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BadSweetums
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Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:19 pm

I'm planning a high end Ryzen build. My previous question in Motherboards and Memory yielded quick, helpful and usable information, thanks team Tech Report, I feel it is time for a brief discussion of storage interfaces. (BTW, a 2-ch high speed memory solution is probably the best way to go until CPUs need more bandwidth for maximum performance.)

I am interested in the U.2 pcie x4 interface as opposed to the M.2 pcie x4 interface. Both interfaces offer the same POTENTIAL transfer speeds (yes, I wanted to use all caps. I have a deep, possibly misguided, distrust for POTENTIAL stuff.) It looks like a no brainer to me,

M.2 connectors do not look expensive. M.2 pcie x4 drives are easy to purchase. M.2 looks like the way to go.

U.2 looks like an engineering lab escapee. I've only found a few drives available for purchase. BUT ... Manufacturers are taking the time and trouble to add U,2 to their new products. .

I might invest in U.2 if it can connect an external storage device, or devices. But it sure looks like a dead end at the moment.

So, can anybody explain the wonderfulness of U.2? Thanks for sharing.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 3:02 am

The big advantage of U.2 is in the server space where drives are expected to be hot swap. This is not possible with M.2 mounted on the motherboard.

In the consumer space, you can find M.2 to U.2 without much difficulty. I have found a couple of U.2 to M.2 adapters that would permit a M.2 card to fit into a 3.5" hard drive bay, though they're not from sellers I would trust. One reason to go U.2 even with a U.2 to M.2 adapter is thermal issues. Several of the M.2 cards run very hot and will go into thermal throttling at full speed. Putting a heat sink on them helps but with a U.2 to M.2 adapter, they can be placed in an area with more airflow.
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 4:41 am

Yeah, don't even bother with U.2 peripherals, U.2 is the enterprise version of SATA express and you usually see it on 2.5" datacenter drives. The cabling is pretty messy and in the consumer space you're going to be using a fair few adapters. I think U.2 is really only suited to a rackmount server backplane and even then it's pretty rare since most server backplanes using 2.5" form factors use NL-SATA/SAS hybrid connectors for flexibility. I've never actually encountered a U.2 backplane in the field and I've been to dozens of server rooms and the odd large-scale datacenter. O.o

U.2 products aren't usually tuned for consumer workloads, they aren't usually cost-effective compared to consumer drives, and they're likely to be one of two things:
  1. Cutting-edge technology with the latest server/RAID/monitoring features and an eye-watering price
  2. Quite outdated tech that is still on sale because it is on a heavily-validated hardware list and certified for popular servers that are still under 3 or 5 year support plans.

Given the limitations of SSD controllers for small file transfers at low queue depths and the massive drop in sustained-write speeds for most SSDs once the cache/SLC-mode NAND/other buffering systems are full, your best bet for external storage is probably still USB 3.x and a simple SATA drive. For random workloads, USB 3.x and the SATA interface are NOT the bottleneck at all; The bottleneck in this instance is the SSD controller and the sustained write speed of the NAND, so get a 2.5" SATA drive that's either MLC with a decent controller or one of the newer 3D NAND TLC drives like the Samsung 850EVO or the Crucial MX300, since they have decent cost/GB as well as decent sustained performance.

As for M.2, if you want performance that justifies the PCIe 3.0 4x NVMe interface, you should either get yourself the OCZ RD400 or a Samsung 960 variant. You shouldn't need to worry about heat for consumer workloads, but you can always move the M.2 gumstick from the motherboard slot to a PCIe riser with a heatsink at a later date if you feel that your server-like QD32 sustained 4K write torture benchmarks (which bear no relevance to consumer PCs at all) aren't giving you the benchmark scores you always wanted.

I am particularly fond of TR's Robobench 8T "copy" workload scores, since they're performed after 30m of 4K writes torture, and represent the worst-case scenario for how a drive might look under heavy consumer usage:

Image

You can see that the 850EVO and the MX300 are both very decent SATA drives for internal/extenal flexibility and that it really doesn't matter which NVMe drive you get since they're all vastly superior and it comes down to whether you want to pay through the nose for the current (and soon-to-be-beaten-by-something-else) champion, or aim for something with less painful costs/GB. Again, the RD400 and larger capacity 960EVO look decent, even though it pains me to recommend a Samsung drive.
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BadSweetums
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 5:46 am

Thank you mighty lions of IT. I kinda understood that U.2 has merit. I just did not understand in what context. You made the decision chain clear and understandable. M.2 x4 good. U.2 x4 good, hot swappable and more accessible for cooling.

May I cast a small amount of shade on the utility of putting just one U.2 port on a Motherboard?

Or, would enterprise practice add a port multiplier so that meaningful amounts of storage can be added?

Just saying, one hot swap drive implies a small mission critical system; an array implies a backbone mission critical system. IMO.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 5:55 am

A U.2 port on a consumer board is probably just evidence of feature creep. Someone crammed it in there just to help differentiate one board from all the others. Most people who know they're going to need hot swappable drives are probably going to be buying different gear anyway. If what you want is a wicked fast gaming machine, then you probably don't need hot swappable drives. Might as well stick with M.2 or SATA and make your life a little easier.
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BadSweetums
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:03 am

Feature creep, marketing and unicorn stickers all seem appropriate to me.

As in 'Yo doodz, look at my braggin rights system. I'm using U.2. It is hot swappable and I have three fans cooling it for my ultimate power big data mining operations. ;-)'

Not me, just in it for kicks and to have something real in the "Age of Alternative FACTZ". U.2 is dead to me now. :-( (what? No tears! Where are the HD smilies?)

A bling system, performance wise, is so much cheaper than a Corvette when that ugly old fart starts showing up in your bathroom mirror.

I may consider a two drive M.2 x4 striped array. Thinking speed over redundancy. No long term projects. Frequent back ups to mass storage should not create too much overhead.

Thanks for helping. Please have a magical day.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:10 am

To be fair, though, this stuff's designed in advance, and there were some hints that enthusiast SSDs might go towards U.2 instead of M.2, for those cooling reasons - remember that the Samsung 950 Pros (which were M.2) were throttling under heavy load, when Intel SSD 750s (which were PCIe x4 or U.2) were not.

Look at the Z170 era, where a lot of boards had SATA Express, even though, by the time the Z170 boards came out, it became apparent that SATA Express was DOA.

One thing to remember is, as far as a PCIe SSD is concerned, M.2 M-key and U.2 are identical. Both support PCIe x4, and that's the important part.

Here's a quick summary of the standardized (no Apple-specific stuff here) PCIe-based SSD connectors out there:

Flat cards against the motherboard (suitable for laptops):
M.2 B-key: Part of M.2 standard (aka NGFF, and isn't just for SSDs), 2 lanes of PCIe and one lane of SATA. SSDs don't usually use this, but if a M.2 SSD only needs either 2 lanes of PCIe, or SATA, it may be cut for both B and M key so that it works in both (primarily for laptop upgrade applications). Also used for WWAN cards (it has USB, audio, and SIM card access pins).
M.2 M-key: Part of M.2 standard, 4 lanes of PCIe and one lane of SATA. This is what most M.2 SSDs use.

Cabled or backplaned 2.5" drives:
SATA Express: Part of SATA standard, 2 lanes of PCIe or 2 SATA connections. Motherboard connector is based on two standard SATA connectors (for backwards compatibility with SATA devices), with a third additional connector to get some additional pins. Drive connector is based on SAS backplane connector but with additional pins - one SATA drive can plug into this and function as SATA.
U.2: Part of SFF standards (aka SFF-8639), 4 lanes of PCIe or 1 lane of SATA or 2 lanes of SAS. Motherboard connector is based on Mini-SAS 12 Gbit/s connector (SFF-8643), pinout in servers is inconsistent, pinout in client is consistent. Drive connector is also based on SAS backplane connector, and with more additional pins than SATA Express. SATA or SAS may or may not work, depending on what the controller it's connected to supports and what pins are actually connected on the SFF-8643 connector. SATA Express should work in this. (I believe client SFF-8643 does not support SATA, and of course it doesn't support SAS because clients don't support it.)

Vertical cards:
PCIe: This is just an ordinary PCIe card. Usually PCIe x4 or PCIe x8.

Also note that you can adapt between these in multiple directions, because it's all PCIe. PCIe to M.2? Yep. M.2 to SFF-8643 client? Yep. SATA Express to M.2? Yep (you lose performance doing that, though, unless your drive is cut for B key). SATA Express to PCIe x1 (why even)? Yep. SATA Express to dual M.2? Yep (but each drive only gets one lane, and your chipset needs to support PCIe bifurcation...) SFF-8643 client to PCIe x4? Yep. U.2 to M.2? Yep. U.2 to PCIe x4? Yep. If you can think of a configuration, someone's probably done it.
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BadSweetums
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 9:38 am

Thanks for opening the myriad possibilities of using good adapters. An adapter may be necessary if I pursue a dual PCIe x4 drive RAID array.

The X370 motherboard that I have been exploring offers 2 M.2 x4 ports (one 2.0, one 3.0) and a U.2 x4 3.0 port. The U.2 port and the M.2 3.0 port share the same PCIe lanes.

I was thinking of a striped RAID M.2 drive array until I looked at the implications of putting one drive on x4 2.0 and one on x4 3.0.

Possibly obsolete background knowledge says that in any RAID array the fastest drive will be limited to the same speed as the slowest drive. Therefor, the proposed 2.0/3.0 array is less effective than just buying a larger M.2 x4 3.0 drive. Or ...

Finding another four PCIe x4 3.0 lanes and adapting in a compatible drive. Ummmhh, Yeeaaahhh; probably not.

Sometimes the best solution is the obvious solution. And, I fear, this is one of those times. Just saying, complexity and ultimate performance are frequently incompatible with normal day to day use.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:25 pm

Hot swappable SSDs are overrated in most consumer systems. Most people will put their boot+OS on that fast SSD and you can't really hot swap the system drive like any other data drives. If you have secondary storage that needs to be on SSD, then that means you probably know what you are doing.

May I ask what kind of application that requires RAID0 of NVMe drives? When you talk "datamining", how big of data set are we talking about? Because at the end of the day, if your dataset is not in the terabyte range, the fastest is still to put all that data in RAM.
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BadSweetums
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Sun Feb 26, 2017 8:29 pm

Please pardon a direct explanation of my lame attempt at humor by attempting to impersonate a n3wb3 60d (please decode using a basic leetspeak decoder) who might say 'Yo doodz, look at my braggin rights system. I'm using U.2. It is hot swappable and I have three fans cooling it for my ultimate power big data mining operations. ;-)'

Who knows what a n3wb3 60d might want to datamine? Yugio cardsets? celebrity real vs photo-shopped skin pix? How to win at blackjack by counting cards that have already been played.

I was just kidding.

I feel motherboards which appear to offer capabilities, that can't be very useful, are worthy of derision directed towards the most likely target of said advanced technology marketing, a newbe god.

P.S.

I've deleted a large explanation that distills down to the new Ryzen X370 express chipset having a total of 20 Gen 3.0 PCIe lanes and seven Gen 2.0 PCIe lanes. 27 PCIe lanes in total.

My motherboard choice, the GIGABYTE GA-AX370-GAMING 5, appears to have enough ports and slots to fill 63 PCIe lanes until you study the limitations.

*** References to how many lanes and slots are based on MSI's X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM manual, page 30, PCIe bandwidth table for Ryzen series processors. ***

I am offended because encouraging me, a customer, to buy expensive hardware to fill incompatible ports and slots seems unkind. (Why do we always have to read the fine print?)

My best choices appear to be one x16 3.0 video card, one M.2 x4 3.0 drive, any Gen 2.0 x4 PCIe device, or M.2 drive; and up to three Gen 2.0 PCIe x1 devices, if they can fit in with the other hardware. (my most likely choice for a Gen 2.0 x4 device is an x16 video card serving as a dedicated physics card.)

I am underwhelmed. I wanted x32 SLI/Crossfire, with simultaneous NVME RAID0. I wanted more.

Ryzen is good within limitations. I desire more but I will buy what is available if it makes sense. It has a lot to offer, just not 63 Gen 3.0 PCIe lanes.

If AMD survives, maybe future products will offer chipzilla a serious challenge. As I have already said, this is good; but I want more.
Last edited by BadSweetums on Wed Mar 01, 2017 6:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Mon Feb 27, 2017 2:03 am

BadSweetums wrote:

I've deleted a large explanation that distills down to the new Ryzen X370 express chipset having a total of 20 Gen 3.0 PCIe lanes and seven Gen 2.0 PCIe lanes. 27 PCIe lanes in total.

My motherboard choice, the GIGABYTE GA-AX370-GAMING 5, appears to have enough ports and slots to fill 63 PCIe lanes until you study the limitations.

I am offended because encouraging me, a customer, to buy expensive hardware to fill incompatible ports and slots seems unkind. (Why do we always have to read the fine print?).


I think you are forgetting the CPU has its own PCIe lanes. Regardless of if you are buying Intel or AMD you need to add the CPU's PCIe lanes to those of the chipset before you get the total number of useable PCie lanes available.

I don't recall seeing hard info on the number of PCIe lanes Ryzen offers, but you can expect it to be 16 minimum which is all you need for 8+8 SLI or Crossfire.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:41 am

BadSweetums wrote:
My motherboard choice, the GIGABYTE GA-AX370-GAMING 5, appears to have enough ports and slots to fill 63 PCIe lanes until you study the limitations.

I am offended because encouraging me, a customer, to buy expensive hardware to fill incompatible ports and slots seems unkind. (Why do we always have to read the fine print?)

My best choices appear to be one x16 3.0 video card, one M.2 x4 3.0 drive, any Gen 2.0 x4 PCIe device, or M.2 drive; and up to three Gen 2.0 PCIe x1 devices, if they can fit in with the other hardware. (my most likely choice for a Gen 2.0 x4 device is an x16 video card serving as a dedicated physics card.)

I am underwhelmed. I wanted x32 SLI/Crossfire, with simultaneous NVME RAID0. I wanted more.

Ryzen is good within limitations. I desire more but I will buy what is available if it makes sense. It has a lot to offer, just not 63 Gen 3.0 PCIe lanes.

If AMD survives, maybe future products will offer chipzilla a serious challenge. As I have already said, this is good; but I want more.


Video cards do benefit from faster slots, but only a little. Unless you are swapping huge textures all the time, even 4x is quite close to 16x because the whole point of 8GB VRAM is to avoid using the PCIe at all costs. Plus many new games will pre-load textures in an intelligent manner and hide the latency. So, running two 8x SLI/CF is almost identical to two 16x cards. The M.2 drives are much faster in disk-intensive workloads, but the differences in consumer workloads (load an application, a game level) are often minimal. You really need to understand the kind of work you are doing. If you are loading and processing huge video streams, for example, then M.2 is worth it. NVMe RAID0 is even more extreme. Will the CPU keep up? Are you reaching a point of diminishing returns? And if you do need such power, you should consider a separate controller to offload the checksuming and related overhead, otherwise you will need 1 core just to keep up with the RAID array.

As a side note, AMD is in the business to make money and that means offering 99% of the consumers a decent product at an attractive price. What you describe is only useful to the 1% that is probably better off buying a multi-socket Xeon workstation with serious validation and 24/7 support, not a DYI RyZen box. As a business decision, selling RyZen at $800 and adding 128 PCIe lanes would have been terrible...
Image
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Mon Feb 27, 2017 4:14 am

Thanks ptsant. I must agree that I am asking for a Bugatti Chiron when I would be better served by a Kubota, or a small garden tractor.

Kougar, keep your dreams. Do not download the manual. Do not analyze the table labeled "PCIe bandwidth table For RYZEN series processors" on page 29. May the Force be with you.
 
BadSweetums
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Mon Feb 27, 2017 4:46 am

Okay, more is on the way. It is definitely not consumer grade. Definitely PC fantasy league bench racing material.

Search Opteron Naples and watch for links to Vega. Maybe ASUS will do an RoG edition in 2018 for serious high rollers.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Mon Feb 27, 2017 1:37 pm

BadSweetums wrote:
My best choices appear to be one x16 3.0 video card, one M.2 x4 3.0 drive, any Gen 2.0 x4 PCIe device, or M.2 drive; and up to three Gen 2.0 PCIe x1 devices, if they can fit in with the other hardware. (my most likely choice for a Gen 2.0 x4 device is an x16 video card serving as a dedicated physics card.)

I am underwhelmed. I wanted x32 SLI/Crossfire, with simultaneous NVME RAID0. I wanted more.

Ryzen is good within limitations. I desire more but I will buy what is available if it makes sense. It has a lot to offer, just not 63 Gen 3.0 PCIe lanes.

If AMD survives, maybe future products will offer chipzilla a serious challenge. As I have already said, this is good; but I want more.


Modern video cards work well at 4 lanes each, but M.2 drives are a more serious problem, something like 33% average performance loss when only using 2 lanes.

With that in mind, your (extensive) list would boil down to 8+8+4+4+2(4 2.0 devices) or 26 PCIe 3.0 lanes which is quite reasonable and RyZen SKUs have 24 right on the CPU (supposedly), letting alone what's on the chipset.

In other words, your use case is covered. Unless you really want the 1% (or less!) FPS increase of 16-lane cards. I researched this before I got a 5820K - 40 lanes is well beyond overkill and into "can't possibly use them all" territory for almost all PCs.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:44 pm

I think we've covered this, but back to the original question - at this moment, U.2 is useful for an Intel SSD 750 in a 2.5" formfactor, and not much else. I'm sure there will eventually be a successor to the 750, but will it, or any other semi-affordable drive, use U.2 - who knows? For your average workload of Queue Depth 1, it's not really worth it. Some people think the 960 EVO is a stretch in the "is it worth the price for the performance" debate - I think it's about right for a new system drive.
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Tue Feb 28, 2017 8:19 am

Thanks MOSFET; sending the discussion back to my original question reminds me, I did not share the :P spiritual purpose :P of this intellectual exercise when I was sharing my harsh factual soliloquy on what I wanted versus what Ryzen and the X370 Express chip set can provide.

:oops: personal reveal; too old, too fat, too lazy and too smart to celebrate my midlife (64) crisis with a "halo" car (think huge sums of money and time maintaining a strong emotional commitment to an in impractical inanimate object.) I want to assemble a halo system because it's cheaper, because it gives me a warm glow of pride when it "disappears" mundane obstacles to my immediate gratification; because, while I may never inspire a 8) recognizably awesome woman 8) to crave my favor in any meaningful way, I want to be ENVIED. :oops: :evil: :lol: Just a minor attempt to disavow the :x grumpy old man :x who keeps blocking my view in the bathroom mirror. :D

So, Ryzen can be a practical (Ewww!!) Halo system. The scarcity of PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes makes every choice :o impactful. :o Three, or four, Titan Xs; ahhh, nope. Good way to support the PC hardware manufacturing and supply chain but a lot like trying to move five gallons of gasoline using a a shot glass.

One Titan X, we're done here. Anything left ain't worth picking up. 8) Two sammy 960's in the convenient 2280 size for NVME RAID 0? Not a good idea, M.2_2 will throttle M.2_1 to PCIe Gen 2.0 x4 lane speed. :o Choke

M.2_1 and done, let that baby scream unrestricted at PCIe Gen 3.0 x4 lane speed. And, the extra long 22110 size is perfectly okay. Intel 750 U.2 drive? I don't believe in miracles; but, I might use it instead. If, someone threw one in thru the open window of my Grand Marquis. (please do not break glass, please)

Buzz Lightyear/Inspectors Gadget and Clouseau or any other one person engine of destruction surveys the carnage, straightens and leaves. Carefully not seeing anything not wonderful.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Tue Feb 28, 2017 9:01 am

BadSweetums wrote:
Thanks MOSFET; sending the discussion back to my original question reminds me, I did not share the :P spiritual purpose :P of this intellectual exercise when I was sharing my harsh factual soliloquy on what I wanted versus what Ryzen and the X370 Express chip set can provide.

:oops: personal reveal; too old, too fat, too lazy and too smart to celebrate my midlife (64) crisis with a "halo" car (think huge sums of money and time maintaining a strong emotional commitment to an in impractical inanimate object.) I want to assemble a halo system because it's cheaper, because it gives me a warm glow of pride when it "disappears" mundane obstacles to my immediate gratification; because, while I may never inspire a 8) recognizably awesome woman 8) to crave my favor in any meaningful way, I want to be ENVIED. :oops: :evil: :lol: Just a minor attempt to disavow the :x grumpy old man :x who keeps blocking my view in the bathroom mirror. :D

So, Ryzen can be a practical (Ewww!!) Halo system. The scarcity of PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes makes every choice :o impactful. :o Three, or four, Titan Xs; ahhh, nope. Good way to support the PC hardware manufacturing and supply chain but a lot like trying to move five gallons of gasoline using a a shot glass.

One Titan X, we're done here. Anything left ain't worth picking up. 8) Two sammy 960's in the convenient 2280 size for NVME RAID 0? Not a good idea, M.2_2 will throttle M.2_1 to PCIe Gen 2.0 x4 lane speed. :o Choke

M.2_1 and done, let that baby scream unrestricted at PCIe Gen 3.0 x4 lane speed. And, the extra long 22110 size is perfectly okay. Intel 750 U.2 drive? I don't believe in miracles; but, I might use it instead. If, someone threw one in thru the open window of my Grand Marquis. (please do not break glass, please)

Buzz Lightyear/Inspectors Gadget and Clouseau or any other one person engine of destruction surveys the carnage, straightens and leaves. Carefully not seeing anything not wonderful.


Hey, nice project you have and much more likely to get hours of use than a sports car.

You do know nVidia will announce the 1080Ti very soon? Get that instead of the Titan. Or wait for Vega and the (probable) price drops.
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If you want the fastest possible storage, Intel DC P3700 PCIe. It will last decades. Though if you are moving in that price point (~$1.5 per GB) you might want to wait for Intel Optane or however it is called (I haven't exactly understood what it does, but supposedly it is a new tier of storage between RAM and SSD).
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Tue Feb 28, 2017 9:12 am

BadSweetums wrote:
One Titan X, we're done here. Anything left ain't worth picking up. 8)
NVidia is due to announce the GeForce GTX1080Ti less than 13 hours from now. A slightly cut-down version of the GP102 GPU will offer most of the performance of the Titan X (2016 Pascal) for a much less insane price.
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Tue Feb 28, 2017 3:47 pm

Thanks guys. I'll be running the same story in system builders anonymous soon. Or, just let it die until the hardware hits the streets and I actually build it.

Ryzen is impressive even with its' sensible limitations. I wish it allowed a more extreme working build; but I doubt quadrupling my planned RAM to 64 GB would make a meaningful improvement.
 
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Tue Feb 28, 2017 4:48 pm

Why wouldn't you use 16 GiB DIMMs?
$220 2x16 GiB PC4-25600 G.Skill F4-3200C15D-32GTZ (DDR4-3200, 15-15-15-35, 1.35 V)
The CAS 14 stuff is more expensive.
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Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Wed Mar 01, 2017 5:06 am

i7-8700K, H100i v2, RoG Strix Z370-G Gaming, 16 GiB, RX Vega64, Define Mini-C, SSR-850PX, C32HG70, RK-9000BR, MX518
 
BadSweetums
Gerbil
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Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:52 pm

Re: Ryzen X370 Build - U.2 interface

Wed Mar 01, 2017 6:52 am

I was closer to reality than I knew when I added my exit line about one person engines of destruction. Please accept this correction and my most unworthy apology for any difficulties endured because:

1) I cited the wrong motherboard manual. Please update references to Gigabyte's Aorus GA-X370-GAMING 5 to actually refer to MSI's X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM.

2) I cited the wrong page, the good (horrifying truth) table is on page 30, not page 29.

At least I got the table info correct and the table title.

I apologize for allowing my enthusiasm to surpass my control of my references

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