Personal computing discussed

Moderators: SecretSquirrel, just brew it!

 
just brew it!
Gold subscriber
Administrator
Posts: 51938
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:51 pm
Location: Somewhere, having a beer

Re: Python practice programs

Wed Jul 29, 2015 2:32 pm

OP mentioned SQL first.
Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
 
MarkG509
Gerbil Elite
Posts: 743
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2013 6:51 pm

Re: Python practice programs

Wed Jul 29, 2015 2:51 pm

morphine wrote:
Jeez guys, OP just got into programming and we're already talking databases, NoSQL, recursion, etc? :lol:

+1

That's why I sent the O'Reilly link, and previously sent the discussion from Hacker News. I've had to (and even been asked to but declined after I figured out who broke what/where how badly) fix issues. Solid/fundamental learning, whether self-taught or in university (personally, I weight them equally), is priceless.
 
Flatland_Spider
Graphmaster Gerbil
Posts: 1324
Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2004 8:33 pm

Re: Python practice programs

Thu Jul 30, 2015 4:56 pm

morphine wrote:
Jeez guys, OP just got into programming and we're already talking databases, NoSQL, recursion, etc? :lol:


Recursion is fundamental stuff.

The OP did ask for real world examples, and interfacing with a database isn't that hard with Python. Import SQLAchemy and SQLite then go at it. The OP isn't going to get into doing anything really complicated with SQL just yet.
 
cheesyking
Minister of Gerbil Affairs
Posts: 2693
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2004 7:52 am
Location: That London (or so I'm told)
Contact:

Re: Python practice programs

Fri Jul 31, 2015 9:11 am

morphine wrote:
Jeez guys, OP just got into programming and we're already talking databases, NoSQL, recursion, etc? :lol:


The reason I brought recursion etc up was simply because (I believe) if you've been at least introduced to these concepts early on you are more likely to find mastering them easier later on. Even if you don't start using them right away being aware of them means you can start thinking about when and where they can be used.

Personally I went through the whole self taught programming thing learning almost exclusively from the manuals that came with my computers and this was great up to a point. The problem is that I spent so long working with very basic programming techniques that even 15+ years on and after getting "proper" programming education at university I still tend to fall back on some very bad habits I picked up in my early years.

Maybe I'm going too far the other way but the thing is if you're going to use other libraries to start doing things beyond basic "how to program" type examples you need to know about some of these things (OK maybe not recursion but certainly OOP).

Anyway to the OP, something else to play with is PIL (Python Imaging Library). This lets you manipulate images: crop, resize, edit, create etc. It's really powerful and fairly easy to use once you know some basic OOP concepts (you don't need to know how to write a class or about inheritance, you just need to know how to use objects). It might make a nice change to work with something that isn't just text.
Fernando!
Your mother ate my dog!
 
Stranger
Graphmaster Gerbil
Posts: 1433
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2003 8:51 pm
Location: Socialist republic of Ohio
Contact:

Re: Python practice programs

Sun Aug 23, 2015 2:03 am

I'm joining in this party late but i would suggest taking a look at Amazon's career cup interview questions.

http://www.careercup.com/page?pid=amazo ... sort=votes

Not only are they a step up from hello world questions. They will also get you a job! I would also suggest practicing writing unit tests for your code as well. Being good at writing unit tests is a massively useful skill that people underestimate.
 
Redocbew
Gold subscriber
Gerbil Jedi
Posts: 1759
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2014 11:44 am

Re: Python practice programs

Sun Aug 23, 2015 10:35 pm

Unit tests are essential once you start coding in the real world. Even if you don't strictly follow test driven development, unit tests are still useful for regression testing to make sure the new stuff you've been working on won't have unintended effects.

Pet peeve: broken English in the description of a programming problem. My attention should be focused on the problem to be solved, not parsing the language of the problem itself.
Do not meddle in the affairs of archers, for they are subtle and you won't hear them coming.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest