years ago

          How do you like your Bell Fibre OP? I was going to get it, call eastlink to cancel, and they dropped my bill by about $30/month and up’d my internet to 80/8 for 1 year, since they couldn’t give my 30 up.

          I downloaded csgo from toronto server last night at around 8.7 to 9.4 MB/s completely using up all my bandwidth. Most servers don’t even come close to that.

          I would still like more upload speed though, kinda matters when you have relatives in Australia and you want to upload pics and stuff to them.

    • dansausage
    • 6 years ago

    Google sucks period I don’t want Google+ so I deleted all Google products. I will not talk about my personal life or the conditions I live under.I don’t think anyone
    cares.People jump at a chance to hurt others not that I care what the world thinks of me.I just do the best I can if you don’t like it to bad.My family was paying for my android phone so I got the Obama phone to save them money.I am disabled so don’t
    say get a job.

      • sweatshopking
      • 6 years ago

      wut?

      • Vrock
      • 6 years ago

      Down vote for having an Obama phone.

        • steelcity_ballin
        • 6 years ago

        Not even trolling (what’ up Vrock mang!?) what is an ObamaPhone? Assuming it’s some sort of basic connectivity device that is subsidized or otherwise paid for by not-the-person-using-it?

        PS I think I was down somewhere in your neck of the woods if memory serves, for a wedding. Was at VA beach for a few nights. Really nice and quite cheap during the off season.

          • MadManOriginal
          • 6 years ago

          It’s a term for a free cell phone that is given to low income or other qualified people. What’s ironic about the term is that the origins are in the Lifeline program set up in 1985, and then it was expanded to include cell phones under GW Bush and a Republican House and Senate in 2005. But it’s called the Obamaphone because of one silly woman who made it into a meme (look up ‘Obamaphone lady’).

            • pandemonium
            • 6 years ago

            Sounds just like Obamacare. Originally conceptualized in the 70’s as an expansion to Medicare with both parties, Republicans (notably being the first, Mitt Romney) started calling it that since they weren’t the official party that got recognized with it finally being placed into legislation to give it a negative tone.

            Republicans sure are being sore losers lately.

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            Obamacare is communism. Instead, we should make sure Affordable Care Act provisions are implemented – it’s much better.

            • farmpuma
            • 6 years ago

            Jerk the knee-jerk. Not certain it will work, but I like the concept.

            • indeego
            • 6 years ago

            How is it Communism when it’s supporting all the private insurers as they were previously? In fact, almost all private health insurers stock went up after “Obamacare” was announced.

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            Obamacare is communism. Ted Cruz told me so.

            ACA, on the other hand, is perfect

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            you should know better. Neely is a bleeding heart liberal (crybaby/enabler/antichrist) that believes in single payer. he talks about it all the time.

            • NeelyCam
            • 6 years ago

            Why can’t the gun lobby practice their rifle skills by shooting holes into golden parachutes?

            • Freon
            • 6 years ago

            To add to this, I believe it only covers a very small amount a month. I think $15-20/month. It’s really targetted to people who live in poverty so they can get basic phone service. I guess you can use it to pay for a cell phone, but it won’t pay for much of a cell phone. Not like you can get a typical $80/mo smartphone with data with it.

            • DreadCthulhu
            • 6 years ago

            The reason the Life Line program gets a lot of flak is due to the widescale abuses of the program – people signing up for multiple lines, signing up when their income is over the limit, illegal aliens signing up for service, and so on. Until recently, the FCC didn’t require that the carriers actually certify that the people signing up quailifed; since the FCC started requireing certification of eligibility, the 5 largest carriers providing Life Line service have dropped [i<]41%[/i<] of their LL subscribers. And the term "Obama phone" has caught on as an insult since while the program has its roots in the Reagan years, under Obama's administration the program has massively increased in populartiy, with spending nearly trippling in his first term of office. [url<]http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424127887323511804578296001368122888[/url<]

    • FuturePastNow
    • 6 years ago

    “Would you like to put your real name on Youtube comments?”

    “No”

    “OK, we’ll ask again later.”

    @&%$

      • steelcity_ballin
      • 6 years ago

      Or how about how I created a ‘youtube’ name, and now eveyr freaking time I load a page it asks me who I want to comment as (as if I would comment to begin with) and shows my g+ and my youtube name. EVERY VIDEO!

    • Laykun
    • 6 years ago

    Can Google PLEASE fix the damn scrolling and rendering performance in chrome on android before cramming it down my throat as the default browser on android?! You have to download the aosp android browser through the store, which currently doesn’t work on kitkat. I really like the features of chrome but its rendering performance and scroll lag drives me away every time, I feel like they’re really shooting the selves in the foot with this one. Also why does the latest maps app run so damn slow now? It seems like their ‘upgrade’ is really just cosmetic.

      • steelcity_ballin
      • 6 years ago

      What phone are you using? I have no problems with Chrome on Android and I’m even using a 2+ year old phone. The latest upgrade is not purely cosmetic, search for ‘project svelte’.

        • Laykun
        • 6 years ago

        Samsung Galaxy Note. Pretty much the top end device from 2 years ago.

    • uni-mitation
    • 6 years ago

    What are you guys drinking??? I WANT some of that!!!

    Google’s only real obligation is to their shareholders. If you are not paying for a service, then you are the product. I am sounding like a broken record….

    Do you think google provides all its services out the goodness of their hearts? Because of their “Do no evil” motto? Again……..

    Google’s bread and butter is their advertising revenue. They data-mine the hell out of all those searches that you do. Businesses pay google for their links to be displayed. These people are Google’s customers, you guys are the product that google is making money off it.

    Please, do not whine about something that you should already know about. Again…….

      • Pan Skrzetuski
      • 6 years ago

      A company’s obligations ought to be to their consumers.

      I have no problem with publicly-owned companies, but the “bottom-line first” attitude is just wrong.

      I dream of a time when businessmen and CEOs will embrace the idea that the best rewards come in providing a fine and necessary product or service to those who need it… Alas, greed 🙁

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        I love you, Pan.

        • GTVic
        • 6 years ago

        But in this case the real consumer is the corporation that pays for the data.

        As far as Google is concerned, the general public that surfs the web are equivalent to the bees in the beehive business, the unpaid interns in the corporate world, the dolphins at Sea World, etc. etc. They only need to be kept happy and productive so the honey can be sold, the photocopies can be made and so on.

        • uni-mitation
        • 6 years ago

        You are right. But let us refine the discussion then.

        Google’s paying customers are the businesses that pay Google for every ad that they serve, click, and so forth. Google, Facebook, Twitter, and many other social networking sites have paying customers. It just happens that these companies take what we produce and sell it to the paying customers.

        So, I will give you a choice for you to choose which business plan is better. The current business plan, or you paying Google NOT to datamine you, for you to pay for the free email service that they provide, for the cloud storage that they provide, and for the free searches that you make, all guaranteeing that your privacy will be protected, because you are a bona fide purchaser for fair market value. There is no such thing as a free lunch. And guess what? I don’t see people lining up to pay for their email to be hosted and for paying to keep their privacy in the internet age, in fact, they gladly give it away to the previously mentioned companies.

        So, in short, Google has been successful because they have established a business model where they serve and provide a product that customers are willing to pay for at a profitable market value, thus, their shareholders’s interests are met.

        Moral of the story? If you expect these companies to look and care for your interests, I would suggest that you pay for a fair market value for the services and goods that you expect to receive.

        No free lunch. Again…..

          • Pan Skrzetuski
          • 6 years ago

          This is true enough – we shouldn’t expect something for nothing. I was simply responding to the comment that Google is primarily beholden to their shareholders.

          As I said above, while a solid bottom line (and even high profits for additional development) are fine, they should not be at the expense of the product and the user. Otherwise we all just become slaves to money…

          @sweatshopking, I feel warm and fuzzy inside now. 🙂

    • Ashbringer
    • 6 years ago

    I don’t see the problem here? I’ve been installing CyanogenMOD and other custom roms for a long time now, with great success. It’s not hard, and it’s totally free, so who cares about 18 month period? Only care when the device manufacturer makes it impossible to root and install a custom recovery onto your devices. Those devices, like HTC and Motorola, I avoid like they were Windows 8.

    • NovusBogus
    • 6 years ago

    No SD card sucks, I agree, but it’s just one of the many corners they had to cut to come up with a $350 high-spec smartphone.

    That being said, Google’s long-term prospects depend very much on whether they can separate the hardware from the web, as the Snowden affair is just the beginning of the public realization that they were fed a bunch of BS about how everything’s better with internet. Android works quite well on its own, Chrome…not so much. But which path will they choose?

    • tipoo
    • 6 years ago

    What is the cost of those 64/128GB Apple devices though? I agree, expandable storage or a 64GB option in the N5 would be nice, but it’s still one heck of a device for half the cost of competitive flagships.

    About the OS updates…4.4 is a bit of an exception to my thinking because yes as you said, it should in theory run better on older devices. But I’ve seen iOS4 slow down the 3G to a crawl, 5 the iPad 1, and 7 the iPhone 4 and even starting to nibble at A5 based devices like the 4S/Mini. I’d rather them cut off updates than render things much slower. I tried running Jellybean on my Nexus S, and I found Googles decision to stop updating it at ICS was actually the best one.

    • indeego
    • 6 years ago

    For a while, Microsoft was a customer driven company. They actively listened to customers, and went with that.

    Then Apple came along and TOLD customers what they would like, and from then on it seems Google and MS have been taking on this approach as well. Google has been pushing services that seem unnecessary for a while now. Same with Microsoft.

    I wish Apple would focus on their cute phones, Google on their Internet integration, and Microsoft in making client/server architectures as reliable and as well supported as possible.

    Instead we have three companies that fail at a lot, and are attempting to enter markets and struggling at many.

    If Google ever mandates Google+ for me, I’ll bail. I only need search, there isn’t a single other service from Google I think isn’ t better elsewhere. Even Bing maps is better than Google Maps.

      • steelcity_ballin
      • 6 years ago

      Technically g+ is mandated now. Supposing you were a non-google using person, if you were to purchase and android phone, you’d be forced to create a gmail account which would automatically create the g+ account I believe.

        • DreadCthulhu
        • 6 years ago

        You don’t have to create a Gmail account to use any Android device I have seen*; you can’t use Google’s Apps or the Play Store without a Gmail account, but you can check the “allow install from unknown sources” box in the settings, and get non-google apps from F-Droid, Amazon, the XDA page, ect, and use the device to your hearts content. Heck, there are plenty of Chinese Android tablets & phones that don’t even come with Google Apps.

        *IIRC correctly there were some early AT&T phones that only allowed Play Store apps.

        • curtisb
        • 6 years ago

        You can (currently) bypass the Google+ creation…and if they do manage to trick you into “upgrading” your Google account, you can go into your account details and delete the Google+ account.

        I managed to get tricked into it and nearly deleted my Gmail account on the spot. I still have a few services I haven’t moved over to my Outlook.com account, though.

          • indeego
          • 6 years ago

          Google also lets you delete a G+ account. I know this because on my phone I had a popup and wasn’t paying attention and apparently it was a large JOIN G+ NOW prompt. That was all it took, there was no EULA or terms of service I had to read through.

          After deletion it was back to normal.

    • windwalker
    • 6 years ago

    [quote=”Geoff Gasior”<]As Google points out, its 18-month upgrade window is typical for the industry.[/quote<] It's funny to see people falling for this sleazy argument. What "industry" is that? Maybe the high end Android phone "industry" because neither Apple nor Microsoft do that. And it's disingenuous to claim 18 months of support when major software releases are annual. I guess claiming 23 months would have been too obvious to mislead anyone but the fiercest fanboys. The pattern is actually quite a bit simpler: high end Android devices get one major software update. The rest get nothing.

      • modulusshift
      • 6 years ago

      Um. Major Android upgrades come approximately every 6 months. And sure enough, the Galaxy Nexus launched with 4.0 and made it all the way to 4.3.

      While I don’t like that the Galaxy Nexus is now out to pasture officially, it was seriously the only move available. TI’s driver team doesn’t exist any more, because the team that made the TI’s processors doesn’t exist anymore. And you can see the effects of this, too, looking at the AOSP 4.4 ROMs for the Galaxy Nexus, there’s bugs upon bugs relating to the graphics processor, and simply no way to fix them. I’d take a solid experience towards EOL for a phone rather than one last glitchy upgrade.

      In fact, there’s still a group of people saying that Android peaked at 4.1 for the Galaxy Nexus, and that everything in 4.2 slowed it down. I actually saw some of those effects, lockscreen lag, and anyone who actually uses Bluetooth knows that the new stack in 4.2 was almost broken. It’s gotten better, but still isn’t quite as solid. But devices built with the new stack in mind do fine.

      And so, I’m perfectly happy with my new Moto X. Onwards to KitKat and beyond!

      Edit: Also, all your complaints about this are so cute. May I point out that for years, major OTA updates weren’t even a thing? Apple really started that trend. And even then, everyone knows at this point that the smoothest an iPhone performs is the moment you pick it up. From that point onward, it’s all downhill, as it picks up clutter and more and more memory intensive updates that manage to do nearly nothing new or even better. (Sorry, this might just be my particular dislike of iOS 7 coming through. I’m on a 4S right now, in between white and customized X’s.)

      Google sells you a phone on first impression, and then manages to improve the performance considerably over the life of the phone, and you all complain that it doesn’t get a 4th update 2 years after the phone was released. Apple, meanwhile, exhibits perfect caveat emptor, what you buy is the best it can be, no speed improvements inbound, best of luck! Also, we’ll intentionally slow you down with updates so that you can’t help but upgrade in 2 years. Caveat emptor and planned obsolescence and still somehow they’re the good guy.

        • windwalker
        • 6 years ago

        You’re trying too hard.
        Unless you’re a Google employee, why do you bother to know all the intricate details and excuses for the fact that the phone you bought received poor and limited support?

        You can say it was cheaper than an iPhone and so it’s fine to expect inferior support.
        If it’s good enough for you that’s all that matters.
        It’s silly and pointless to go into long winded apologetics about why you got an inferior experience and then veer into tales of past hardships followed by a final sprinkling of cynicism.

        Just accept that you chose a phone and however happy that choice did or didn’t make you.
        The over analysis is just mental masturbation.

      • modulusshift
      • 6 years ago

      One last thing: You’ll note I didn’t even mention WP. Honestly that platform has felt so botched the past couple years I forgot that some people still consider it good. Well, in my defense, I’ve never used WP8, but WP7 was such a joke, and HTC kept on getting slapped in the face. They released a top of the line smartphone, the HD2, which was well ahead of its time in all but software, and Microsoft goes, okay, WinMo is legacy, no more updates for those devices. “They don’t have the right buttons.” And some enterprising hackers still got it running on the HD2. Beyond that, okay, release some phones on WP7, and it’s practically a beta OS, the only consolation is that at least the Zune HD was the alpha. No apps materialized, the few that did got blocked, why did IE only support 6 tabs at a time? I remember openly laughing almost every time I heard of WP antics. I had several friends take leaps on WP7 phones, and by the time they had gotten fed up with them, HTC had just released a new crop, and Microsoft says, okay, now we’re going to do this right with WP8, no updates for WP7 devices. And I’m like, really, guys? “We had to update the kernel, bring it in line with desktop Windows!” Okay, then, why didn’t you do that when you had your first massive update?

      It’s a shame, I wanted to cheer them on, but WP7 seems to have made just big enough of a splash that all of the spurned users are turning people sour on WP8. I do believe that WP8 is probably a solid OS, but it’s most definitely not my type, and I’m sour enough on WP7 personally that I won’t recommend it to anyone, even though I didn’t use the device. Nokia almost made me reconsider, honestly, but…I just don’t think it’s worth it, personally, when Android has been pretty much proven good the past few years. I already jumped on a failing bandwagon with my first smartphone, a Palm Pre Plus. I’m tired of all that, just give me something that works.

        • windwalker
        • 6 years ago

        They all “just work” the day you take them out of the box.
        As you use them more intensely, for more different tasks and for longer time the cracks start to show.
        The good thing is that they have different strenghts and weaknesses and so depending on what you need and want you can choose what fits you best.

    • NeelyCam
    • 6 years ago

    I agree about the lack of microSD slot. IMO, the magical displays of Nexus devices is not enough to compensate for that. There is always something out there that’s almost as cheap and with almost as good a display but also offers a microSD slot.

    It has become more or less a requirement for me

      • Farting Bob
      • 6 years ago

      As someone looking at buying a mid range phone, it saddens me that in my price range my nearly 3 year old Galaxy S2 is tough to beat. I want an SD slot, or a minimum of 32GB storage, thats pretty much non-negotiable. That rules out most phones in the $200-300 range right off the bat.
      I’d like (but not essential) a removable battery, screen size between 4.3″ and 4.7″ and be capable of running cyanogenmod (or a stock android rom).

      Looking around the options are pretty damn poor. If the Moto G had an SD slot i’d be all over it. Hell i’d pay a $50 premium on its current price just for that.

    • ChangWang
    • 6 years ago

    TBH, I think any of us could write a similar post about Microsoft, or Apple, or Blackberry, etc. I, for one, haven’t been enthused with Microsoft’s moves since windows played second fiddle to xbox.

    • ghomfom
    • 6 years ago

    If it weren’t for Bing, we would be stuck with a Google search monopoly. The reason I do my searches with Bing!

      • [+Duracell-]
      • 6 years ago

      Don’t lie…you use Bing for the rewards program. I know I do (that, and it’s the only search provider on WP).

      Not that it’s bad, anyways. Bing gets me what I want 99.9% of the time.

        • WaltC
        • 6 years ago

        What does it get you? I supposedly have, er–five something’s–Bing is supposed to give me. Can’t you tell how interested I’ve been in discovering them?…;) What sort of “rewards” do you cash in on? (I use Bing as my default search and have ever since day one.) I use Google only when Bing can’t find what I need–which isn’t often.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 6 years ago

          I’ve gotten about 25 bucks of Amazon credit for doing basically nothing other than switch the site I search in. And as Duracell said, I find it’s very good 99.9% (a stat I made up) of the time.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 6 years ago

            For those of us that don’t want to be monetized and tracked (as much) there’s duckduckgo, ixquick and startpage.

      • Eldar
      • 6 years ago

      Why can’t Bing or Google integrate some sort of categorizing/organization into their search results? They’ve been giving us just pages and pages of links for years–you’d think in all this time they’d be able to tweak things a little more.

        • oldog
        • 6 years ago

        Bing does in Win 8.1. Probably the coolest feature of the OS. From the Metro desktop swipe from the left and “search everywhere”. The results are categorized in a very useful and logical way.

        Takes some gettin used to, but cool. (I’m not sure it’s all that helpful but it is a step in the right direction).

    • deruberhanyok
    • 6 years ago

    I know it sucks that the Galaxy Nexus isn’t getting the 4.4 update, but Texas Instruments (the company that made the processor in that device) got out of the smartphone processor business a year ago. The processor isn’t supported any longer – I expect the decision was made for them, in this instance.

    That said, never fear – [url=http://get.cm/<]CyanogenMod[/url<] is here!

    • Unknown-Error
    • 6 years ago

    Huh? What did just read….

    • BoilerGamer
    • 6 years ago

    Pardon me, but this sounds nothing but idle whining about things:

    Nexus devices are low margin devices designed to compete on prices, SD card slot adds to that cost significantly due to Microsoft’s FAT patents.

    32GB max is some what disappointing to those that insist to leave their entire media library on the phone/tablet, for me it is enough to last me on any short trips & for any long trips I just rotate more files in from my laptop. Google have shown that if there is a major upheavel about storage space they will adapt(the compliant about 8GB Nexus 7 2012 lead to 16GB Nexus 7 price drop and 32GB Nexus 7 getting introduced at the 16GB’s price point). [url=http://www.androidcentral.com/week-s-sidebar-poll-did-you-order-nexus-5<]The high % of Nexus 5 32GB[/url<] being bought is a sure indication to Google that consumers prefer more storage and they likely will respond to consumer demand. If you want to use Google Map in another country, buy an unlocked phone(maybe a Nexus :D) and get a local Sim. That takes care of the roaming fee problem. Google Reader didn't make money for Google, and it was shut down for that reason. There are plenty of new reader options like Feedly, and Google allowed you to download your reader history and start anew with some other reader. Youtube comment quality have been abhorring for quite some time, and requesting Google Plus account(which you would have if you have a youtube account already) to comment imo is a good fix. Sure Google could have allowed you to use Facebook/Twitter accounts too but since the Google Plus is more closely integrated with Youtube, but it shouldn't be a bother to anyone who actually cares about Youtube(as you would have already had a Google Plus account from your Youtube account registration). Finally, the Galaxy Nexus no 4.4 point that have been driven through the ground to the molten lava where it should rest. The problem was simple: Google could not make an official 4.4 update without Ti supplying updated official OMAP processor driver for 4.4 Rom makers on xda might have carte blache to make custom drivers form a SOC someone else produced to make 4.4 work on Gnex, but not an official mega corperation like Google. In conclusion: There is no God but Google! [/Sarcasm]

    • lilbuddhaman
    • 6 years ago

    The changes to youtube deserve a verse of their own. Even ignoring the completely-destroying-the-community-of-youtube commenting system change, the changes they’ve made have been ridiculously stupid.

    This is going to be a big echo-chamber of Google complaints.

    • blorbic5
    • 6 years ago

    I can’t stand the new map app, sometimes I feel like they change things on it just for the sake of change.

      • Eldar
      • 6 years ago

      I have a wifi only Nexus 7–I’d love to be able to use Google Maps with the GPS, but even with caching it was barely useful (couldn’t handle any changes to route without a data connection). And now it’s become really useless….

        • derFunkenstein
        • 6 years ago

        so does it try to get live traffic when you switch routes? I guess that would make sense. I can use mine tethered to my phone (since my carrier allows it) for a best-of-both-worlds setup. Big screen for GPS and route switching.

          • Eldar
          • 6 years ago

          That may be the reason–not sure. We’ve used 3rd party apps that work without a data connection–their general mapping functionality usually isn’t as slick as Google Maps, but at least they work without a connection.

          We don’t have data on our dumb phone, so that’s not really an option for us.

    • Mr. Eco
    • 6 years ago

    Few years ago Google bought SketchUp. Then Google did absolutely nothing to develop or improve he product. Last year the sold it to another company – and only in few months that other company produced the so needed 64-bit API.

    • sweatshopking
    • 6 years ago

    Come to the outlook, WP world. Its warm, and the people are friendly. MS promises updates for 36 months minimum on windows phone 8 devices, and they own part of the Facebook. You know you want a pretty new Nokia. The 1520 looks particularly inviting, and their new screen tech and camera tech is awesome. Do it Geoff.

    PS if you did. You’d whine about how it doesn’t do some moronic thing your android did, and I’d have to listen to it. So maybe, don’t?

      • Techgoudy
      • 6 years ago

      I just moved away from WP to iOS for the first time and I am glad. Although WP is an awesome platform in terms of performance and capabilities, their app selection was horrendous and buggy.

      I really dislike android with a burning passion. Their devices have been far to buggy. They start out great when you first buy them and as the vendor updates the OS they get noticeably slower and more prone to crashing. After about a year and a half worth of updates, some cases less time, they stop supporting your phones period and your phone is basically left in a fragile and sometimes unusable state. I absolutely hate that.

      In terms of a platform that takes care of it’s older users, Apple and Microsoft do that job well. I would recommend an iPhone or a Windows Phone (in particular, Nokia phones), before I would recommend an Android phone.

        • indeego
        • 6 years ago

        I have a GIII and I haven’t noticed this.

        It’s the apps and background BS that can and will bring down a phone. Snapchat, which is now wildly popular, is probably the buggiest software I’ve ever seen. Google Services, like +, is also buggy (crashes my GF’s and her daughter’s phones several times a day.)

        I’d recommend an iPhone for the first three months they are available. They are then outclassed by most high-end Androids. I don’t like Android all that much either, and I eagerly hope Firefox OS catches on in the high-end.

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          switch from snapchat to 6snap, and you’ll never have issues.

            • indeego
            • 6 years ago

            uh, I’ll stick with the app that keeps getting me laid, thank you very much. 😉 I don’t use snapchat because of its technical prowess.

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            Wtf.

      • trackerben
      • 6 years ago

      Well I’m planning to get an Asha 503 (S40 OS) if it does wifi hotspot. I don’t need apps much on my handy comms, that’s what a big-screen iPad or WP8 Bay Trail tablet is for. If apps on a cheap sub-7in screen are the idea, the latest droids may be good enough with DIY add-ons and champion apps like Google maps and BSPlayer – although the rest can be iffy, old, or defeatured. There’s also the tremendous malware issue of non-SE Android forks as reported by HS/FBI/NSA (who ought to know:))

      That said, WP8 on top Nokia phone hardware is steadier than the Android equivalent and more flexible than the iOS equivalent. WP8 seems to have a more sophisticated UI than the others (other than BlackBerry), its basic suite is quite ok especially the Office readers, and its apps are improving although lacking diversity.

      But for my needs the reliable nokia Asha may be more than enough for the price (and cheaper than the equivalent defeatured Nokia 510/520). Versus maybe or maybe not good enough Android, or vs. surely the best quality but also surely the priciest iPhone.

      Of course if money is no object and a standardized yet premium appliance-like experience is your phone ideal, iPhone 5x is basically it.

        • trackerben
        • 6 years ago

        I’ve just read that no current Asha smartphone can do hotspot. So I’m looking at Lumia 520 or 620 after all. There are rumours about an upcoming dual-SIM Lumia, probably a 720 derivative. This would be a bit expensive but has what I’m looking for – reliability, full comms suite, hotspot, geolocation and satnav, basic media playback, and cloud backup. I wish dual-SIMs would come to the cheaper 520 or its successor as Apple has ruled out this feature in iPhones for now.

        I use a decent Lenovo but Android’s UI experience has been sub-par at times and its security issues are overwhelming for a consumer platform. However, it is the champion replacement for older featurephone platforms but for Nokia’s S40. Below a certain price level, Android offers traditional pros and cons. The lower the price and build, the more limited the useable functions. So to do more in Android, one has to spend more for access to official appstores or better hardware/OS integration (or else go niche homebrew).

        But at higher prices Apple’s and Nokia’s proven stuff come into play. Only a preference for Google’s promiscous and eclectic development keeps it ahead at this level. I’m not into this because for my needs, phones are first of all communication appliances, and hobby/entertainment/productivity platforms second. Android just isn’t as smooth and easy an info appliance as an iPhone or Lumia. WP8 has matured enough that I figure I won’t be investing more in its development than I do for any other appliance, which is usually zero.

      • dashbarron
      • 6 years ago

      While you were gone SSK, there were only 3 of us with WPs. Now there are four.

      I’ve been all around happy with the the production level and capabilities of my phone and OS. I don’t have a 1520 but it looks so silky smooth.

      And odd as it sounds coming the MS camp, I really distrust Google and their use of my data. About every month a new story leaks out of the things they’re doing with your info and how they don’t have your back, at all, despite their “do no evil” approach. At least with MS I know whose stabbing me with the fiery fork.

        • [+Duracell-]
        • 6 years ago

        I’m on the same WP8 boat. Google’s been kind of a douche lately not allowing Microsoft to develop a native Youtube app with ads, as well.

        • curtisb
        • 6 years ago

        Count me in the WP user crowd, too. Have been since it released in 2010 starting with a Samsung Focus, then got a Focus S, and now a proud Lumia 920 owner.

        I’ve transitioned all of my important stuff away from my old Gmail accounts over to my Live/Outlook email.

          • sweatshopking
          • 6 years ago

          Keep it up! I’m currently working at bath and body works, laugh away, and strangely, of the 15 staff, 5 have windows phones. Its weird, but they all LOVE them

            • curtisb
            • 6 years ago

            I work at a small college and we’re starting to see it more and more. I’ve been VERY happy with each of the devices I’ve had.

            The only real issue I have is since GDR2/Amber and it’s with WiFi. We have the same SSID’s across all of our APs so users can roam without having to reconnect, but use different subnets for each building. If I have the “always on” setting enabled for WiFi and travel from one building to the another that’s in close proximity, it successfully roams from one AP to another. However, it’s not automatically updating the IP address anymore, which results in no internet connection until I disable and re-enable WiFi. I have verified this to be a problem on at least one other 920. I’ve turned off the “always on” setting for now, which isn’t as big of a concern for me since I have unlimited data…but I know it can be a concern for others.

            Of course, iOS devices sometimes have the same issue in that they often won’t roam to an AP that has a stronger signal if it can still connect to the original AP it connected to. This has resulted in complaints about WiFi being slow on iOS devices because they have a weak connection. iOS 7 may have fixed this, though.

            Full disclosure: I’m the CTO and am responsible for the network infrastructure…so I know how the SSID’s and VLAN’s are configured since I did it. Again, it was working as expected prior to GDR2/Amber. 🙂

            • anotherengineer
            • 6 years ago

            Sweet. Can I get some soap on a rope?? 😉

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            Nope. We don’t sell that. You can buy soap. Just wait till Jan when they take the triclocan out.

            • anotherengineer
            • 6 years ago

            ??

            You mean this?
            [url<]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triclosan[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            yeah, great spelling!

            • anotherengineer
            • 6 years ago

            Its wut we doo!! 🙂

        • Kurotetsu
        • 6 years ago

        Currently using a Nokia Lumia 521, and I’ve been very impressed with how much $80 (2nd hand) has gotten me. Very responsive (it blows away my previous Android phone, an HTC One V) with no hiccups and all the applications I need. My only gripe is the lack of flash on the camera, but for $80 I really have no room to complain.

      • DeComposer
      • 6 years ago

      I’m using WP8 on a Samsung ATIV S.

      Because integration with Exchange is seamless and painless, I always have my work calendar items on both the Calendar tile and the lock screen, and I can have my work email and personal email on separate tiles.

      The ATIV S has a Micro SDXC slot. With the 64GB Micro SDXC card (), my storage is 80GB.which lets me carry a substantial library of movies and music around with me.

      And with a 4.8″ 1280 x 720 screen, the movie-watching experience is actually enjoyable (unlike the experience on my wife’s iPhone 5).

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        did you setup the 3 rows of tiles on your ativ yet? It’s coming for all developer unlocked phones, but so far it’s been hacked onto the ativ. I want it!

          • curtisb
          • 6 years ago

          Devices with screens smaller than 5″ won’t get the three column option with Update 3. It was available/working in an earlier developer release, but was removed in later versions. No reason as to why, yet.

          [url<]http://www.wpcentral.com/windows-phone-update-3-and-missing-3-row-live-tile-option[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            I know that, but I expect a way for us with dev licenses to unlock at a later date.

      • NovusBogus
      • 6 years ago

      WP does look pretty spiffy, let me just get my homebrews ported over and…oh wait, nevermind. Bah, that’s not a problem with a good ROM so I’ll just…oh wait, nevermind. Well that’s okay, its MS so it will play well with my company’s mobile LOB stuff and…oh wait, nevermind. So it can’t run my personal apps and it can’t run my company’s apps, at least I can get some good third-party stuff from the…oh wait, nevermind. Erm…well…surely these pointless, arbitrary, and ultimately self-defeating limitations will be fixed by one of the independent OEMs that isn’t a subsidiary of…oh wait, nevermind. B-b-but at least if I throw out everything I already have and shackle myself to Redmond in real time I’ll be able to count on awesome long term support because the last time they launched an ambitious cross-platform technology they followed through and…

      [i<]Why Steve, why??[/i<] Your'a breakin' ma heart...

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        WHAT? first off, there are custom roms for a bunch of the devices, second, your company can make and deploy a windows app, and it has the best corporate management of the big 3 OS’. you can’t blame WP cause you’re company doesn’t have an app for it. it has 150,000 apps, with insta, vine, etc. qqing about apps is soooo passe. I’ve done a number of homebrew apps on it wp7 myself, including a TR reader.

        • curtisb
        • 6 years ago

        [list<][*<]As of WP8 GDR3 (aka Update 3) You can developer unlock your phone for free and side load your personal apps. [/*<][*<]There are options for deploying your company apps as well. There's an entire section in the settings of the phone dedicated to company apps. [/*<][*<]There are plenty of third-party apps for many popular services that don't have first-party apps. There are a large number of first-party apps available now, with more on the way. [/*<][*<]And Apple has independent OEMs for their...oh wait.[/*<] [/list<] Next time kindly research the platform before posting FUD. I won't deny there are some issues, but it's certainly not as bad as you make it out to be. Google obviously perceives it as a threat now as they refuse to create any applications for the OS. And when Microsoft released a stellar YouTube app, Google threatened to sue based on some half-baked terms of service...which neither Android nor iOS adhere to either. They also want Microsoft to rewrite the app in pure HTML5. Guess what...neither the Android nor iOS version are written in pure HTML5. Fortunately, there are some really good third-party YouTube apps, such as MetroTube, available on the platform.

          • NovusBogus
          • 6 years ago

          [quote<]As of WP8 GDR3 (aka Update 3) You can developer unlock your phone for free and side load your personal apps.[/quote<] AFAIK you're limited to two apps, and the $99/year option is still ten. I will grant you that that's an improvement from a year ago but it's still a stupid limitation that turns people away from the platform. Note that I'm not just being a fanboy here, I personally have five nontrivial WP7.5 homebrews (I got a first-gen LG with a reg editor, too bad nobody does that anymore) and about as many for Android and it's kind of a big deal if my phone won't do what I need. [quote<]There are options for deploying your company apps as well. There's an entire section in the settings of the phone dedicated to company apps.[/quote<] $30 fee plus $6 per month, per device, for InTune may be an "option" for private LOB deployment but it's a stupid option when Android and WPF are both free. [quote<]There are plenty of third-party apps for many popular services that don't have first-party apps. There are a large number of first-party apps available now, with more on the way.[/quote<] Are they still bribing developers to create apps? I lost my MSDN account when I switched jobs a few months ago so I don't know if those desperate but unintentionally funny emails are still going out or not. The fact that so many popular apps and services are coming from middlemen speaks volumes, though. [quote<]And Apple has independent OEMs for their...oh wait.[/quote<] Apple pisses me off too. But at least they aren't trying to be something they're not. For what it's worth I actually do want to see WP/WinRT succeed because Apple sucks and I don't really trust Google, but the MS developer ecosystem will continue to burn unless/until Ballmer's successor reins in the VP shark tank. And they have a lot of atonement for what happened with Silverlight.

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            I agree that there are some annoyances, and I know the boyz at windowsphonehacker.com, and the big issue was getting a wp8 device, since the main guy is a young student. He recently got one, so we might be seeign some more stuff coming out. That being said, nokia makes strong boot protection, and it’s been tough to break. LG’s is easy, samsung’s mid range, but nokia is tough. If they can get in, we’ll see more custom roms as we did for the LG’s and Samsungs.

            • TO11MTM
            • 6 years ago

            Microsoft has WAY upped their game as far as attracting Developers. 19$/yr now gets you BOTH desktop and mobile.

            [url<]http://blogs.windows.com/windows_phone/b/wpdev/archive/2013/11/06/unifying-developer-registration-windows-and-windows-phone.aspx[/url<] I don't know whether the 'rewards program' or whatever the hell the dev center version is called counts as bribing to you or not (sounds like it is, and I sort of agree,) but it's there for the time being. Whether it helps temporarily stall the 'chicken-egg' problem of developing for the platform remains to be seen. I hope it does; Microsoft appears to have remembered that Ballmer may have had some wisdom when he did the monkey boy dance. Insofar as supporting the development community goes, I think for a while the only light at the end of the tunnel was when shortly after things looked their bleakest (We learned about the app store, we learned about the fees,) Someone dislodged a skull from someone's bottom and realized that not releasing an Express version of VS 2012 for desktop was pushing some developers to just give up on Microsoft as a whole. Still, that was a while ago, and the improvement has been slow, and VS2010 Express still is the high point as far as accessibility/expandability on the free versions (i.e. Where the hell is .NetMF support on an express edition of 2012? =/)

      • BabelHuber
      • 6 years ago

      [quote<]PS if you did. You'd whine about how it doesn't do some moronic thing your android did, and I'd have to listen to it. So maybe, don't?[/quote<] Yes, some 'moronic' things like: - App sideloading - rooting - full access to the file system - A wide variety of custom ROMs - Installing Apps to external SD card - Using any App as default App To just name a few. If you are happy with your WP phone, fine, I don't mind. But for me it is too restricted to be even worth consideration. Nokia makes good hardware, but it has already been sold to MS, so it is gone anyways. I enjoy running my SGS4 with Android 4.4 meanwhile.

      • End User
      • 6 years ago

      I find it hilarious that you led with Outlook. Talk about a prehistoric outlook on the tech world. Welcome to 1995!

        • NovusBogus
        • 6 years ago

        Outlook is useful if you want something that handles both email and scheduling in one place, and there aren’t many Windows friendly alternatives. Too bad about the stupid ribbon menus though.

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        Idk if you’ve used outlook.com, but its a damn good email host. I don’t use the office program.

          • End User
          • 6 years ago

          I subscribe to Office 365 and use my outlook.com account to login to all my Windows 8.1 systems. Skydrive is installed on every system. Meh.

          Apple, Dropbox and Google offer more compelling features as far as I am concerned.

          The important thing is that we have options. Even you, an unbelievably entrenched MS fan, should appreciate that. Dedication to only one platform is folly.

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            Of course I like options, but I’m curious what superior features google drive and icloud bring over SkyDrive? And I’m glad you agree that outlook.com is a solid choice.
            It’s also HILARIOUS you call me “entrenched”. you’re at least as big an apple fanGURL

            • End User
            • 6 years ago

            r u Rob Ford?

            If anything I am a Linux fan.

            Edit: Oh, apologies. I recall that you bought a HP TouchPad when HP dropped the price to get ride of them. r u still having fun with it?

            • sweatshopking
            • 6 years ago

            You’re a both fan. Irrational in both cases. No, I got rid of it for a cheap Lego set for my kids. Android is the worst webos was decent, just no support at all.

        • DeComposer
        • 6 years ago

        Maybe someday, when you’re old enough to get a job, you’ll understand why you want Outlook.

          • End User
          • 6 years ago

          lol

          As a sys admin I’m old enough to know you don’t.

    • Welch
    • 6 years ago

    I too have felt like you do… that feeling of “So close yet so far”. Google really is starting to show signs that its not offering the very best that it can. Simple things like SD card slots or higher memory offerings for premium phones like the Nexus 5. Even if it costs more, make it an option to consumers, Its obviously in demand!

    Google… your selling point used to be that you were the people’s company. The guy with the towel in the corner of the common person after 4 rounds with a guy twice our size. But now it seems like your taking breaks between rounds. We need you Google, we need you to be that guy again. Put out those products that don’t just meet the standard but creates them. Don’t give us a product we already need, instead introduce us to one we didn’t know how we lived without. Stop feeling the need to include yourself in areas you didn’t create or can’t completely turn upside down. Your a trend setter not a trend follower. Practicality and innovation are your design, not aesthetics and menial changes to pedal the new flavor of the fiscal year. And most of all, live up to the motto on which your company was founded “Don’t be evil” – you know who you meant when you wrote that… and so do we 😉

    • jjj
    • 6 years ago

    Yeah unfortunately Google lost it’s way in the last 2 years or so and there are at least a bunch more things they messed up. Not sure who can be the next good guy but we certainly need one.

    • allreadydead
    • 6 years ago

    No need to worry about NSA spying on your cloud storage as, Google recently admitted that they (NSA) has access to (y)our mails in GMail. I think we can be sure that NSA has full access to (y)our Google Drive too.
    I guess they are not into nickelback at all,so we are safe… For now.

    IMHO, Googles unofficial official motto “do no evil” began to fade away. Even the rumors about moto’s new phone might spy on you with it’s always on voice command system is not nice. I’d laugh to such claim but sadly, recent gmail confession made me more paranoid about Google and it’s services.
    Google is now a big company like Microsoft. I just hope they analyze Microsoft’s mistakes well and don’t repeat them while taking good things from MS…

      • Welch
      • 6 years ago

      You should probably not take that out of context. Yes the NSA had access to Gmail, Yahoo and a few other websites data, but supposedly not with their permission. The NSA was accessing their data BETWEEN servers as its being transfered. They were removing SSL copying all packets and then re-adding SSL to send the packets on their way.

      Google spoke out about it an claimed that something should be done about a government that thinks its alright to spy on its people and called for a serious change. You make it sound like we know that they handed our stuff over to the NSA while serving them breakfast at Eric Schmidt’s house.

        • lilbuddhaman
        • 6 years ago

        The only thing I see Google doing differently is charging the government for the data, and that is why they are so loud about it being taken forcibly atm. Google is a data company, and the government is essentially taking their product off their shelves for free.

        So yeah, the government is pirating. Maybe they should be sued.

          • NovusBogus
          • 6 years ago

          Doesn’t the DMCA allow for a potential pirate to get the damnatio memoriae treatment without actually proving wrongdoing took place? Fellas, we may have stumbled on a way to stop government abuse once and for all!

        • jss21382
        • 6 years ago

        Google owns essentially the most valuable dataset in the world, and they were shocked to find the spy agencies were listening in via the part of their network that was left essentially unprotected…I don’t buy it.

        • allreadydead
        • 6 years ago

        Sadly, it wasn’t me who made it “sound” like that. It was Google;
        [url<]http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/aug/14/google-gmail-users-privacy-email-lawsuit[/url<] And then, there is this; [url<]https://techreport.com/blog/25092/i-choose-to-be-spied-on[/url<] I do not trust goverments. Just for the same reason that you stated in your post of that article; goverments are not made of 1 person. Are all the goverment officers from bottom to top in that said "civilized" countries are clean and to be trusted to the end ? I don't want to be spied on, I don't want to be part of the hunt for absolute power and control over all humans. I do not trust humans enough to hand ALL my data. Do you ?

        • YukaKun
        • 6 years ago

        Well, the best way to make spying easier is to make the people want you to spy on them 😛

        The low price for the new Moto phone is way too sweet, although most phones should be around that price, really.

        Cheers!

    • Melanine
    • 6 years ago

    I am no fan of Google, but this line is golden.

    [QUOTE]All of its current Nexus devices top out at a measly 32GB. Meanwhile, the latest Apple devices are available with up to 64GB and in some cases 128GB of flash.[/QUOTE]

    So yet again Apple is the good guy, because “at least” Apple give us an option of 64/128 GB..

    LOL

      • dme123
      • 6 years ago

      Let’s not forget they don’t orphan your £500+ phone when it’s 18 months old. They’ve only just stopped upgrading the 4+ year old 3GS, and the iPhone 4 has at least another years worth of having the same iOS version as the latest and greatest. Apple are by no means perfect, but as a business user I can buy their handsets and know that build quality and support will allow them a 3-4 year lifespan.

        • The Dark One
        • 6 years ago

        The iPhone 4 is positively sluggish on iOS 7, while the GNex runs better on 4.3 than it did on 4.0.

        It’s the move I wish Google had done with the Nexus S. That phone didn’t see any benefit from Project Butter because it was just too slow and too memory-starved.

          • Great_Big_Abyss
          • 6 years ago

          My wife’s iPhone 4 has ios 7 and it’s no slower than my SGSII running Android 4.1 (jellybean…)

          Is it as fast as the iPhone 5 she used to have (until she broke it)? No. But it still does the job just fine. In particular the updated camera app is very snazzy.

          Don’t get me wrong…I’m an Apple hater through and through, but even I have to admit their product support is…wait for it…Legendary!

        • nico1982
        • 6 years ago

        [quote<]and the iPhone 4 has at least another years worth of having the same iOS version as the latest and greatest.[/quote<] Do you know if they plan to release Siri, AirPlay and AirDrop on the iPhone 4 too? What about Panorama, turn-by-turn navigation and flyover in Maps and Facetime over cellular network? 😛

        • derFunkenstein
        • 6 years ago

        There’s a difference in that Apple still sold the iPhone 4 up until this past September, a full 3 years after its debut. When’s the last time you could buy a brand new Galaxy Nexus from a carrier or from Google Play? More than a year ago. Once a phone has been retired for a year, Apple and Google are both abandoning updates.

      • WillBach
      • 6 years ago

      You’re conflating a SKU offered with “goodness”. I don’t think Geoff wrote it that way. (My opinion, not my employer’s).

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      IMO Apple might be the worse offender here, just because of their pricing. Sure you can have 64GB of flash, but you have to pay $200 above the base 16GB model to do it ($100 of that to step up to 32GB instead). 128GB becomes $300 more (in the case of the iPad). Meanwhile I paid $40 above the base cost of a 16GB Nexus 7 to get a 32GB model. It’s overpriced still, compared to the cost of actually adding the extra storage, but it’s way closer to reality. 60% closer. 😉

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      Yet he values the value argument. That’s the contradiction. Apple charges $100 more per upgrade level for flash. That’s how they can afford to pay for the extra lines that produce so many different versions of their TWO iPad’s.

      A line for iPad Mini, iPad Mini non-retina, iPad Air, and even a line for iPad 2. Then separate lines for 16, 32, 64, and 128 GB of flash. Then separate lines for Wifi versus another for Wifi+4G. Multiply that times the four products. That’s just iPad. That’s a lot of production and a lot of widening of the product stack.

      This is what Jobs warned about. He wanted to keep the stack narrow and efficient, “clean,” so as to maximize profit and allow for price drops as needed. Right now, Apple won’t be as flexible (not that Tim Cook would let them be).

      Google, on the other hand, is selling their devices far lower out the gate. Something has to give. They can’t offer the plethora of options Apple can and remain profitable at a low price. They’re 90’s Dell’ing the production of their tablets through Asus. Narrow the options, raise the volume, reduce the cost per unit, and get a very slim profit on each one.

      Flood the market. Google did its due diligence and research. This is how Windows killed the Apple computer. Swarm the market with cheap, good enough hardware, push the software argument until TONS of cheapseats outweighs the greater software per user argument of iOS. Shove Apple into the niche closet, lock the door, and slam down the dresser across the door to be sure.

      In the dark, Apple will realize their mistake only too late. Sadly, it seems Microsoft voluntarily went into the closet ahead of Apple because they knew that’s where Apple was headed, but they lacked the foresight to see why going there was a bad idea. At this point, they aren’t thinking for themselves, just going wherever they think the other guys are going.

      They can keep each other company in the closet. They’ll probably even make suing Google into a profitable venture where they get a license fee to limp along at a little more money than they would normally. Rockstars, indeed.

        • sweatshopking
        • 6 years ago

        You know the Lumia 520 is the best reviewed phone in its price point? They’re also selling a fair number. Ms knows about cheap and flooding, and they’re working on it. Android is doing well, in terms of sales anyway. Its a joke in terms of satisfaction.

    • mongoosesRawesome
    • 6 years ago

    The lack of upgrade to Kit Kat for Galaxy Nexus has everything to do with TI not offering support of that device and nothing to do with it’s ability to run the OS. Suggest you go with Cyanogenmod if you need the latest Android OS.

      • psuedonymous
      • 6 years ago

      Yup. I haven’t heard of ANY OMAP-based devices announced to have an upgrade to 4.4. I’m sure there will be plenty of custom roms that provide the 4.4 kernel and visual upgrades for the Galaxy Nexus though.

      One thing that takes the sting out of the ‘no microSD’ tail this time round is tat USB-OTG works fine for the Nexus 5. I can bear using one of those tiny microUSB drives for the rare occasions where I need to manually port extra data on and off.

    • DreadCthulhu
    • 6 years ago

    First of all, great article – I have been feeling much the same about Google lately. SD cards make things so much easier for even non-technical users. My mother-in law got her first smart-phone last year (a Droid Razr M), and I was nice and ripped a good hunk of her CD collection to put on her phone. I could have taught her how to manage what songs are on the device, how to add or remove songs, to be careful on how much streaming she does (on Verizon, with 1 GB data cap) ect, but I just slapped them on an $20 SD card so she doesn’t have to worry about all that.

    Latter on she accidentally deleted all the pictures she took with her phone; I told her to mail me the SD card, I plugged it into my computer & ran an undelete program, and easily recovered all but one of the pictures. She lives 75 miles away, so that was much cheaper than driving down there, or having her ship then entire phone.

    She likes her phone, but unless Google decides to put an SD card in the successors to the Moto X or the Droid trio, she will have to go elsewhere when she gets a new phone in a year or so.

    PS Google – Android really needs a Trash Can/Recycling bin like desktop OSes have had for decades.

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