Just how hot is Coffee Lake?

Update 10/6/2017 10:45 PM: This article originally stated that the Gigabyte Z370 Aorus Gaming 7 motherboard ships with "multi-core enhancement" enabled. The board in fact ships with the feature disabled. I deeply regret the error and have corrected the article accordingly.

Intel's Core i7-8700K has proved to be an exceptionally well-rounded CPU in our testing so far, but one potential negative has come up again and again in the other reviews I've been reading. Many reviewers have noted that the chip "runs hot," so much so that the idea even made for sub-headline news at one outlet. I was a bit confused reading these statements, because the i7-8700K didn't seem to be an exceptionally hot-running chip in my testing compared to other modern Intel CPUs. Although I  ran into a thermal limit while trying to boost voltages enough to get our chip stable under a Prime95 AVX workload, running all of the chip's AVX units at 4.8 GHz was no small feat, and we expect high temperatures as a matter of course from unmodified Intel CPUs when they're overclocked.

Still, the TR water-cooler meeting this morning produced an interesting line in the sand for whether a chip is difficult to cool: can it be held in check by Cooler Master's evergreen Hyper 212 Evo? That $30 tower remains a fine bang-for-the-buck contender among CPU heatsinks, so it's a natural baseline for establishing whether a chip is tough to keep frosty. I don't have a Hyper 212 Evo here, but I do have Cooler Master's MasterAir Pro 4, a 120-mm tower that's basically the same heatsink as a Hyper 212 Evo with a newer fan design. It was simple enough to see whether the Core i7-8700K fell on the right or wrong side of the MasterAir Pro 4's cooling power, so I popped off the 280-mm Corsair H115i that usually cools our test chips and set up the MasterAir Pro 4 in its place.

First off, it's worth defining what "hot" means in the context of the i7-8700K. Intel's Tjunction specification for this chip remains the same 100° C it's been for Skylake and Kaby Lake K-series CPUs. Hit that temperature, and the i7-8700K will begin to throttle. We obviously want to stay as far below that threshold as possible, but it establishes an upper limit for what a "bad" temperature might be for the chip.

With that in mind, I ran the Prime95 Small FFTs torture test at stock speeds to establish a baseline for the chip's thermal behavior. Prime95 hammers a chip's AVX units in a way that's meant to produce the most heat possible, well beyond what any real-world workload might generate. Gigabyte's Easy Tune utility reported that the chip was running at 4.3 GHz—its normal all-core Turbo speed—at 1.1V under this synthetic load. With the MasterAir Pro 4 on top, those clocks and voltages resulted in a CPU package temperature of 78° C, according to HWiNFO64.

Those numbers are certainly warm for a stock-clocked LGA 1151 CPU, but it's worth remembering that we're now asking the cooler to wrangle six cores and 12 threads instead of four cores and eight threads. That's entry-level high-end desktop territory, so slightly higher temps than we're used to should be par for the course. In any case, the stock-clocked i7-8700K proved perfectly happy under our Hyper 212 Evo stand-in.

Next up, I tried to run the chip with Gigabyte's "multi-core enhancement" turned on. This "enhancement" (happily left off by default, as "Auto" means in the Z370 Aorus Gaming 7's firmware) runs all six cores of our i7-8700K at the single-core Turbo Boost speed, or 4.7 GHz. We vigorously search out and disable these kinds of settings for every CPU review we do, since they're the same as overclocking. Other sites may not, and that's not ideal. Not only do these settings ruin any sense of what "stock" performance is from a given processor, they place the same demands on heatsinks as an equivalent overclock would.

I know that's stating the obvious, but we've had bad experiences with these "performance-enhancing" tweaks in the past when they've goosed many-core chips like the Core i7-6950X, and they're sometimes on by default in firmware from Gigabyte and Asus, at least. Readers and YouTube-watchers should be asking whether reviewers explicitly went to the effort to turn off these features before making sweeping conclusions about a chip's power consumption, heat production, performance, and efficiency.

We are glad that Gigabyte's Z370 firmware makes the correct choice with regard to multi-core enhancement behavior, though, and we hope other motherboard brands have followed or will follow suit.

Regardless, I fired up our system in this state and cued up Prime95 Small FFTs again. The chip proceeded to throttle on several cores with a 1.308V Vcore (a difficult figure to monitor given the plunging core clocks, but I tried). That throttling meant the chip was running into its 100° C Tjunction limit on some cores, so the motherboard's automatic voltage control is probably a tad too aggressive given my manual overclocking experience. I also tried running Blender with multi-core enhancement enabled, and while all of the cores got to around 89° C under that load, the chip didn't throttle. That result still suggests a Hyper 212 Evo-class cooler probably isn't sufficient for holding the overclocked i7-8700K in check, given how little headroom it offers.

This behavior shows why "multi-core enhancement" is undesirable: it's overclocking through and through, and it requires cooling to match. Builders who are buying heatsinks under the assumption they'll be facing all-core Turbo speeds of 4.3 GHz from the i7-8700K could be surprised if their motherboard tries to "help" by modifying Intel's factory Turbo Boost behavior. Our Gigabyte Z370 Aorus Gaming 7 test motherboard commendably ships with the feature disabled, but we'd imagine the feature could still catch both reviewers and builders alike off guard. We've been protesting this "feature" for years, and we'll continue to do so when it rears its head.

Finally, I tried the same manual overclock I achieved with our Corsair H115i liquid cooler: 5GHz with a -2 AVX offset and a dynamic Vcore in a range of 1.284V to 1.296V. Under the MasterAir Pro 4, running Prime95 caused the chip to throttle, while Blender caused it to run in the low 90° C range. Considering that my overclock was pulling another 100 MHz from the chip's AVX units with only slightly less voltage, it's not a surprise that I got similar thermal results. Under these conditions, the chip definitely exceeds the informal "difficult to cool" barrier that we drew at the beginning of this article.

For comparison, Corsair's 280-mm H115i produced a 90° C package temperature and core temperatures ranging from about 84° C to 90° C using the same settings and voltages with Prime95 Small FFTs. Blender topped out our overclocked i7-8700K at about 80° C at the package. The H115i definitely reins in the i7-8700K if you're shooting for the ability to run Prime95 for hours, as one might want to do for extreme stability testing.

These are all rough benchmarks, but at the end of the day, Coffee Lake does seem to run hotter at stock speeds than the quad-core CPUs that have come before it. That's probably as it should be: there are two more cores and four more threads to deal with under the heat spreader. Builders planning to cool the chip at stock speeds should certainly be able to get away with an inexpensive cooler like a Hyper 212 Evo, but those hoping for a Prime95-stable overclock without a delid and repaste need to budget for a substantial liquid cooler. In that sense, the i7-8700K is no different than the Core i7-6700K and Core i7-7700K before it, and it's definitely harder to cool than AMD's Ryzen CPUs. AMD's chips all boast soldered heat spreaders, and metal is undeniably a better thermal transfer medium than paste.

The question of a paste-based TIM versus solder is almost certainly the largest variable in keeping Coffee Lake on ice relative to Ryzen CPUs, but I think there's more to it than that. First off, it's worth noting that Intel's implementation of AVX in the Skylake microarchitecture offers two 256-bit vector units per core, while the Zen architecture only offers two 128-bit-wide units per core. Skylake also has wider data paths that need more wires to implement, and that presumably means higher power usage when moving data around. When we run an intense AVX workload like Prime95, then, the stress test should unsurprisingly do more work, consume more power, and ultimately generate more heat on a chip that's capable of sustaining twice the SIMD throughput. It's certainly easier to cool an overclocked Ryzen CPU thanks to its soldered heat spreader, but it's hard to argue that one isn't getting more out of overclocking the Core i7-8700K in many tasks despite its higher temperatures. That fact should be part of the value consideration when setting out to overclock either chip.

Whether Intel is doing the best it can to support overclocking on its chips through its thermal interface material of choice is another question, and it's one that's raged since Ivy Bridge and coursed through Devil's Canyon. Coffee Lake doesn't do anything to quench the flames. Folks seeking the lowest load temperatures and highest possible overclocking headroom from Coffee Lake chips will likely need to reach for liquid-metal TIM, their delid tool of choice, and a hefty liquid cooler or giant tower heatsink. At stock speeds, though, the i7-8700K should be fine with the same Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo that's graced countless systems. Just be sure to terminate any multi-core enhancement settings in your motherboard's firmware with extreme prejudice first.

Comments closed
    • ndsinister
    • 2 years ago

    Thank you for an awesome review!

    I’ve got an old Hyper 212 Evo which I’m planning to use with 8700K and what I was specifically interested to know and couldn’t find in the review is the noise level it produces on load(no OC)/idle.

    It would be great if you happen to have this info. Most importantly, I’d like to know if it’s going to be quiet when idle.

    Thanks once again!

    • watzupken
    • 2 years ago

    I feel it will be good to try and undervolt this processor instead since it seems quite toasty to me. Granted that the benchmarks may not accurately represent real world usage, but still I wonder how hot will it get during summer or in hotter tropical countries using just an air cooler like the Hyper 212 Evo. It may not hit the TJunction, but I worry for the longevity of the chip in the long run with this much heat.

      • IGTrading
      • 2 years ago

      In the light of the latest revelations, I hope Jeff would give us his opinion on the test results.

      As it turns out, Intel apparently has cheated and Coffee Lake comes with absolutely NO IPC improvements over Kaby Lake and NO power improvements as well.

      Source : [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O98qP-FsIWo[/url<] And independent experts confirm the issue and the LOWER TRUE SCORES shown by Coffee Lake. Source : [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0Oeme4V2bM[/url<] By not stating the TURBO frequencies, Intel leaves everything to guesswork. As it was correctly pointed out, when the max TURBO is not guaranteed, you can't be sure of what performance you will get with your particular chip. Especially in situations like the i5 8400, you have no idea if the chip will run at 2.9 GHz Turbo, or 3 GHz or 3.8 GHz. When cheaper motherboards will enter the market, we don't know if the benchmark results will be just as high, nor if we can expect ALL i5 8400 chip to reach 3.8 GHz Turbo on a regular basis. It would be really useful to hear Jeff's take on this.

    • yenic
    • 2 years ago

    No need for editorials making excuses for Intel and the 8700K. 90C+ on water. Same power usage as a 1950X on load but missing 20 threads. They’ve sacrificed power and heat concerns to reach the performance crown.
    Bottom line is that it’s Intel’s JOB to ensure this chip runs cool and sips power while performing well. They have failed to do so.

    The 7700K is better than the 8700K for gaming once you consider power/heat. And the X99 platform is superior to the X299 chips across the board, on all metrics except AVX512 which is useless.

    This launch is the very heralded for Intel and it’s undeserved. I’m recommending Ryzen for most people and Threadripper for those who can utilize the power. Intel is in total disarray, and here come the ARM64 Windows10 laptops. If it offends you to read this comment, boy, are you in for a fun ride with your pals at Intel.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      – 90C+ on water.

      Under a Prime95 Small FFTs [i<]overclock[/i<]; no different than the Core i7-7700K - Bottom line is that it's Intel's JOB to ensure this chip runs cool and sips power while performing well. They have failed to do so. It does just fine at stock speeds, as my testing with the tower cooler demonstrates. Overclocking has always been and will always be in the builder's own hands.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    I’ve seen at least a few other responses (don’t remember in response to what) where people had claimed the TIM isn’t the only issue.

    Is the special solider (can’t use the regular stuff) fails over time?
    Is it the height of the heat spreader?
    Does delidding cause the spreader to be too close?

    These are all things I’ve seen in responses to comments that other gerbils have made with well written articles linked as references. To be blunt, I’m a little irritated that some gerbils feel like calling out other gerbils but not the head gerbil. I’d like to see an informed debate on the issue, possibly with some more testing by TR.

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    Somebody should figure out a working fluid for heat pipe coolers suitable for a heat sink with a cold end that in addition to the usual air heat exchange fins; has a heat exchange plate on top. Then when you want to overclock, you can set a chunk of dry ice on the plate and go to town with -80C at the cold end.

      • Freon
      • 2 years ago

      I don’t understand the use case of switching back and forth but having an unwillingness to change the heatsink. LN2/CO2 is only going to last a few minutes anyway, purely for benchmark runs in a very narrow use case for internet points. No gamer is going to start a gaming session and tend your CO2/LN2 while you try to play games in between rounds of CS or PUBG or whatever.

        • Mr Bill
        • 2 years ago

        I was suggesting, primarily for benchmarking. A pound of dry ice sublimes to gas and absorbs ~241 BTU/LB. So 1000 BTU per hour is about 293 Whr. So a pound could give you -78C for about 15 minutes at 293W dissipation.

    • abiprithtr
    • 2 years ago

    When I saw the first image of this article from my mobile screen in low resolution, I swear I thought I was seeing a black coffee mug on a motherboard, as if it was being heated by the Intel CPU below it.

    I thought “clever picture!”… Until I looked at the same image from my desktop.

    Time to purchase a bigger-screen mobile.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 2 years ago

      I had thought I saw something similar on my phone, too. You’re not alone.

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      I thought I saw that also in the side bar when I first noticed it.

    • Heiwashin
    • 2 years ago

    Half the countries media participating in poor and fake news practices, Jeff disembowels himself for a mostly insignificant error about something being on or off. This be a funny place.

      • shank15217
      • 2 years ago

      Heiwashin is fake news

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      Hey, if we can’t care deeply about the small things…

    • unitedflow37
    • 2 years ago

    I have the evo 212 and just got the i7 8700 and now I’m just waiting on my motherboard. Will this cooler be enough for gaming with turbo boost? And what’s the difference between turbo boost and multi-core enhancement?

      • ermo
      • 2 years ago

      Multi-core enchancement takes the highest (i.e. single-core) turbo-boost clock and applies it to ALL cores. For the i7 8700 (non-K), the single-core turbo-boost clock is 4.6 GHz.

      So instead of a stock all-core clock speed of, say, 4.2 GHz, you get a multi-core enhancement all-core clock speed of 4.6 GHz on the i7 8700 (non-K) for as long as your cooler can keep the temperatures in check IIUC.

    • bhtooefr
    • 2 years ago

    What was ambient temperature in the test environment? (Deltas are more important than actual temperatures, until you hit Tjunction.)

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      It varies, but I’d venture 74° F – 76° F (23.3° C – 24.4° C) in the past week.

        • watzupken
        • 2 years ago

        The test ambient temps are quite low. During summers or in hot countries, the temps is likely to hit critical level.

    • ermo
    • 2 years ago

    @Jeff:

    Have you tried using the Intel Burn Test tool? It is Linpack-based and runs even hotter than Prime 95 in my experience.

    For reference, my delidded i7 3770k running at 4.5GHz@1.3V under an Arctic Freezer i33 Plus tops out at 75 degrees Celsius in Intel Burn Test “Maximum” Stress Level, whereas it reaches only 69 degrees Celsius during Prime 95 on the “Max Heat” benchmark setting.

    While gaming, it stays under 60 degrees Celsius.

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      Linpack is definitely a great way to burn as much power as possible.

      • watzupken
      • 2 years ago

      I don’t know if it is a realistic result. Sure you may see a shockingly hot processor as a result, but in actual usage, not everyone will load the processor in such a unrealistic manner.

        • pogsnet1
        • 2 years ago

        Mining on CPU will make all the available power at use

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    LOL 😉 for a second there, I thought that was a mug of coffee on the CPU and not a cooler.

    (in the tiny picture in the right side bar)

    • strangerguy
    • 2 years ago

    Definitely not as cold as Ice Lake.

    *runs away*

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      Iced Coffee Lake?

      • watzupken
      • 2 years ago

      I am unsure if Ice Lake will run as cool as it sounds. Considering that Intel can’t care about their top end chip and using the same TIM, how much more will you expect them to care for the mainstream chips. It is a problem that have plague them since the start of Ivy Bridge days.

    • blazer_123
    • 2 years ago

    Excellent review. I had no idea the motherboards automatically OC’d by default.

    I also liked how you used an entry level aftermarket cooler to test this.

    Well done!

      • HERETIC
      • 2 years ago

      Don’t let the price of the 212 fool you.
      I consider TX3/103 as “entry level”
      Have a Ivy 3570K @ 4.2 with a 212 and running Handbrake stays under 60C.
      Thro only a mild OC it’s 800 above base freq and 400 above single core boost.

      The biggest problem with modern(Intel)CPU’s is getting the heat from the
      die to the heatspreader………………………

    • Firestarter
    • 2 years ago

    gamers nexus found a 20+ degrees centigrade difference between stock and delidded, OCed on air with the worst benchmark they had. 20 degrees most definitely would make a difference in what speeds the CPU can achieve, or if nothing else at least the CPU should consume less power when it’s cooler

      • Meadows
      • 2 years ago

      That’s insane. Intel might as well admit to shipping defective packages.

        • Firestarter
        • 2 years ago

        that was only the most extreme case though, with overclocking. At lower speeds the difference was “only” about 10C. I still think its crummy given how many laymen with probably get throttling during games with marginal cooling that could have been avoided with better TIM

      • jihadjoe
      • 2 years ago

      IIRC de8auer reported in a video that they found this down to having a small gap between the die and the IHS. They delidded a chip, milled the bottom edges of the IHS down just a tiny bit, put it back using plain ol’ TIM and found huge temperature delta vs stock.

        • juzz86
        • 2 years ago

        This is correct, and that’s why it works. There’s too much sealant around the IHS attaching surface, and it ‘lifts’ it off the die a bit. TIM has to bridge a wide gap – is less effective.

        I had my 7700K de-lidded (the ‘crack’ scares the pants off me, every time – yuck) and it’s been good for 23C at my daily 5GHz and ambients. Supremely happy with the end result, and despite having liquid metal TIM in there even regular ol’ grey goop gives you 15C or so.

          • IGTrading
          • 2 years ago

          That’s amazing.

          So your average temps went don’t 23C just from replacing the TIM ?

          May I ask what cooler are you using ?

            • Voldenuit
            • 2 years ago

            I’m running a delidded 4790K @ 4.6 GHz w CoolLaboratory Liquid Ultra and a 240mm Coolermaster Master Liquid CLC, getting 60C w Prime95 Blend. Unfortunately, I did not test pre-and post delidding temps as I was running out of TIM*, but from what I’ve read, a similar setup without de-lid would probably be in the 70-80C range. A 15-20C drop from delidding seems to be the target goal for most delidders online, so I’d believe a 23C result from juzz86. Another factor is that I’m running variable fan and pump speed using mobo speed controls, so it’s harder to pin down operating temps.

            * I’d used some of the TIM to replace the stock paste on my 1080Ti.

            • Pettytheft
            • 2 years ago

            It’s right. I run a delidded 6600k with a H115i @ 4.8Ghz and it’s in the low 50’s during the stress test. Before delidding I could only get 4.6Ghz with temps in the high 60’s.

            • juzz86
            • 2 years ago

            I’m not sure why you were down-voted mate – they’re legitimate questions.

            Yes. I dropped from ~72C at stock clocks in ARK (just a game, no stress-testing), to ~48C at 5GHz in the very same – my CPU was capable of 5GHz at a very slight increase over stock voltage though – which has helped a lot. The process bundles a TIM replacement with an IHS re-seat, and the combination of the two produces the result. The TIM used was Thermal Grizzly’s Conduconaut, a liquid-metal TIM.

            The bloke who did it for me put a thread together on OCAU [url=http://forums.overclockers.com.au/showthread.php?t=1228633<]here[/url<]. Worth a quick look. I run a custom water loop under a 420 radiator. The CPU is attached to the block with generic white paste. I am expecting another couple of Degrees out of it when my good Shin-Etsu paste arrives.

            • Firestarter
            • 2 years ago

            he’s being downvoted for his fanboyism in other discussions

            • juzz86
            • 2 years ago

            Cheers mate, ta.

        • psuedonymous
        • 2 years ago

        This has been known to be the case for many CPU generations, since Ivy Bridge (though the ‘bad TIM’ meme fails to die). [url=https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/delidded-my-i7-3770k-loaded-temperatures-drop-by-20%C2%B0c-at-4-7ghz.2261855/page-23#post-34053183<]2012-era Anandtech thread with testing here[/url<]. Sadly photobucket has killed the images, but the [url=https://i.imgur.com/ekKFlXb.jpg<]key graph is rehosted here[/url<]. ::EDIT:: the reason for the gap is to prevent damage to the die form IHS displacement. If the IHS is in contact with the die (or with too small a gap), uneven pressure can extremely easily concentrate at and crack the corner. Not an issue with a soldered IHS as the solder mechancially distributes the load, but if the die is [url=http://overclocking.guide/the-truth-about-cpu-soldering/<]too small to solder[/url<] that's not an option.

          • xeridea
          • 2 years ago

          Soldiering can be an issue on small cores, you may start to get cracks after 200+ extreme thermal cycles (like liquid nitrogen, then sauna, over and over. It is highly unlikely any non extreme OC use would get this, and there are plenty of other soldiered small dies. Intel even uses TIM on X299 chips, which are hardly “small”.

          • Firestarter
          • 2 years ago

          interesting article, thanks for linking it!

        • Pholostan
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, the CPUs are binned after the IHS is in place. Ofc Intel try to get the IHS on “properly”, variations do apply though.

      • IGTrading
      • 2 years ago

      The main problem is that the user doesn’t actually get much for his investment into the new CPU and the much more expensive motherboard.

      The 8700K excels in some particular tasks and even mops the floor with Ryzen in Adobe or other specially Intel-optimized application.

      But when you test multiple productivity apps like Cinebench, Blender, Encryption, Video Conversion etc. the AMD Ryzen 1800X comes on top with less power consumption and lower temps.

      Even in gaming, where Intel is “king” by significant margins between 5% to 15% or more, everything gets reduced to less than 1% if we test in 4K.

      Since more and more screens come now with lower prices and 4K resolution, it is reasonable to believe 4K gaming will be the enthusiast’s main dish in the next year.

      The way it looks now :

      -power consumption is lower on AMD’s Ryzen solution

      -productivity performance is also leaning AMD’s way in most cases

      – 4K gaming is pretty much the same

      – AMD’s platform is more affordable and guarantees longevity and upgrade-ability

      – most if not all AMD Ryzen buyers have a guaranteed 12nm upgrade coming in spring

      So what would be the reason to even bother with Coffee Lake ?!

      To use hot, unreliable Intel chips on an expensive motherboard and struggle to get a 6% overclock ?!

      Even if we go for more attractive option like the 8350K, we find out that the chip is always slower than AMD’s Ryzen 1500, consumes way more power and needs a very expensive motherboard.

      Some would say : “Wait, but 8350K is an overclocking wonder” … and then you’re hit by 95 degrees Celsius temperatures, the cost of the expensive motherboard, the cost of the expensive cooler and a HUMONGOUS 40% higher power consumption when overclocking.

      TechSpot’s new 8350K review seems to clearly demonstrate this : [url<]https://www.techspot.com/review/1499-intel-core-i3-8100-i3-8350K/page5.html[/url<] Plus if you just take the AMD Ryzen 1500X to 3.9 or 4 GHz you get better performance on the standard cooler, with less power consumption, on a more affordable motherboard with guaranteed upgrade options. Other than special Intel-optimized use cases scenarios, a regular user or gamer would be hard pressed to find a reasonable explanation for spending more money on the new Coffee Lake, risking being screwed on the upgrade options, risk the unreliability that comes with a hot CPU that runs at 90 degree Celsius. It is my personal opinion that the only popular scenario would be gamers that prefer gaming in FullHD and have no plans for 4K gaming. There Intel's Coffee Lake clearly leaves ANY AMD solution behind, no matter if it's the classic Ryzen or the Threadripper. Later EDIT : A day later, lo and behold, Jeff posts a professionally done technical update that proves my point [url<]https://techreport.com/news/32666/revisiting-the-power-consumption-and-efficiency-of-intel-core-i7-8700k[/url<] 🙂 Thanks for the down votes 😉

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      God, Intel. If the TIM and/or gaps are that bad, solder those puppies.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    Intel pls solder, thx.

      • September
      • 2 years ago

      Yes, K = solder. Make it so.

      • TwoEars
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, just make it a “KS” model or something. I’ll throw another $20 your way to avoid the hassle of a delid and to keep the factory warranty intact if that’s what it takes. You cheap bastards.

      • Beahmont
      • 2 years ago

      You can’t solder a chip this small with a substrate this thin.

      [url<]https://overclocking.guide/the-truth-about-cpu-soldering/[/url<] What you should be complaining about anyway, isn't the solder. It's the IHS attachment process that's screwed up and has been for years. That's why delidding and reattachment does something in the first place.

        • jihadjoe
        • 2 years ago

        +1 Informative

        Excellent read. I learned something new today.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        AKA – they could do it, but they won’t, because they want to save money on the substrate.

      • Gadoran
      • 2 years ago

      Solder a chip is pretty expensive, moreover is risky too and we have some dies that fail, this is a great concern in a situation of strange prices: $X on the price list, $X/3 to the OEMs.
      We all know Ryzen is not a good economic affair for AMD, they barely can stay on the market and their profit on these SKUs is very weak.

      I have suspect future APUs will are not soldered anymore, for obvious reasons.

      • Ruiner
      • 2 years ago

      After so many tic-tocs since Ivy, it’s pretty clear that the IHS is Intel’s ‘warranty void if removed’ sticker.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        It would be awesome if they didn’t put the sticker right in the way of your new CPU’s business end though.

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