How much does screen size matter in comparing Ryzen Mobile and Kaby Lake-R battery life?

 As we've continued testing AMD's Ryzen 5 2500U APU over the past few days, we've been confronted with the problem of comparing battery life across laptops with different screen sizes. Many readers suggested that I should take each machine's internal display out of the picture by hooking them up to external monitors. While I wanted to get real-world battery-life testing out of the way first, I can certainly appreciate the elegance of leveling the playing field that way. Now we have.

Before we get too deeply into these results, I want to point out loudly and clearly that these numbers are not and will never be representative of real-world performance. Laptop users will nearly always be running the internal displays of their systems when they're on battery, and removing that major source of power draw from a mobile computer is an entirely synthetic and artificial way to run a battery life test. We're also still testing two different vendor implementations of different SoCs, and it's possible that Acer's engineers might have some kind of magic that HP's don't (or vice versa). Still, for folks curious about platform performance and efficiency, rather than the more real-world system performance tests we would typically conduct, these results might prove interesting.

To give this approach a try, I connected both the Envy x360 and the MX150-powered Acer Swift 3 to 2560×1440 external monitors running at 60 Hz using each machine's HDMI output. I then configured each system to show a display output on the external monitor only and confirmed that both laptops' internal displays were 100% off. After those preparations, I ran our TR Browserbench web-browsing test until each machine automatically shut off at 5% battery before recording their run times.

As we'd expect, both machines' battery life benefits from not having to power an internal monitor. Counter to our expectations, though, the Envy x360 doesn't actually seem to spend a great deal of its power budget on running its screen. The Envy gained only 53 minutes, or 15%, more web-browsing time than when it didn't have to drive its internal monitor. The MX150-powered Acer, on the other hand, gained a whopping five hours of battery life when we removed its screen from the picture. I was so astounded by that result that I retested the Envy to ensure that a background process or other anomaly wasn't affecting battery life, but the HP machine repeated its first performance.

We can take battery capacity out of the efficiency picture for this light workload by dividing minutes of run time by the capacity of the battery in watt-hours. This approach gives us a normalized "minutes per watt-hour" figure that should be comparable across our two test systems. HWiNFO64 reports that the Envy x360 has a 54.8 Wh battery, and since it's brand-new, a full charge tops up that battery completely. Using the technique described above, we get 7.8 minutes of run time per watt hour from the HP system.

The Acer Swift 3 I got from Intel appears to have been a test mule at some point in its life. HWiNFO64 reports that the Swift 3 has already lost 10% of its battery capacity, from 50.7 Wh when it was new to 45.7 Wh now. In this measure of efficiency, though, that capacity decrease actually helps the Swift 3. The system posts a jaw-dropping 19 minutes of run time per watt-hour for light web browsing, or a 2.4-times-better result.

Although this is a staggering difference, I emphasize that it's not representative of performance in the real world. If we don't remove the display from the picture, the Optimus-equipped Swift 3 only posted nine and a half hours of run time in our i5-8250U review, or only about half again as long as the Envy's six hours and 12 minutes. If we drop the MX150 from the picture, the IGP-only Swift 3s and their 10.5 hours of battery only run 67% longer than the Envy. Those are only rough assessments of platform potential, given that we aren't normalizing for battery capacity or screen size. Still, Ryzen Mobile systems might have a ways to go to catch Intel in the battery life race. The blue team has been obsessed with mobile power management for years, and technologies like Speed Shift are just the latest and most visible results of those efforts.

In any case, it's clear that there's a lot of moving parts behind the battery life of these systems. I've repeatedly cautioned that it's early days for both drivers and firmware for the Ryzen 5 2500U, and it's possible that future refinements will close this gap somewhat. Benchmarking a similar Intel-powered system from HP might also help even the field, given my research in my first examination of the Ryzen-powered Envy x360's battery life. (If you'd like to help with that project, throw us a few bucks, eh?) Still, if you favor battery-sipping longevity over convertible versatility and raw performance, it seems like the Envy x360 requires a compromise that our GeForce-powered Acer Swift 3 doesn't. Stay tuned for more battery-life testing soon.

Comments closed
    • ihack13
    • 2 years ago

    @Jeff Kampman

    When Ryzen was released the biggest improvement was to go with higher clocked RAM.
    This was partially or mostly due to the bottleneck between the CCX.
    Not sure how much of an improvement we could see on Raven Ridge. (edit: since it only has a single CCX)
    But I think its worth to go for it and test it.

    Secondly, the Vega should definitely profit from faster DDR4 modules.

    So if the first case is true. Then CPU and GPU will highly profit from only one upgrade. Two birds with a stone.
    Would be nice if you could test this.

    • jihadjoe
    • 2 years ago

    Laptopmag has an apples-to-apples comparison of Kaby Lake-R+MX150 and Raven Ridge, having got the HP x360 in both flavors. With both machines set so that their screens are outputting 100 nits, Kaby Lake-R + MX150 did 5:49, while Raven Ridge managed 5:11.

    [url<]https://www.laptopmag.com/reviews/laptops/hp-envy-x360-15t[/url<] [quote<]The Laptop Mag Battery Test (web surfing at 100 nits) drained the Intel model of its charge in 5 hours and 49 minutes, while the AMD model hit empty after 5 hours and 11 minutes. [/quote<] So Raven Ridge isn't nearly as bad as the Acer to HP comparison here would have us believe.

      • mczak
      • 2 years ago

      That’s more what I’d expect indeed.
      Albeit it looks like the two compared notebooks still had different displays (the difference in max brightness looks too big to be ordinary variation). Though I’d guess power draw of the panels would still be similar.

      • mtruchado
      • 2 years ago

      So this means that basically kaby lake-R got 40 minutes advantage, with the drivers/bios for the Ryzen yet at a very early stage, not bad.

      I wasn’t expecting Ryzen to beat intel, let’s be honest, Intel has a lot of experience in the laptop market and was dominating It for a very long time, so they got plenty of ideas and implementations about how to increase the power efficiency.

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      On the contrary, Raven Ridge IS as bad as the Acer to HP comparison shows. What everyone would like to know is if there will be a Ryzen Mobile laptop AS GOOD as the Acer for battery life in a similar form factor.

    • pluscard
    • 2 years ago

    Ok, so I have only owned this notebook for 24 hrs, just long enough to do the setup, windows updates, and disable mcaffee & other bloatware. I made sure it was charged to 100% overnight. After messing with it for 30 mins, it still shows 100% battery remaining! Why cant my iphone do that? Btw its smoking fast and was only $100 more than the now $200 discounted i-5 version!

      • Airmantharp
      • 2 years ago

      If it still shows 100% after 30 minutes, it’s lying to you…

      [and it’s not really telling you whether battery performance is good or bad, which is a problem!]

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      My iPad (Air 2) sits at 100% for about the first half hour of browsing or movie watching before starting to decline. A bit like the fuel gauge in a Japanese car. I would rather a nice linear drop (like the fuel gauge in my Ford).

    • Unknown-Error
    • 2 years ago

    OOUUCH!

    • wow&wow
    • 2 years ago

    The results: Acer’s design is better than than HP’s in achieving longer battery life.

    Why not just comparing HP Envy x360 with Intel inside and AMD inside?

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      TR only purchased the AMD model. But Bumper posted this link in the other thread…
      [quote<]so apparently it is the HP model that's the problem. using the same model the amd and intel version are only separated by 38 minutes in their battery test. [url<]https://www.laptopmag.com/reviews/laptops/hp-envy-x360-15t[/url<] on a side note... someone disparaged me about Lenovo efficiency in a previous thread.. damn look how well my yoga 720 does in this review. best battery life...[/quote<]

    • DancinJack
    • 2 years ago

    Some really good content between the 8th gen mobiles and Raven Ridge. Good work mates.

    • yeeeeman
    • 2 years ago

    This laptop is just the first iteration of Ryzen Mobile so I wouldn’t draw too many conclusions from it. Notebookcheck.net tested the same laptop and it scores 100 minutes lower than HP spectre (Intel 8250U) so it is not that bad.
    We don’t know if this laptop is hardware limited in its power saving features or it just needs some BIOS/software tweaks. In any case, from what we’ve seen, Ryzen can be very power frugal and the only component I suspect is the Vega GPU which as we know is built for compute, not for low power graphics.

    • dragosmp
    • 2 years ago

    Great stuff, I appreciate creative tinkering.

    I’m sure this has been answered, but to contribute, paypal or patreon could become options?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      If you want to support us, putting middlemen with overhead to pay (well above and beyond transaction fees) between us and your money isn’t helpful.

      [url=https://techreport.com/subscriptions.x<]Our subs system[/url<] has received zero security complaints over its lifetime (when it generates user complaints at all) and it's really not difficult to use. We built that system from the ground up for our specific platform and it really is the best way to support us if you're so inclined. (also please, please just whitelist us in your adblocker if you do nothing else)

      • DancinJack
      • 2 years ago

      Maybe visit this link: [url<]https://techreport.com/subscriptions.x[/url<]

    • hashhakaj
    • 2 years ago

    Interesting test. As I expected that AMD has poor running in battery when browsing internet. I mean open a text page with fixed images.

    That’s normal. In web browsing, the Intel Cores can manage and Intel iGPU is active, has less power, and Nvidia is on idle.

    While AMD Ryzen has classical CPU and all their cores are active . and the Vega iGPU is always active. So, Vega iGPU, is close to Nvidia GPU which consumes more power than Intel iGPU.

    So, for whom who use Ryzen mobile for web browsing on the go is really disappointing

    • woofcpu
    • 2 years ago

    I’d be curious to see what frequency the CPU is running at. You could change the windows power plan and set the CPU power to 0% min and 0% max which will force it to remain at its lowest frequency (assuming drivers are working properly). This would indicate what the lowest frequency the CPU is capable of running and allow you to see if the default power plan ever lets it get that low. I can’t remember if the default power plan on my hp laptop even let it get to its idle frequency with the default balanced power plan. Great work so far! It’s nice to see someone actually reviewing Ryzen mobile.

    • GAMER4000
    • 2 years ago

    Sadly until you equalise the systems we cannot say for sure what is happening:

    [url<]http://store.hp.com/us/en/pdp/hp-envy-x360-convertible-laptop-15z-touch-1za07av-1[/url<] [url<]http://store.hp.com/us/en/pdp/hp-envy-x360-convertible-laptop-15t-1za23av-1[/url<] Everything is the same in both versions,except the CPU. How about you ask HP to send you the Intel version - I am sure they wouldn't mind you testing both versions of the X360!

    • Bumper
    • 2 years ago

    this isn’t a battle… it’s a massacre.

    good call on powering off the screens. I enjoyed the included minutes per watt-hour too.

    either hp sucks or ryzen mobile is a fail.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      Oh, we don’t have to live in either-or land.

        • Bumper
        • 2 years ago

        The last hp laptop I owned was in 2011. It is amd llano based and a good laptop and still runs. Since then I’ve owned two Toshiba’s and a Lenovo. The Lenovo (skylake) is by far the best. Even going back before the hp to the multiple Dell’s I owned, the quality of the Lenovo is tops. Though laptops have improved so that’s probably not a fair comparison.

        Before Lenovo bought ibms line of products, many people told me those laptops were the best. I didnt like the little red trackpoint so I never bought one.

          • DavidC1
          • 2 years ago

          The Lenovo systems don’t seem to be top notch in the efficiency department. Their Yoga 3 line of laptops required a hefty battery only to deliver middling battery life. HP isn’t that good either. The XPS Ultrabooks from Dell are top notch.

          Asus and Acer are decent for platform efficiency.

            • Bumper
            • 2 years ago

            Perhaps you’re right. I don’t own the yoga 3 so I can’t speak of any personal experience with that laptop. I own the 720 and a quick Google search turns up generally positive reviews. YMMV.

            The last two Dell’s I owned had shoddy power ports that were cheaply soldered and broke after about 2 years. Inspirons.

      • dragosmp
      • 2 years ago

      It would be a fail if it were priced the same.

      Would you not appreciate a 500$ Ryzen5 laptop that gives 80% of the perofrmance and battery life of a 1000$ Core i5+MX150? Not sure this is something we’ll see, but if we would I know what the right choice is for me

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]Would you not appreciate a 500$ Ryzen5 laptop that gives 80% of the perofrmance and battery life of a 1000$ Core i5+MX150? [/quote<] Sure, but I'd appreciate an i9 7960X at about $799 even more. It's just not happening. Given the actual prices of these parts the Intel system with the MX-150 is basically the same price or even cheaper than the Ryzen model when you factor in that the Ryzen comes with a traditional spinning disk by default. Here's the on-sale price of $720 right here: [url<]https://www.amazon.com/Acer-i5-8250U-NVIDIA-GeForce-SF314-52G-55WQ/dp/B0746P25QX/ref=as_at?creativeASIN=B0746P25QX&linkCode=w61&imprToken=E-P-V5YSkifpxj3swYjJIQ&slotNum=0&tag=techreport09-20[/url<] TR's own review quotes the Envy 360 at $750.

          • thx1138r
          • 2 years ago

          HP’s official site has this laptop for $750, whereas the intel equivalent is $870. Although the Intel very is on special offer of 700 at the moment.

          Unfortunately the Intel version is also saddled with poor battery life and a bad screen:
          [url<]https://www.laptopmag.com/reviews/laptops/hp-envy-x360-15t[/url<] I wouldn't get either.

            • pluscard
            • 2 years ago

            Bestbuy has the I-5 version $200 off, for those who don’t appreciate performance…

    • ET3D
    • 2 years ago

    First of all, well done! Nice method of taking the screen out of the equation.

    I would, however, love to see how things compare when under load, for example when running a game. I’d like to know if the Ryzen suffers from bad idle optimisation or if it takes too much power across the board. Would be interested in such a comparison to both the MX150 and Intel integrated.

    As is, the situation doesn’t look that good.

      • smilingcrow
      • 2 years ago

      Even using a $10 power meter you can measure the idle and load power consumption figures.
      The load figures can be heavily influenced by the cooling solution as that can impact how high the turbo boost can go.
      Equally, different manufactures can use drastically different thermal cut-off points as a ceiling so when you add those things together it leaves a massive range for performance and therefore power consumption.
      All that leaves a lot of data to monitor and Notebookcheck are my go to site for laptop reviews. They’re the Mercedes Benz of laptop review sites; they are German also I think.

        • ET3D
        • 2 years ago

        All true, but it’s still valuable to test gaming. If a 2500U takes more power than an Intel + MX 150, that would certainly look bad, no matter what cut-off point is used. The “massive range” you talk about isn’t really that massive. It’s much easier to extrapolate with more data points.

    • Chrispy_
    • 2 years ago

    I’m willing to bet that the majority of this terrible result lies with HP’s BIOS.

    HP laptops are generally disappointing when it comes to battery life, didn’t you say that another review of the Intel-equipped Envy x360 also had barely 6h of battery, similar to your Ryzen model?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      The firmware might be one source of trouble. I’m hoping I can point that out so resources get pointed at it and it gets fixed.

      • DavidC1
      • 2 years ago

      If you look at Ryzen Mobile presentation, they haven’t done a groundbreaking change in terms of power management. For Intel, that significant change has happened with Haswell generation. AMD is still in the pre-Haswell era.

      I’m not talking about TDP, don’t be confused with that. There are systems that have low power in idle, average, and load, and still doesn’t do well in battery life. The ability to reach such states quickly in real world usage is what determines battery life.

      The no-screen result shows Intel’s effort put into the low power space, even better, because screens in Laptops happen to be a big contributor to power consumption in the low usage scenario. Skylake actually regressed in the department, because they took out the FiVR. I’m expecting nice gains to be had with Cannonlake and later platforms because it will have iVR again.

      Not to mention, even Intel needs to do much more work in reducing platform power further, to be in line with their Atom platforms, and thus ARM.

        • mczak
        • 2 years ago

        AMD had quite some slides in their presentation of mobile ryzen wrt power management. Among them faster exit of low power states and such stuff compared to Bristol Ridge.
        I don’t quite know how fast they can enter/exit these states (and how exactly they compare to intel there), but I don’t see any proof that they are in “pre-haswell” era compared to intel neither.

        So I’ve got some hope that things can be improved with a better bios – because indeed these results now are quite terrible. Somewhat worse than intel would be ok imho, but more than twice the average power draw in light loads is not.

          • DavidC1
          • 2 years ago

          You should go back on the Haswell power management articles again. Ever since then the little gap in battery life has widened to a chasm. Haswell was the generation where a normal 10% generational improvement turned into 50-70%.

          The warning flag was when on their presentations they were only claiming 20% increase in battery over Bristol Ridge. They were also claiming Bristol Ridge can achieve 12 hours using a 50WHr battery, but none of the systems you can buy do so.

          Beyond that, Intel applied what they learned from making mobile oriented Atom chips into Laptops to further lower power.

          More things change, more stays the same. AMD retains the graphics advantage and Intel retains the mobile advantage, in this case battery life.

          “Somewhat worse than intel would be ok imho, but more than twice the average power draw in light loads is not.”

          The display off tests exaggerate the advantage, but in reality the differences won’t be as big. You can’t use the system with the display off.

    • Waco
    • 2 years ago

    Based on what we’ve seen so far of Ryzen, this is still surprising to me. Firmware and GPU driver updates hopefully make things far better…

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    My own laptop only runs its NVIDIA 1060 when its actually gaming. It defaults to the IGP for everything else. So, somebody (me) has to ask the dumb question… Is the MX150 actually running the browsing benchmark or is the system falling back on its IGP for this benchmark?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      The MX150 is managed by Optimus so it’s quite likely that it’s only operating for the vast minority of these tests, if at all. The Intel IGP should be running the show in this light workload. I only call out the MX150 because it did have a meaningful impact on battery life in our i5-8250U review.

        • Andrew Lauritzen
        • 2 years ago

        It’s worth noting that “Optimus” is not really a thing in Windows 10 anymore, although NVIDIA still uses the term confusingly. In Windows 10 there is no longer any driver hooking and other nonsense, the only thing that happens is the OS tweaks the default adapter list depending on what process is being run. Since most games simple use the default adapter (vs. enumerating them all) this tends to work okay, but it’s worth noting that any application is certainly capable of enumerating and using one or both devices separately. There’s no “Optimus” vs “whatever AMD’s thing is” at this point though: this is all just a function of the OS now with none of the mess that there was previously.

        The only additional bit of complexity is that occasionally there’s some sort of display muxer in OEM systems to allow either GPU to drive the display. This is normally only the case if the OEM is trying to do something like drive an internal Gsync/Freesync display or similar, but it’s really the only bit of additional strangeness that you’ll find in multi-adapter Win10 laptops these days. Of course it’s certainly possible for an OEM to entirely disable the iGPU, but that’s generally a poor idea for obvious reasons. It’s far more common for the iGPU to be attached to the display and for the dGPU to be “render only” with Win10 handling the relevant cross-adapter blit.

          • tipoo
          • 2 years ago

          I’ve noticed that change, both GPUs can be getting usage in the new task manager (which is way cool – you can monitor GPU individual engines like compute vs 3D) at the same time. It’s actually rather handy since GPUs aren’t perfect at context switching so a compute load can bog down a display function, but Windows seems to choose pretty well here.

          It would be cool if games started running compute on IGPs and graphics on dGPUs, or in some way utilizing the IGP silicon that’s otherwise unused in a fullscreen game.

          • Klimax
          • 2 years ago

          Pretty sure change happened either with Windows Vista or 7 with introduction of WDDM.

            • DancinJack
            • 2 years ago

            It didn’t.

            • Klimax
            • 2 years ago

            Ok, looks like I misremembered it. My memory got bit confused due to certain features of WDDM and mismatched some info based them.
            (I was remembering this: [url<]https://www.notebookcheck.net/Nvidia-Optimus-Review.25467.0.html[/url<] - aka Optimus 3.0)

          • the
          • 2 years ago

          There isn’t even a display muxer anymore. The Intel graphic is responsible for all video output to HDMI, DP etc. The nVidia side will send a buffer over to the Intel graphics that then gets merged with what else the Intel graphics are responsible for. This means that laptops using optimus are strictly limited to three displays.

          Older implementations involved a switch that would swap outputs and both GPU’s would handle everything when active.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 2 years ago

            That’s odd – for some reason on both the MSI GS63VR and the Dell Inspiron Gaming 7000 series, external displays keep the Nvidia chip (GTX 1060 or GTX 1050Ti) busy.

            It’s also annoying that you can’t use DSR on either of those machines, and my Googling implies that DSR is a no-go on any gaming notebook.

            • Andrew Lauritzen
            • 2 years ago

            How internal and external displays are wired to the different adapters is of course entirely up to the OEM. In certain cases OEMs will wire external displays to the dGPU on the assumption that you may want things like VR or Gsync or whatever and that the laptop is typically plugged in when using external displays.

            Of course the caveat is that these displays then often can’t be used for certain types of protected video content (Netflix UltraHD or whatever).

            • the
            • 2 years ago

            Do those actually have Optimus? They do have a secondary GPU but it is not a requirement to use Optimus. As a gaming laptop, they’re designs primarily to run off of AC power.

            • Andrew Lauritzen
            • 2 years ago

            Yes, on most implementations only the iGPU is connected to the display. I mentioned the display MUX thing as there are still a few cases (certain Gsync laptops or things targeted for VR) where there is some sort of MUX in place as right now those things need the display/HMD to be connected to the GPU doing the rendering,

            And minor point but when you say “the NVIDIA side will send a buffer”, this is entirely handled by the operating system in Win10, not either IHV (thanks god). I know you’re probably aware of this but just wanted to be clear on the wording for other folks since that was the main point in my original reply 🙂

          • Bauxite
          • 2 years ago

          Some of these designs make running eGPUs have interesting behavior depending on the firmware. For example: lenovo yoga 920 turns off the iGPU completely if you full boot with a thunderbolt GPU attached, this gives the cpu (15W quad) more TDP/power headroom for turbo as well.

          Its possible to convince it to work like a normal dGPU+iGPU combo though, which is pretty neat to accelerate an internal 4k lcd with a monster desktop card. You lose a little more performance due to limited TB bandwidth (slightly less than x4 at best due to other restrictions) and more total load on the cpu package, but you’re still miles above any pure laptop.

          • psuedonymous
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<]It's worth noting that "Optimus" is not really a thing in Windows 10 anymore[/quote<] It is still kind of a thing, and a critically important thing for VR: With Optimus, the discrete GPU is not connected directly to the external display outputs, but instead passes the completed frames to the iGPU, which then hands them to the RAMDACs to be output to the external (or sometimes internal) display. This means a big extra chunk of latency for every frame delivered, and a real pain getting things enumerated correctly (because the dGPU is never talking to the actual device directly). Without Optimus, the discrete GPU gets a direct connection to the RAMDACs and everything is great.

            • Andrew Lauritzen
            • 2 years ago

            My point is that this is entirely a function of the operating system at this point with very minimal involvement from the dGPU vendor. To slightly correct your post, “completed frames” are not so much “passed through to the iGPU display hardware” as DWM composites them using shared surfaces similar to what happens in windowed mode. The swap chain still lives on the iGPU, but contents from windows running on various GPUs may be composited to it before presentation.

            This actually works the same with with multiple adapters on desktop GPUs as well, minus only the piece that tries to flip around the default adapter for applications that do not enumerate them explicitly. In that case the default adapter is simply the one attached to your primary display, but similarly applications are free to enumerate and use any/all of them.

            Win10 is actually waaaay better at this stuff than previous operating systems. It has finally made it possible to routinely have several unrelated adapters in a single system and use them as needed. This is particularly great for us developers as it makes testing on a variety of GPUs/IHVs very simple.

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      In general I’d guess the IGP is doing the heavy lifting for a browser benchmark but that does not mean the MX-150 is at absolute zero power draw either. So it’s a factor, but not the biggest factor.

      TR’s other test showed that the MX-150 system had about 1 hour lower battery life compared to the pure IGP notebook.

        • Andrew Lauritzen
        • 2 years ago

        Indeed, depending on the config there are various states of “off” or “idle” possible. A big one is whether or not the GDDR is still being powered to maintain state or whether it has been spilled to RAM and powered down. I’m not super familiar with NVIDIA’s driver policy on that sort of thing, but presumably the OEM also has tools to tweak the behavior, making it even more opaque to us users…

    • mtruchado
    • 2 years ago

    I got a question. As far as I know the hp envy x360 has a 1Tb mechanical hdd. Under my own experience, you get a battery boost when you replace such a hdd for an ssd, this is, you eliminate the mechanical parts which consume battery for a chip that almost does not consume any watt, did you consider this in your test?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      Windows’ power-management features shut off the mechanical hard drive when it’s idle, so it’s basically not a factor in this light workload. That said, we’ve been testing our Envy x360 with a Samsung 960 EVO in it from the start, so the hard drive is just along for the ride.

      HotHardware has a more detailed comparison of how the hard-drive-versus-SSD question affects performance and battery life: [url<]https://hothardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-2500u-benchmarks-revisited-hp-envy-x360-ssd-update[/url<]

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Ironically enough the hard drive solution had better battery life in their tests (although by a very small margin of only 13 minutes).

      • HERETIC
      • 2 years ago

      Don’t be fooled,that because SSD’s don’t have motors,they use less power.
      VERY roughly-most SSD’s up to 256 size will use less power
      Most 500 and up will use more than spinning rust.

      Nearly all 2-1/2″ lappy drives will run off USB2 power.(2.5 w)
      Quite a few SSD’s struggle.

    • Mr Bill
    • 2 years ago

    Thanks Jeff for a very interesting review!

    What a dramatic difference for browsing. I wonder if gaming benchmarks in a loop also favor one gpu architecture over the other?

    Another question… Is there a chip/set that drives the HDMI port on these systems and how much might that affect the outcome?

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]The Acer Swift 3 I got from Intel appears to have been a test mule at some point in its life. HWiNFO64 reports that the Swift 3 has already lost 10% of its battery capacity, from 50.7 Wh when it was new to 45.7 Wh now. In this measure of efficiency, though, that capacity decrease actually helps the Swift 3. The system posts a jaw-dropping 19 minutes of run time per watt-hour for light web browsing, or a 2.4-times-better result.[/quote<] For anybody asking, assuming the Swift 3 was at its boilerplate capacity of 50.7 Wh then the minutes-per-watt-hour number would have been 17.2 instead of 19.1.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    Thank you Jeff!

    Yes, you are completely right that these tests are certainly not meant to be taken as real-world expectations for the battery life of these notebooks in normal use. Instead, they are basically acting as control experiments that eliminate variables from the equation between two different products. You can’t eliminate [b<]every[/b<] variable but the display certainly pulls a decent chunk of power and eliminating its power draw helps to improve the SNR.

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      In a sense, this is what you might expect if your laptop were docked but without external power. I use my laptop connected to my TV via HDMI every morning to watch the news from a web browser. I usually forget to power on the charger until I get a notification on the screen.

        • Freon
        • 2 years ago

        edit: nevermind

          • Mr Bill
          • 2 years ago

          no matter?

            • willmore
            • 2 years ago

            Watch out, here comes Sluggo!

            • Mr Bill
            • 2 years ago

            Ooooooooh! Noooooooo!

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