Mixing power-line networking with Wi-Fi proves intoxicating

You may recall my failed attempt at using a second Wi-Fi router in repeater mode in order to overcome some signal-strength issues in the upper level of my house. I learned very quickly that compromising half (or more) of your wireless bandwidth in order to talk to a second router wirelessly isn't a very good trade-off for most clients. That's especially true in my case since our home cable modem service can reach up to 220 Mbps downstream, well beyond the delivered speeds we see out of our very nice wireless AC router, the Asus RT-AC87U.

The alternative to using a wireless router-to-router link is, obviously, some form of wired connection. Running Ethernet between the two routers and putting our older Asus RT-N66U into access point mode should allow us to have two sources of Wi-Fi signals at different spots in the house, both capable of full-speed communication with the Internet. But there's a big problem with that plan. Between the weirdness of our atrium-split floorplan and my own essential physical laziness, there was about zero chance that I'd actually run an Ethernet cable inside the walls anytime soon.

Fortunately, after my last post on this subject, some of you suggested trying a different sort of wired connection: power-line networking. A pair of power-line adapters will transfer data across your existing home electrical wiring. Although those sorts of products started out pretty poorly, they apparently have matured nicely in recent years. I immediately was intrigued by the idea and soon ordered a pair of these TP-Link adapters from Amazon for 70 bucks.

The idea was to put one adapter next to my main router and the other one next to the access-point router, with Ethernet connections going from each adapter to the adjacent router. The power-line network would then bridge between the two routers, hopefully providing a fast, reliable, low-latency connection.

Making it happen turned out to be a bit of an adventure, but not for the reasons you might expect.

When the power-line adapters arrived, I didn't mess around. I pulled them from the box, briefly glanced at the instructions and discarded them, and connected one adapter to my main router. Then I ran upstairs and plugged the other adapter into the wall socket in my bedroom and attached my laptop to it via Ethernet. I seriously didn't press any buttons or even look at any indicator lights on the little white wall-warts. Within seconds, I was pulling around 120 Mbps—maybe a little more—in a bandwidth test, with packet latency of 1-4 ms.

Man, that was easy.

Yes, the power-line adapter is rated for "up to 1200 Mbps," but I never expected to get practical speeds that fast. 120 Mbps is fast enough to outrun the Wi-Fi capabilities of most of the phones and tablets we use, and heck, I had the thing plugged into an outlet on an exterior wall that's as far away from the other adapter as possible within the house.

My next step was to connect the laptop to the RT-N66U and switch it from repeater mode into AP mode. Then I plugged the router's upstream port into the power-line adapter and fired everything up. Seemed like I was good to go, right?

What followed was a lot of disappointment, as I found that Wi-Fi clients on the RT-N66U only achieved about 60 Mbps on the 2.4GHz network and  about 30 Mbps on 5GHz. What the heck? It seemed like things were no faster than before.

The process was more chaotic that I might care to admit, but my next steps involved a lot of A/B testing of various components of this network in order to track down the problem.

Moving the secondary power-line adapter to an outlet with a more central location in the house boosted Ethernet speeds to about 180 Mbps, with peaks near the 220-Mbps limit of our cable-modem service. My laptop, when directly connected to the power-line adapter, loved it. The location change also raised the speed of Wi-Fi clients on the RT-N66U to 35-38 Mbps on 5GHz and over 70 Mbps on 2.4GHz, but it wasn't exactly a breakthrough.

Was something wrong with my router, or did the combination of Wi-Fi plus power-line somehow not provide the stability needed to reach higher transfer rates?

Ultimately, I wound up sitting here in Damage Labs with the RT-N66U attached to a port on my GigE switch and configured with unique SSIDs on its 2.4GHz and 5GHz segments. Everything was as explicit as possible (maybe including my language). With my laptop five feet away, I could reach peaks of 80 Mbps on 2.4GHz and 40 Mbps on 5GHz, nothing more.

I knew the RT-N66U was capable of higher speeds, but it just wasn't delivering. Thinking there might be some bug in the latest  Asus firmware update, I installed the alternative Merlin firmware to see if that would help, but speeds didn't improve.

More tweaking of Wi-Fi parameters and such was involved along the way. I'm condensing a lot of hazy frustration. But at one point while spelunking through the menus, I noticed some settings for WDS bridging that I couldn't alter while the router was in AP mode. It looked like, possibly, the router might still be configured to bridge to the AC87U over 5GHz Wi-Fi—a leftover from when I had the thing in repeater mode.

Hmm.

I wound up going nuclear and doing a factory reset on the router. Then, after a bit of configuration back into AP mode, a breakthrough: speeds well in excess of 80 Mbps on both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands.

The frigging router had been secretly stuck in WDS mode, and at least half of its 5GHz bandwidth had been reserved for wireless bridging. Ugh.

With that issue sorted, I gradually set everything back up exactly how I'd intended, testing periodically along the way. Ultimately, the RT-N66U was talking to the main network over the power-line adapters and broadcasting the same SSIDs as our main router. Clients could connect to it seamlessly. I made sure there was no overlap in Wi-Fi channel use. We now had reasonably solid 5GHz connectivity in every room of the house, with a no-doubt 2.4GHz signal as a backup.

I haven't done a ton of directed testing on the variability or reliability of the power-line link, but in regular use through the past few days, the new setup has been essentially flawless. I've offered my family the chance to complain several times each, but no one has noticed any hiccups. Periodic speed tests with phone and tablets have reached peaks around 75-80 Mbps over Wi-Fi on either router. The desktop PCs with Wi-Fi can range higher, to 180 Mbps or more.  Everything more or less works like it did before, but the Wi-Fi dead spots are eliminated and, thanks to stronger signals, performance is up generally.

I do have one caveat about the power-line adapters, though. After I first plugged them in, I noticed some strange, subtle noises while sitting at my desk working. Eventually, I realized I was hearing interference caused by the power-line network doing its thing. Moving my speakers' power plug from the wall socket to the UPS resolved the problem, but it's possible we could encounter similar problems elsewhere over time.

Other than that concern and the havoc caused by the router issues, setting up the power-line networking stuff has been a huge win. Worth checking out if you need a fast, painless extension to the other side of the house.

Comments closed
    • killadark
    • 4 years ago

    200mbps…
    im lucky to get .70mbps at peak times 😀 glorious 4g network and 7-10mbps at best

    • Kougar
    • 4 years ago

    Glad to hear powerline-ethernet worked for you, and that you were also able to solve that router problem! I think it’s very underrated for the convenience and performance.

    I use older 200Mbps rated gear so I was very curious how the 1200Mbps stuff performed in real-world use, and 120Mbps is definitely 3x what I can get. Looks like the crazy-high ratings aren’t complete fluff after all.

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    Asus firmware strikes again! ASUS are the #1 motherboard vendor, so they [i<]must[/i<] know what they're doing with firmware and testing, right? [i<]Right?[/i<] If I billed every hour lost to Asus firmware mistakes across just motherboards and routers alone I could probably take a long vacation somewhere on the other side of the world.

    • rika13
    • 4 years ago

    One of the first things you learn in Cisco Network Academy when moving a device (either from a lab to production, from one department to another, or using a used device) is to reset it. Not just a reboot, but a full “kill it with hellfire” purge of all configs.

      • not@home
      • 4 years ago

      I too recommend the Ubiquity equipment. It is so much better than any consumer grade junk. I have an apartment though so I just ran cat5 through the house on the floor behind couches and other furniture. Where the cable crosses a doorway or something, I just put a thin floor mat or throw rug over it.

      • tipoo
      • 4 years ago

      Is that a true router? From the Ars article on it I thought it was just an access point, with no hardware firewall like a router.

      [url<]http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/10/review-ubiquiti-unifi-made-me-realize-how-terrible-consumer-wi-fi-gear-is/2/[/url<]

    • DaALC
    • 4 years ago

    Wait till somebody plugs in a vacuum cleaner or a dodgy Chinese power adaptor and your powerline adaptors drop of the face of the earth. No joke. I was excited for the first week of having mine, quickly grew to hate them.
    Joined the forum just to let you know this, be prepared.

    • madmanmarz
    • 4 years ago

    I did this a few years back. There is still no better way to go about this than to run a damn ethernet cable. It ain’t even that hard really.

    Out of my own laziness I tried the powerline route to an older router to serve as an AP to cover another part of the house and it worked fine, and fast…most of the time. And then one day one of the little powerline adapters took a shit. Probably because of sofla storms but who knows.

    hardwire is love, hardwire is life.

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      Recent ones are *way* better than the old ones, that barely worked at all.

      My TP-Link powerline adapters get me 185Mbit/s steady across circuits.

      • yokem55
      • 4 years ago

      [quote<]There is still no better way to go about this than to run a damn ethernet cable. It ain't even that hard really. [/quote<] I agree that real cat6 ethernet is hard to beat within a home. I wired my own home with Cat6 everywhere and it was the best networking investment I've ever made. And it isn't hard if you have all the tools and materials already, and you're familiar with crimping or punching down cat5/6 connectors. But for folks that don't have the tools (crimper, punch down tool, wire stripper, cable tester, small drywall saw, fish tape, drill, bulk cat6 cable, rj45 ends and modular jacks, faceplates, a patch panel, cutout mounts, etc.) and you've never punched down an RJ45 modular jack or crimped a connector on a bare cable before, then solutions like MoCa or Powerline ethernet totally make sense.

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 4 years ago

    For those with recent wiring or rewired houses then yes, I’d recommend them too. However for those with wiring from 70s and back, you’ll probably need to run them through power strips that condition the signal.

    Instead be a man and let that CAT-5 dangle through the house…

    🙂

      • fade2blac
      • 4 years ago

      Careful with “running then through power strips that condition the signal”. This will most likely filter out the powerline network signal. This is the reason that powerline network devices advise against having a surge protector/power strip between them and the wall. I posted more detail in another response for those that are curious.

        • wiak
        • 4 years ago

        PowerLine checklist
        1. Have good enough power cabling, if you house was wired in the 70s then dont expect best speed (this also goes for MoCA2 adapters)
        2. Be on the same circuit
        3. Be connected right into the wall (no powerstrip, surge protector!)
        4. be smart, if you are using powerline in a two story house, then put the base and other units as close as possible to each other, measure the power cable and where it goes and find out where the perfect place to put it with the shortest power cable on the floor (this might interface with 2 but if you have sort way to the fuse box/cabinet it should give you pretty okey speed non the less)

        just my checklist hope someone find it useful

      • wiak
      • 4 years ago

      i have a few CAT6 cables laying around, i almost stumble upon them when i wake up =D

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      In my experience, power strips made it worse, not better. I have a pair of Netgear PL-1200 that never gave a great experience running all the way across the house, but could reach up close to 100 mbps when they went into the right two outlets. Now they’re just kind of sitting on my desk.

    • Andrew Lauritzen
    • 4 years ago

    Awesome to hear you got it working. Indeed I love having a pair of powerline adapters around for situations like this or LANs or other impromptu setups. There’s no substitute for just being able to take a small box and plug it in anywhere and have a nice wired LAN, and it’s much more friendly to the latency and reliability requirements of gaming than is WiFi as well.

    > I do have one caveat about the power-line adapters, though. After I first plugged them in, I noticed some strange, subtle noises while sitting at my desk working. Eventually, I realized I was hearing interference caused by the power-line network doing its thing. Moving my speakers’ power plug from the wall socket to the UPS resolved the problem, but it’s possible we could encounter similar problems elsewhere over time.

    Do I get points for calling this out in advance? 🙂
    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/29075/etc?post=939148[/url<] UPS's will generally smooth out the noise in any case, and there are dedicated power conditioning units for even more sensitive stuff (like guitar amplifiers) if need be.

    • adampk17
    • 4 years ago

    Damage, since you are using the same SSID for both APs I’m curious how client roaming works?

    For me, whenever I’ve set up something like you’re mentioning, and a client moves from a strong signal from AP 1 to an area where the signal from AP 1 gets weak and AP 2 has a strong signal, the client will cling to the crappy signal from AP 1 like its life depends on it.

      • Damage
      • 4 years ago

      So far, I’ve just let devices decide for themselves what to use. I don’t really care which network they’re using as long as everything works.

      For the most part, the tablets and phones that move around a lot seem to do an OK job of switching to the RT-N66U’s networks when they’re in the spots that are worst for the primary router’s signal. I have occasionally disabled/enabled Wi-Fi to prompt a device to switch when I’ve walked upstairs, but mainly just during testing. (You can see from the N66U’s GUI which clients are connected.)

      I suspect we may have some devices that fail to select the best network and thus have connectivity problem, but so far at least, it hasn’t been an issue. If it becomes an issue, I might switch to separate SSIDs for one or both of the N66U’s wireless bands.

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      That happens with bad clients.

      No, really. The standard is to near-invisibly reconnect to an AP with a stronger signal if it can, some older phones/tablets/laptops will act stupid and hold on to the weak signal.

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 years ago

        Yeah, that behaviour irritates me immensely because it’s so frustratingly backwards and such a dumb concept to have ever programmed in the first place.

    • The Egg
    • 4 years ago

    I’ve got kindof a stupid question: Do these things have surge protection built in? If not, would connecting them to a surge protector affect their performance?

    I’d feel pretty dumb if I paid-up for UPS’s on both my main rig and home theater setup, only to fry them both via the Cat6 cable connected to unprotected powerline networking.

      • Damage
      • 4 years ago

      I don’t think they provide surge suppression.

      Then again, I don’t think a surge protector is gonna save your stuff if, say, lighting strikes. There’s a reason those products come with insurance policies.

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        Several wall plug devices at least employ some basic MOV protection on the device.

        • The Egg
        • 4 years ago

        Not a direct lightning hit, but I have recently seen a couple random surges from nowhere (incandescent bulbs went over-bright and UPS beeped). I’m actually in the market for powerline networking to my main PC, but I’d want at least some sort of protection.

        Maybe I can run the Cat6 through my UPS’s.

      • blueknigh7
      • 4 years ago

      I’ve never tested it, but all instructions say to not plug them into surge protectors or any other type of device – other than your outlet. It’s also best to use a bare outlook, but some do have “passthrough” outlets so you’re not losing a socket.

      It restricts the frequency they can use, and thereby the bandwidth – if they work at all.

        • The Egg
        • 4 years ago

        That’s what I suspected, but I’d still be interested to see what would happen. It just seems odd that this question never comes up during powerline networking discussions, as many of the same people likely spend money on power protection for their devices.

        Either way, it appears that my UPS’s on both ends have RJ45 surge protection, so that would probably be the easier route.

      • fade2blac
      • 4 years ago

      It all depends on the type of EMI filtering present in the surge suppressor/power strip. It is not always advertised, but most decent quality devices should have technical specs on at least the bandwidth and db rating of the EMI filter stage (eg. 150kHz ~100MHz, up to 75dB). 150kHz ~100MHz is not an uncommon filter band, so it will very likely reduce if not outright block the powerline network signal based on the following.

      According to [url<]http://www.homeplug.org/media/filer_public/b8/68/b86828d9-7e8a-486f-aa82-179e6e95cab5/hpav-white-paper_050818.pdf[/url<] , a white paper for the HomePlug AV standard [quote<] The Physical Layer (PHY) operates in the frequency range of 2 - 28 MHz and provides a 200 Mbps PHY channel rate and a 150 Mbps information rate." [/quote<] Another reference for HomePlug AV2, [url<]http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jece/2013/892628/[/url<] [quote<] The HomePlug AV2 OFDM parameters correspond to a system with 4096 carriers in 100 MHz, but only carriers from 1.8 to 86.13 MHz are supported for communication (3455 carriers) [/quote<]

      • TardOnPC
      • 4 years ago

      You have to plug most if not all adapters straight into the wall. There might be some surge protection but check the specific model. During a storm my powerline adapter fried. I opened it up and pieces fell out of the housing and the PCB was burnt black. Network cable and computer were fine. As others have mentioned it works faster in a newer house. If there are slight outages the adapters may reset as well. I occasionally have to unplug them and plug them back in for them to work.

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    The only benefit of going with the crazy expensive gigabit powerline adapters is when you’re using multiple end points. The “transmitter” end needs to split it’s bandwidth up to all the “client” modules.

    • Village
    • 4 years ago

    I’ve been running with 3 powerline (500BMbp) adapters to augment my network. I had to rearrange my computer/routers/etcetera locations due to lifes little additions.

    It’s not been smooth as I would like to say the least. Bad wiring/interference from wall warts is a definite and expected problem but working around it isn’t easy when you can’t just pick up and move locations of the equipment. At this stage it is really worse than when I was bridging my wireless routers. Two can see each other and report from the tool at 50mbps and the 3rd is on/off again at 9mbps. The latter doesn’t really matter since my main system doesn’t need to communicate with it. It also just occasionally just drops connections and requires me to unplug the adapter and plug it back in to get the connection again.

    So far, I’ve isolate a couple of power adapters for other devices that are the worst offenders. A WD external HDD being the worst offender. Plug the WD in and powerline fails, unplug it and it works. Moving them to decent power bars helped, and probably can do additional isolation with purchasing UPSes.

      • fade2blac
      • 4 years ago

      I might also suggest questioning things like CFL bulbs and dimmer switches. I’m not sure if LED lamps have similarly offending circuits, but the integral ballast in CFL bulbs can create a significant level of radio frequency EMI. As you already found out, switch mode power supplies (wall warts, chargers, TV’s, printers, PC’s) can unexpectedly turn your home power lines in to a hostile environment.
      Try isolating these devices behind a surge protector that has EMI filtering. Just think of how many phone changers and power adapters the average home can have plugged in at any one time. Chances are some of those are part of the problem.

        • Village
        • 4 years ago

        Yeah, moving my WD HDD offending wall wart onto the power bar worked to isolate it from causing problems. Or at least from knocking the network completely offline. I was wondering about the CFLs, but there isn’t much I can do there beyond slowly replace with higher quality units/LED maybe.

        Thing is, powerline idea is just drop in and go. Buying all these additional items to get it to work well when it doesn’t can be expensive to the point where getting someone to come in and run data lines would fix the problem and be cheaper.

        Going try and spend this weekend though isolating out some of the suspected noisier devices that are on the circuits these are.

    • anotherengineer
    • 4 years ago

    “After I first plugged them in, I noticed some strange, subtle noises while sitting at my desk working. ”

    lol you mean gaming………..don’t lie 😉

      • LostCat
      • 4 years ago

      Actually mine have a whine I don’t usually hear from equipment and has turned me off from using the things, though I found a use for them elsewhere.

    • setzer
    • 4 years ago

    Damage, you can also try and disable power saving measures on both the powerline adapter (they often have those) and see if your router is also not going into a lower power mode because of the link speed.

    By the way as you only get a maximum of 220mbps you can return those adapters (if you are still able) and switch to a pair of 600mbps adapters. It seems your endpoints do not share the same ground wire (which is the only reason to go for the 1200mbps adapters).

    In any case Powerline is indeed as plug and play as it gets.

      • southrncomfortjm
      • 4 years ago

      Can you recommend a good 600mbs set?

      • fade2blac
      • 4 years ago

      1200 Mbps MIMO is probably a good idea. I have found that the throughput efficiency of wireless and powerline networking are quite similar ( Client Data rate / PHY rate ~ 67% ). This is due to things like overhead with error correction, control signaling, encoding efficiency, etc. Therefore a quick and dirty estimate for MIMO with 2 x 600 Mbps streams would give about 2 x 400 Mbps which is not full duplex (ie. send & receive take turns) so it is really only a max ~200 Mbps in each direction. Achieving “only” 220 Mbps of effective client data throughput is not really that bad and would likely be significantly lower without AV2 MIMO-capable devices.

      I suggest careful consideration of the following info:

      [url<]http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jece/2013/892628/[/url<] [quote<]The HomePlug system is specified for in-home communication adapted to the power line channel. The in-home communications are established with Time Division Duplexing (TDD) mechanism to allow for symmetric communication between peers, as opposed to the classical access system in ADSL with two different downstream and upstream throughputs.[/quote<] [quote<] MIMO technology enables HomePlug AV2 devices to transmit and receive on any two-wire pairs within a three-wire configuration. Figure 2 shows a three-wire configuration with Line (L), Neutral (N), and Protective Earth (PE). Whereas HomePlug AV always transmits and receives on the Line-Neutral pair (port 1 in Figure 2), HomePlug AV2 modems can transmit and receive signals on the other pairs as well. Any two pairs formed by the Line, Neutral, or Protective Earth wires (i.e., L-N, L-PE, and N-PE) can be used at the transmitter. At the receiver, up to four receive ports may be used [/quote<]

    • Firestarter
    • 4 years ago

    And if powerline doesn’t work for you, you can give MoCa adapters a try if you have coax in your walls. Just plug them into your coax lines and you should be good to go! I’m very happy with the performance of my 4 MoCa 2.0 adapters, which get me a rock stable 400 Mbit/s between our PCs, the router and the HTPC

      • Rectal Prolapse
      • 4 years ago

      I have MOCA adapters too – works great – I also have a ubiquity unifi hooked up to a MoCa endpoint. Well actually they are DECA – similar to MOCA.

      Much more reliable than powerline ethernet.

      I bought them from ebay – leftover DirecTV DECA Broadband Model DCA2PR0-01 units. $25 each at the time.

        • Firestarter
        • 4 years ago

        yeah I hear many have leftover MoCa adapters from their STBs, but those are problably all MoCa 1.0. 1.0 is still very stable but you won’t get more than 90 Mbit/s out of them which might not be enough. With the new MoCa 2.0 you can easily get a very real 400 Mbit/s, file transfers between our PCs top out at about 55 Mbyte/s!

          • Rectal Prolapse
          • 4 years ago

          Which MoCa 2.0 models did you get? 55 Mbytes is pretty amazing. I think I’m getting about 90 Mbit, which is enough for the moment – but would be nice to get more!

            • Firestarter
            • 4 years ago

            I have the Teleste Echobox 2.0, which is just a MoCa 2.0 adapter with a TV out and 1 ethernet socket, no wifi or anything. I found them by accident and they were the only ones available in Europe back then, and I’m not sure if any new ones came around since then. Apparently, Actiontec has started delivering their MoCa 2.0 adapters this summer: [url<]https://www.reddit.com/r/HomeNetworking/comments/3iei9m/my_initial_impressions_of_the_actiontec_ecb6000/[/url<]

            • DrDominodog51
            • 4 years ago

            Would you recommend the Teleste? In my bedroom/office I have a coax line but no ethernet. The coax line leads to the room with my modem and router in it to make my life more convenient.

            • Firestarter
            • 4 years ago

            It works flawlessly for me, so yes I would. However, there’s also the Actiontec ECB6200 which supports linked channels, which can double the throughput to 800 Mbit/s, so if you can find those they’re probably a better choice. Also, these Echobox units have absolutely 0 configuration and monitoring as far as I have been able to find out. You plug it in and it either works or it doesn’t. So far for me though, it has always worked perfectly.

            • Rectal Prolapse
            • 4 years ago

            Wow, thanks for the info. Heh, it’s quite pricy – and even worse since I live in Canaduh – have to add 30% on top of the usual price. But I can dream. 🙂

      • wiak
      • 4 years ago

      i found this out too latest gen powerline is awesome for dead spots
      i setup Devolo dLAN 1200 AC at my parents house and its finaly rock stable for months

      @firestarter do you use cable internet?, might have some interference with cable modem/cable box?

      here is my rankings atm according to latest info about MoCA, best on top
      10gbit ethernet (RJ45 Cable)
      Gigabit ethernet (RJ45 cable)
      100mbps ethernet (RJ45 cable)
      MoCa 2.0? (cable cable)
      Powerline ethernet (power line)
      Wifi AC (wireless)
      Wifi N (wireless)
      Wifi G (wireless)
      shuffle usb harddrives around..
      snail mail

        • Firestarter
        • 4 years ago

        We have fibre to the premises here, but only get 100 Mbit/s because they won’t sell us more. You’re right about the interference, which is why they sell MoCA filters so that the signal stops at your drop, or in case of a cable modem you’ll want to do drop->modem->filter->MoCA->TV/PC/etc so that the MoCA signal doesn’t mess with your cable modem. Our TV signal runs from the fibre modem to the TV over the same coax cables, but so far that seems to be no problem.

        As for your rankings, I would put MoCA 2.0 above 100 Mbit/s ethernet and MoCA 1.0 below it, with the caveat that MoCA introduces a ping of about 3 to 4 ms which might be a problem for some applications. It does Steam In-Home streaming just fine though and that’s a latency sensitive application. For my internet connection, it’s a wash.

      • w76
      • 4 years ago

      Thanks for this whole ensuing MoCa discussion. I’ve tried PowerLine in the past, what a pain, and just a tiny bit pricey for what it does. Tried getting up in the roof trusses to scout out a plan for running ethernet, found myself cut off by insulation, 2×4 webs, duct work, etc from large areas of the house. This might be the ticket if I get frustrated by WiFi again.

      • southrncomfortjm
      • 4 years ago

      Can you recommend a good MoCa adapter. Seems like a set of these would work even better than powerlines for me.

        • Firestarter
        • 4 years ago

        Depends on what you can find. The MoCa 1.0 adapters are quite old already but it seems that they’re very dependable and deliver 90 Mbit/s, so that’s all you need you should be able to find some pretty easily. The MoCa 2.0 adapters are somewhat new and aren’t really being sold to end-users as far as I can tell. I found my Teleste Echobox 2.0 adapters by chance, they’re still being sold where I bought them (www.cablers.nl), but otherwise I haven’t seen any actually being sold

          • southrncomfortjm
          • 4 years ago

          What about something like : [url<]http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008EQ4BQG/ref=dra_a_rv_ff_fx_it_P2000_1000?tag=dradisplay-20&ascsubtag=067b7c17f6b1d8c764a0c562bf98eaf3_S&dra_hfr=1&dra_ohs=0-0[/url<]

            • Firestarter
            • 4 years ago

            Those are MoCA 1.1 adapters, but with a 100 Mbit/s ethernet interface. So even though these things can talk to eachother at rates up to 175 Mbit/s, you won’t see more than 100 Mbit/s ever. I can’t recall if I’ve seen one of these adapters with gigabit ethernet however, so I think that any other MoCA 1.1 adapter that you will find will probably have similar performance. Actiontec is definitely the big brand in the USA for this kind of stuff, so you can’t go wrong there, and from what’ve read these particular ones are extremely stable.

            • southrncomfortjm
            • 4 years ago

            Thanks bud.

            • southrncomfortjm
            • 4 years ago

            Looks like they make 2.0s as well [url<]http://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Electronics-MoCA-2-0-Adapter/dp/B013J7NUXO/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1443729092&sr=8-13&keywords=moca[/url<]

            • Firestarter
            • 4 years ago

            This is the one you want: [url<]http://amzn.com/B013J7O3X0[/url<] they support channel bonding to get north of 800 Mbit/s

    • southrncomfortjm
    • 4 years ago

    Thanks for the write up Scott! I was pondering doing the wireless bridge with my Verizon gateway and my AC66U, but will now probably just add the powerlines instead.

    • tsk
    • 4 years ago

    Networking can really be a royal pain. Glad it worked out for you Damage.

    • chuckula
    • 4 years ago

    Any bandwidth/reliability issues when electrically noisy appliances (especially anything with a motor in it) are running?

      • Damage
      • 4 years ago

      Not that I’ve noticed. Did some laundry over the weekend with no issues/complaints. Will keep using it and watching for problems, though.

        • Anovoca
        • 4 years ago

        good to hear. I would be interested in something like this but using them in an apartment building (although somewhat new) has me a bit leery.

      • ron_nelson
      • 4 years ago

      For my power-line setup, I got a big when when I put both my office UPS/powerstrips and the front-room entertainment center powerstrip on the filtered outlet built into the adapters.

      • Village
      • 4 years ago

      Yes, since I’m attempting to do the same thing at home as Damage with much less success. Wall warts have been the worst offenders I’ve notice, but not fridge/washer/dryer. I think I have a rogue device somewhere that when turns on kicks the off one of the adapters but I haven’t been able to locate it.

      I’m in an old house with dodgy wiring so I’m not really blaming the technology. Just that it isn’t guaranteed to work and it can be spotty and worse than a wireless bridge.

      • fade2blac
      • 4 years ago

      I have a cheap ATX power supply that injects a lot of EMI on the AC line just by being plugged in to the wall (ie. doesn’t matter if it is actually powered on or not). The interference is strong enough that my pair of HomePlug AV200 devices just about lose their connection. That PC has remained unplugged since I figured this out. Other than that noisy device, I haven’t had any real reliability issues in the past couple of years.

      BTW my AV200 gives me a steady 30-40 Mbps link to a remote part of my house where 2.4 GHz WiFi only manages 5-10 Mbps with occasional hiccups. Also, I just recently got what look to be the same 1200 Mbps TP-Link adapters and a quick test showed they can hit a similar 180-200-ish Mbps effective throughput between the same two rooms.

      It may be possible to block a noisy device from injecting EMI by plugging them into a decent surge suppressor that includes EMI filtering. Just remember that you cannot plug the powerline adapter itself into a filtered outlet or it may well “filter” out the powerline data signal.

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