Personal computing discussed

Moderators: Captain Ned, emkubed

 
ludi
Lord High Gerbil
Posts: 8109
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2002 10:47 pm
Location: Sunny Colorado front range

Re: Stay Safe!

Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:14 pm

layerup wrote:
Yes, I realize his argument, but my point was that I'm not sure how Ludi came to the conclusion that SPF would be in shortage, because it is grown and milled in Canada. Perhaps there will be some acute reduction in availability in the Texas gulf coast for a short time, but commodity building materials such as dimensional lumber tend to always be available. He may have argued that Southern Pine availability may have become slightly constrained, but southern pine isn't often used in Texas anyway.

Looks like there's been some price movement in structural lumber and a sharp jump for structural panels:
http://www.randomlengths.com/Woodwire/RL-Lbr-Pnl/

And now that California has about 8,700 structures to rebuild in (mainly) Napa and Sonoma counties...
Abacus Model 2.5 | Quad-Row FX with 256 Cherry Red Slider Beads | Applewood Frame | Water Cooling by Brita Filtration
 
JustAnEngineer
Gold subscriber
Gerbil God
Posts: 18305
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2002 7:00 pm
Location: The Heart of Dixie

Re: Stay Safe!

Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:00 pm

In a smarter world, those homes destroyed in fire-prone areas would be rebuilt using more fire-resistant materials.
i7-9700K, H100i v2, Z390M Pro4, 32 GiB, RX Vega64, Define Mini-C, SSR-850PX, C32HG70, RK-9000BR, MX518
 
Redocbew
Gold subscriber
Gerbil Jedi
Posts: 1748
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2014 11:44 am

Re: Stay Safe!

Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:47 pm

Well yeah, but typically the fires are more of a problem in southern California.
Do not meddle in the affairs of archers, for they are subtle and you won't hear them coming.
 
ludi
Lord High Gerbil
Posts: 8109
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2002 10:47 pm
Location: Sunny Colorado front range

Re: Stay Safe!

Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:06 am

JustAnEngineer wrote:
In a smarter world, those homes destroyed in fire-prone areas would be rebuilt using more fire-resistant materials.

There's talk of it. Cedar shake shingles (a huge problem in the 2007 San Diego fires) are increasingly being banned although there are non-combustible, composite look-alikes available for new construction and retrofits. A lesson-learned from the Wine Country fires is that blown embers can be forced into rooftop attic vents, so we can expect forthcoming code improvements on screening. Wood can be impregnated with fire-retardant chemicals, although given that CARB was a leader in banning wood composites that emit formaldehyde, I can't wait to see what long-term problems arise from use of lesser-known alternates.

From what I've read the two biggest problems were area classifications and defensible spaces. A lot of the Santa Rosa neighborhoods that burned were arguably inside the urban/wilderness transition zone and should have been built to stricter codes on fire resistance and vegetation control. But instead, they were classified as urban/residential and people assumed that a fire entering the neighborhood would be readily confined to one or a few units by urban fire response. Nooooooope.

In the end, I'm not sure what you can do to defend against prolonged drought and 60-70+ mph winds other than evacuate and rebuild. Santa Rosa lost a number of standalone businesses surrounded by parking, some of them well-separated from the forested areas (Applebees, McDonalds, gas station convenience, Kmart). Commercial buildings in those conditions are not normally susceptible to wildfire, but if you blast the area with a prolonged spray of firebrands, anything can happen.
Abacus Model 2.5 | Quad-Row FX with 256 Cherry Red Slider Beads | Applewood Frame | Water Cooling by Brita Filtration

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests