Personal computing discussed

Moderators: Captain Ned, emkubed

 
BIF
Gold subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Topic Author
Posts: 2344
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 7:41 pm

Re: The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:12 pm

Hey, it'll all be worth it if I can learn something. The possible bonus is I can put that money into a new gaming laptop or a new RTX 2080 TI for my workstation instead of a refrigerator. :P

And yes, I'm disappointed in Consumer Reports right now. They used to test things; I mean REALLY test things, brutally, and for months. But now we get CR recommendations breaking down. What gives, CR?
 
HERETIC
Gerbil XP
Posts: 482
Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2014 4:10 am

Re: The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 04, 2019 9:46 pm

BIF wrote:
And yes, I'm disappointed in Consumer Reports right now. They used to test things; I mean REALLY test things, brutally, and for months. But now we get CR recommendations breaking down. What gives, CR?


They're probably following the trend in tech sites. You used to have computer enthusiasts that could write a bit, now you tend to have journalists that know a bit about computers.

To answer your question-Probably can't afford to use engineering personnel. A journalist that can press buttons will do...........................
 
ludi
Lord High Gerbil
Posts: 8214
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2002 10:47 pm
Location: Sunny Colorado front range

Re: The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 04, 2019 11:48 pm

HERETIC wrote:
They're probably following the trend in tech sites. You used to have computer enthusiasts that could write a bit, now you tend to have journalists that know a bit about computers.

I'm going to guess the Internet is doing the same thing to Consumer's Union that it did to newspaper classifieds, and then did to big-box and specialty retail.
Abacus Model 2.5 | Quad-Row FX with 256 Cherry Red Slider Beads | Applewood Frame | Water Cooling by Brita Filtration
 
BIF
Gold subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Topic Author
Posts: 2344
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 7:41 pm

Re: The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:44 am

Update:

All fixed!

It was the right thing to do to wait for the two parts. When I pulled the door off the hinge, there were a few little plastic pieces that fell on the floor...my exact fear of not having the right parts on hand before attempting disassembly.

The old cam was completely nonfunctional. The lower-half was less than an eighth of the height of the replacement part. The old upper-half was completely worn/broken with nothing touching the lower-half cam...the door was actually resting (and pivoting directly) on the door's metal frame, and not on the cam! THAT can't be good for door alignment... :o

I unscrewed the old parts, with more little plastic bits falling on the floor. Then I had to extract a part of the old cam from the hinge hole in the door (that bushing part of it). Not difficult, I didn't even need pliers. The hardest part of putting it all back together was lining up the hole in the door (which I can't see since I'm holding the door) with the hinge pin. After several tries, I hit the target and screwed everything back together.

Now the door is at the proper height (compared to the freezer door) and it works much better, too..it detents open at 5 o'clock like the freezer door, and it seems to stay closed now with just regular pressure. My milk, cheese, steaks, beer, wine, and fresh produce very much love it now! :roll:

Oh, I also had to vacuum a couple of dead rats from the front coils. Well, they weren't really rats, they just were big tumbleweed dust balls the size of rats! The coil was pretty clogged, so I may see some improvement now that it can breathe better. And I'll clean it out a little more often, like maybe once every 7 years instead of every 15... :P

Everything was easy to do, but with one little note: Not all refrigerators are made the same way. My kick plate is held in by two little hex-head bolts. YouTube, convinced that all Whirlpool side-by-side fridges have clip-on kick plates, had me pulling and prying. Just before I advanced to the "ripping and tearing" stage, suspicion got the better of me and I crouched down with a flashlight and saw the bolts. D'oh!

Happy happy now that I might not need to buy a new fridge. And even happier that I might not get food poisoning either, since my food can stay cold! :D

Thank you to all who provided info and input!
 
farmpuma
Silver subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2730
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 12:33 am
Location: Soybean field, IN, USA, Earth .. just a bit south of John .. err .... Fart Wayne, Indiana
Contact:

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:35 am

Congrats on saving a major appliance! When loading the door always remember to keep the heavy stuff close to the hinge. Eight pounds per gallon of milk or water with a two or three foot lever can exert a lot of torque on plastic parts.
[img]http://[/img] Image
.* * M-51 * *. .The Whirlpool Galaxy. .Good gun control is hitting your target and only your target.
 
liquidsquid
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2628
Joined: Wed May 29, 2002 10:49 am
Location: New York
Contact:

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 8:44 am

To extend the life of those plastics, you may be able to use some lithium-based or silicon-based food safe greases. Any abrasive dust gets in there, it will grind it down again without some grease to keep the crud out.

We were tossing around the idea of getting a new fridge, and found that the best ones were actually some of the "cheapest" You know, no ice maker, no fancy anything, just a fridge. Compressors were better in those, but noisier. It seemed the fancier the fridge, the less of a fridge it became. You really have to jump to the commercial lines to get anything that may last as long as fridges from 2001, and who has the scratch for that? Plus most of those are enormous.

Over my dead body I am getting one with a computer in the door. That will be the first smashed item based on how many dishes and glasses and oven fronts have met their fate in our kitchen. Then another machine to maintain with software updates, vulnerabilities, and aggravation.

I think in the name of efficiency, the compressors now are matched to the fridge to run almost 24/7 instead of a <10% duty cycle of older fridges. Therefore they wear out 10x faster. How is it more energy efficient in the grand scheme of things if you have to manufacture and transport a new fridge every couple of years?
 
kvndoom
Silver subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2734
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2004 11:47 pm
Location: Communistwealth of Virginia

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:00 am

liquidsquid wrote:
To extend the life of those plastics, you may be able to use some lithium-based or silicon-based food safe greases. Any abrasive dust gets in there, it will grind it down again without some grease to keep the crud out.

We were tossing around the idea of getting a new fridge, and found that the best ones were actually some of the "cheapest" You know, no ice maker, no fancy anything, just a fridge. Compressors were better in those, but noisier. It seemed the fancier the fridge, the less of a fridge it became. You really have to jump to the commercial lines to get anything that may last as long as fridges from 2001, and who has the scratch for that? Plus most of those are enormous.

Over my dead body I am getting one with a computer in the door. That will be the first smashed item based on how many dishes and glasses and oven fronts have met their fate in our kitchen. Then another machine to maintain with software updates, vulnerabilities, and aggravation.

I think in the name of efficiency, the compressors now are matched to the fridge to run almost 24/7 instead of a <10% duty cycle of older fridges. Therefore they wear out 10x faster. How is it more energy efficient in the grand scheme of things if you have to manufacture and transport a new fridge every couple of years?

It's energy efficient for the homeowner, and just like MPG for a car, they're buying the number they see on the sticker. Everything's a throw-away commodity these days.
A most unfortunate, Freudian, double entendre is that hotel named "Budget Inn."
 
Thrashdog
Gerbil XP
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 1:16 pm
Location: Kansas City

Re: The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:49 am

BIF wrote:
just brew it! wrote:
ozzuneoj wrote:

I'm really liking my 60 cent nylon washer idea right about now. :lol:


LOL, me too!


I'm late to this particular party, but if you really want commercial-grade reliability it pays to haunt equipment auctions. A lot of restaurants buy new equipment at startup, and then it goes up to auction in six months to a year after they fold (easily half of all restaurants don't make it past the 6-month mark). You can grab a whole commercial kitchen setup for pennies on the dollar, if you're so inclined. Just be ready to go through a lot of Scotchbrite and degreaser... restaurant clean and home kitchen clean frequently aren't quite the same thing. :lol:
 
castdude
Gerbil In Training
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun May 04, 2014 7:10 am

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:44 am

Late to the party, to the extreme. I repaired my 12 year old Jenn-Air side by side refrigerator, replacing a small circuit board sourced from one of the repair sites mentioned, which seemed costly except when comparing it to the price of a new refrigerator. None of that is worth mentioning, but that does get me in the conversation, as I now can throw my two cents in. When I hear about using industrial components for longevity (or just coolness factor), I go back to my aerospace days, at which time everybody had a copy of this at their workstation: https://www.pic-design.com/, otherwise known as the PIC catalog. If you were exceptionally lucky, the fabrication shop might have some of these various goodies in bins readily available, for "research", (AKA fixing you car). All you needed was a trusty caliper to measure the critical dimensions. These do cost more than the stuff at Lowes or Home Depot, but when people start mentioning $8,000 refrigerators, the prices seem reasonable. All in all, I'll take twelve years and running over the planned obsolescence of a front load washing machine, Grr.
 
cegras
Gerbil First Class
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2007 3:12 pm

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:12 pm

liquidsquid wrote:
To extend the life of those plastics, you may be able to use some lithium-based or silicon-based food safe greases. Any abrasive dust gets in there, it will grind it down again without some grease to keep the crud out.

We were tossing around the idea of getting a new fridge, and found that the best ones were actually some of the "cheapest" You know, no ice maker, no fancy anything, just a fridge. Compressors were better in those, but noisier. It seemed the fancier the fridge, the less of a fridge it became. You really have to jump to the commercial lines to get anything that may last as long as fridges from 2001, and who has the scratch for that? Plus most of those are enormous.

Over my dead body I am getting one with a computer in the door. That will be the first smashed item based on how many dishes and glasses and oven fronts have met their fate in our kitchen. Then another machine to maintain with software updates, vulnerabilities, and aggravation.

I think in the name of efficiency, the compressors now are matched to the fridge to run almost 24/7 instead of a <10% duty cycle of older fridges. Therefore they wear out 10x faster. How is it more energy efficient in the grand scheme of things if you have to manufacture and transport a new fridge every couple of years?


What makes you think the compressor will wear out 10x faster? I thought with most things, it is the on/off cycle where most of the wear occurs.
 
liquidsquid
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2628
Joined: Wed May 29, 2002 10:49 am
Location: New York
Contact:

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:36 pm

cegras wrote:
What makes you think the compressor will wear out 10x faster? I thought with most things, it is the on/off cycle where most of the wear occurs.


Simply based on how bad reliability has become. It is an educated guess. However, I think they still power cycle as many times, but due to their much smaller capability, they run at a higher duty cycle, say 50-90%.
 
Wirko
Gerbil First Class
Posts: 168
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 4:38 am
Location: Central Europe

Re: The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:14 pm

BIF wrote:
Update:

All fixed!

It's great to hear that!

BIF wrote:
the door was actually resting (and pivoting directly) on the door's metal frame, and not on the cam!

This is the part I don't understand. You said the door was running smoothly from fully open to fully closed. But the door sliding and scratching on its metal frame, that makes a very very bad hinge, and should offer quite some resistance when opening and even more when closing.

As farmpuma said, keep the heavy stuff close to the hinge. Or better yet, store only light stuff on the door. Or ... you can also buy one more set of replacement parts.

BIF wrote:
My milk, cheese, steaks, beer, wine, and fresh produce very much love it now! :roll:

I bought an Inkbird Mini recording thermometer/hygrometer. It can tell you a lot about what's going on in your fridge. For example: temperature variations are much greater at the back of the shelves (close to the coils) than at the front, greater on the top shelf than on the bottom shelf, and very small in the drawers. Each shelf of course has a different average temperature, and observing the sawtooth-shaped temperature graph, I can also track the duty cycle of the compressor. In my case, it turns on 6 or 7 times in 24 hours, each time for ~30 minutes, when it's around 15°C outside. I don't think it (and its software) can be set up to trigger an alarm if something goes wrong, though.
 
Wirko
Gerbil First Class
Posts: 168
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 4:38 am
Location: Central Europe

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:25 pm

cegras wrote:
I thought with most things, it is the on/off cycle where most of the wear occurs.

It this also generally true of compressors and other electric motor-driven stuff?
However, there's another part that frequent on-off cycling can kill: the thermostat. What do you do if you can't find the original part for an old fridge? Do generic thermostats exist?
 
liquidsquid
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2628
Joined: Wed May 29, 2002 10:49 am
Location: New York
Contact:

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:07 am

Wirko wrote:
cegras wrote:
I thought with most things, it is the on/off cycle where most of the wear occurs.

It this also generally true of compressors and other electric motor-driven stuff?
However, there's another part that frequent on-off cycling can kill: the thermostat. What do you do if you can't find the original part for an old fridge? Do generic thermostats exist?

FWIW Brewers will bypass the thermostat in a fridge with a controller to set temperature profiles over time, so it is relatively simple to "overclock" your fridge with a digital controller if desired. Unless of course you don't want a digital display hanging off the side of your appliance.
 
just brew it!
Gold subscriber
Administrator
Posts: 52313
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:30 am

liquidsquid wrote:
Wirko wrote:
cegras wrote:
I thought with most things, it is the on/off cycle where most of the wear occurs.

It this also generally true of compressors and other electric motor-driven stuff?
However, there's another part that frequent on-off cycling can kill: the thermostat. What do you do if you can't find the original part for an old fridge? Do generic thermostats exist?

FWIW Brewers will bypass the thermostat in a fridge with a controller to set temperature profiles over time, so it is relatively simple to "overclock" your fridge with a digital controller if desired. Unless of course you don't want a digital display hanging off the side of your appliance.

Yeah, you really want an "old school" fridge/freezer with a mechanical thermostat though, since the temperature controllers work by cycling the mains power on and off. Electronic thermostat may revert to default settings when that happens.
Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
 
notfred
Maximum Gerbil
Posts: 4545
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 10:10 am
Location: Ottawa, Canada

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:56 am

Modern "inverter" fridges rectify the AC to DC and then use a computer controlled inverter to run the compressor at variable speeds. They run a lot more, but use less power overall because they are not running flat out. We will see long term how this affects lifetime!
 
cegras
Gerbil First Class
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2007 3:12 pm

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:43 pm

Wirko wrote:
cegras wrote:
I thought with most things, it is the on/off cycle where most of the wear occurs.

It this also generally true of compressors and other electric motor-driven stuff?
However, there's another part that frequent on-off cycling can kill: the thermostat. What do you do if you can't find the original part for an old fridge? Do generic thermostats exist?


I thought that was conventional wisdom for HDDs, although now that you mention it I am questioning myself.
 
Waco
Gold subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2667
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 4:14 pm
Location: Los Alamos, NM

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:27 pm

notfred wrote:
Modern "inverter" fridges rectify the AC to DC and then use a computer controlled inverter to run the compressor at variable speeds. They run a lot more, but use less power overall because they are not running flat out. We will see long term how this affects lifetime!

Our LG definitely does this. The noise profile is considerably different in the summer than the winter. It still only runs *maybe* 50% duty cycle, and that's with the freezer at -6 F and the fridge at 33 F.
Desktop: Z170A Gaming Pro Carbon | 6700K @ 4.4 | 16 GB | Radeon VII | XSPC RX360 | Heatkiller R3 | Samsung 4K 40" | 2048 + 240 + LSI 9207-8i (128x8) SSD
NAS: 1950X | Designare EX | 32 GB ECC | 7x8 TB RAIDZ2 | 8x2 TB RAID10 | FreeNAS | ZFS | LSI SAS
 
BIF
Gold subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Topic Author
Posts: 2344
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 7:41 pm

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:04 pm

farmpuma wrote:
Congrats on saving a major appliance! When loading the door always remember to keep the heavy stuff close to the hinge. Eight pounds per gallon of milk or water with a two or three foot lever can exert a lot of torque on plastic parts.
Yes indeed, the milk is always next to the hinge.

liquidsquid wrote:
To extend the life of those plastics, you may be able to use some lithium-based or silicon-based food safe greases. Any abrasive dust gets in there, it will grind it down again without some grease to keep the crud out.

Already done. I used some silicone grease from my pool supplies box!

We were tossing around the idea of getting a new fridge, and found that the best ones were actually some of the "cheapest" You know, no ice maker, no fancy anything, just a fridge. Compressors were better in those, but noisier. It seemed the fancier the fridge, the less of a fridge it became. You really have to jump to the commercial lines to get anything that may last as long as fridges from 2001, and who has the scratch for that? Plus most of those are enormous.

Over my dead body I am getting one with a computer in the door. That will be the first smashed item based on how many dishes and glasses and oven fronts have met their fate in our kitchen. Then another machine to maintain with software updates, vulnerabilities, and aggravation.

I think in the name of efficiency, the compressors now are matched to the fridge to run almost 24/7 instead of a <10% duty cycle of older fridges. Therefore they wear out 10x faster. How is it more energy efficient in the grand scheme of things if you have to manufacture and transport a new fridge every couple of years?
See, now I'd be happy to get a high-tech fridge *IF* they were reliable. But they're not. I blame the industry consolidation over the last 20 years for this. We need more competition. Break up Whirlpool! :evil: :lol:

Thrashdog wrote:

I'm late to this particular party, but if you really want commercial-grade reliability it pays to haunt equipment auctions...
I'll keep my eyes open, but my kitchen is one of those Kraftmaid constructions with a precisely-sized receptacle for the fridge. Can't go bigger, and it must be a "counter depth" (aka, smaller from front to back) model, in order to fit the space.

Wirko wrote:

BIF wrote:
the door was actually resting (and pivoting directly) on the door's metal frame, and not on the cam!


This is the part I don't understand. You said the door was running smoothly from fully open to fully closed. But the door sliding and scratching on its metal frame, that makes a very very bad hinge, and should offer quite some resistance when opening and even more when closing.
Although the hinge was pivoting, it was metal-on-plastic, because the bottom cam was providing a mating surface for the metal fridge frame resting upon it. And it was still being held together by the hinge pin extending up into the door and the "bushing" part of the old upper cam. It was working, but not well, as you've observed and as this entire thread indicates. :P

As farmpuma said, keep the heavy stuff close to the hinge. Or better yet, store only light stuff on the door. Or ... you can also buy one more set of replacement parts.
Good point; I'll think on this. If I think this fridge will still be working even 5 years from now, I'll go ahead and buy another set of parts for the fridge side and the freezer side.

I bought an Inkbird Mini recording thermometer/hygrometer. It can tell you a lot about what's going on in your fridge. For example: temperature variations are much greater at the back of the shelves (close to the coils) than at the front, greater on the top shelf than on the bottom shelf, and very small in the drawers. Each shelf of course has a different average temperature, and observing the sawtooth-shaped temperature graph, I can also track the duty cycle of the compressor. In my case, it turns on 6 or 7 times in 24 hours, each time for ~30 minutes, when it's around 15°C outside. I don't think it (and its software) can be set up to trigger an alarm if something goes wrong, though.
Interesting! Bookmarked, for sure.

just brew it! wrote:
liquidsquid wrote:
Wirko wrote:
It this also generally true of compressors and other electric motor-driven stuff?
However, there's another part that frequent on-off cycling can kill: the thermostat. What do you do if you can't find the original part for an old fridge? Do generic thermostats exist?

FWIW Brewers will bypass the thermostat in a fridge with a controller to set temperature profiles over time, so it is relatively simple to "overclock" your fridge with a digital controller if desired. Unless of course you don't want a digital display hanging off the side of your appliance.

Yeah, you really want an "old school" fridge/freezer with a mechanical thermostat though, since the temperature controllers work by cycling the mains power on and off. Electronic thermostat may revert to default settings when that happens.
Thank you for the info all. But an old-school fridge/freezer is actually not what I really want. I want a modern fridge with a working ice/water chiller, LED lighting, a flexible-storage compartment that can be switched from freezer to fresh-food and back (for garden harvest time or deer season), and I want that unit to last for 20+ years, or better yet, one that is modular and allows for a swap-out of all the standard fridgety parts. Of course, finding a unicorn that farts rainbows and glitter would be a lot easier than finding my dream fridge amongst the current crop of poor performing manufacturers.

So far so good, the fridge is now staying in the green zone and the door closes securely every time. Let's file this in the "WhooHoo!" folder! :lol: :P
 
just brew it!
Gold subscriber
Administrator
Posts: 52313
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:46 am

BIF wrote:
just brew it! wrote:
liquidsquid wrote:
FWIW Brewers will bypass the thermostat in a fridge with a controller to set temperature profiles over time, so it is relatively simple to "overclock" your fridge with a digital controller if desired. Unless of course you don't want a digital display hanging off the side of your appliance.

Yeah, you really want an "old school" fridge/freezer with a mechanical thermostat though, since the temperature controllers work by cycling the mains power on and off. Electronic thermostat may revert to default settings when that happens.

Thank you for the info all. But an old-school fridge/freezer is actually not what I really want. I want a modern fridge with a working ice/water chiller, LED lighting, a flexible-storage compartment that can be switched from freezer to fresh-food and back (for garden harvest time or deer season), and I want that unit to last for 20+ years, or better yet, one that is modular and allows for a swap-out of all the standard fridgety parts. Of course, finding a unicorn that farts rainbows and glitter would be a lot easier than finding my dream fridge amongst the current crop of poor performing manufacturers.

Sorry for the confusion. My comment was specifically directed at liquidsquid and his tangent about re-purposing fridges for other cooling tasks by using an outboard temperature controller.

That said, most of the modern bells and whistles are just more things which will eventually break. Our current fridge is nearly 20 now, and I am dreading the day when we eventually need to replace it since I'm sure our choice will be between crap and paying way too much.

Aside: When our washing machine died several years back we replaced it with a Speed Queen commercial unit. A little pricey and very no-frills (it still uses an electro-mechanical cycle timer instead of electronics!), but it has been rock solid.
Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
 
Wirko
Gerbil First Class
Posts: 168
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 4:38 am
Location: Central Europe

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:52 am

BIF, I suggest you write an executive summary, with a couple pics if possible, and post it in the "Anyone repair anything today?" thread. That's where more people go looking for solutions - or just ideas.
 
BIF
Gold subscriber
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Topic Author
Posts: 2344
Joined: Tue May 25, 2004 7:41 pm

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:48 am

Wirko wrote:
BIF, I suggest you write an executive summary, with a couple pics if possible, and post it in the "Anyone repair anything today?" thread. That's where more people go looking for solutions - or just ideas.
That's a great idea and I did take pics that show the wear-and-tear. After all these years, I still haven't chosen a photo hosting site. And now I'm onto the next project. 8)
 
Captain Ned
Gold subscriber
Global Moderator
Posts: 27511
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2002 7:00 pm
Location: Vermont, USA

Re: [Fixed!] The Sad State of Appliances (in this case, Refrigerators)

Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:09 pm

BIF wrote:
After all these years, I still haven't chosen a photo hosting site. And now I'm onto the next project. 8)

Just use a free Dropbox account and change the end of the link from "dl=0" to "raw=1"
Humans sleep soundly in their beds because rough cats stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests