Nvidia says GeForce 8800 cards are PCIe compliant

Yesterday, we spotted a report by The Inquirer that talked of compatibility problems between GeForce 8800-series graphics cards and some motherboards. The report suggested that the compatibility problems arose because the cards weren’t fully PCI Express compliant. Indeed, the PCI Special Interest Group’s compliant components list lacked (and still lacks) mention of any GeForce 8800 or G80 products. However, Nvidia has now contacted us with word that the cards have in fact passed certification. The company says it submitted its new cards for PCI SIG certification last month, and that the cards will pop up on the certified list “as soon as the SIG administration processes the paper work.” The list, Nvidia says, “generally takes a month or two to be updated.”

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    • Wintermane
    • 13 years ago

    And what happens if as nvidia says it is compliant? Whos to blame then?

      • Shintai
      • 13 years ago

      The problem is, when/if they get on, it can just aswell be a new revision that gets certified and not the first one. Marketing at its best.

        • jimveta
        • 13 years ago

        Definitely a possibility. The NF4 chips had three revisions and the first two were certainly not fully spec compliant.

      • wierdo
      • 13 years ago

      The Wii of course!

    • ew
    • 13 years ago

    Thank you current 8800 owners for participating in nvidia’s public beta program. I appreciate the effort and money you spent in discovering the compatibility problems before the launch product arrives.

    • redpriest
    • 13 years ago

    I have to back up Shintai on this – it’s total BS that nVidia gets a pass on this. Not only that – but their current drivers are buggy as s@#$. Can we say stuttering stanley on games? How about memory clocks not being initialized properly? No Vista drivers? No support for HDCP over *Dual-DVI*?

    nVidia has a ways to go with 8800. It’s obvious that it was rushed out the door. (I have 2 of them in SLI and am not happy that I paid $1400 for a beta product).

      • Proesterchen
      • 13 years ago

      As a fellow GTX owner, I whole-heartedly agree with your stance on the driver quality, nVidia has seriously dropped the ball on that and I wish they’d shown more improvements since the launch.

      However, with this whole PCIe compliancy story line, I don’t think the fact that the G80 has yet to appear on the SIG’s website, which is what the recent line of TheInq articles has been based on mostly, and what nVidia chalks up to some administrative delay, is any kind of proof that problems exist with G80’s PCIe interface implementation.

        • LoneWolf15
        • 13 years ago

        Now there’s a post I can agree with.

        nVidia’s drivers are about 80% working right now, IMO. They run 3D games, but there’s texture-bugs in plenty of those games. The 97.44 drivers are a bloody mess, so most people (myself included) have backed down to the 97.02’s, which work right most of the time.

        I’d have been fine with nVidia waiting an extra month to release the G80 if it meant better drivers, but I’m sure holiday sales spurred its early release. The hardware looks good, but the drivers look kind of like the math homework a smart but lazy kid hurried up and did two hours before classtime. I like my 8800GTS, but I expected more. I also wish (remind me not to wish for the impossible) that review sites actually focused on driver issues; it seems many were too distracted by the performance to comment on driver quality.

        As you said though, all of this doesn’t mean the card has PCIe compliance issues.

    • PRIME1
    • 13 years ago

    r[

      • LoneWolf15
      • 13 years ago

      Bingo. They act like the tech version of “The National Enquirer”.

      In this case, they even used hearsay and content from other sites which they spun out of context to back up a really flimsy “Could this be the case?” (note the lack of factual assertation, common at the Inq) article. Sensationalist rumor-mongering at its finest.

        • Shintai
        • 13 years ago

        Try stick to the facts you are given. Even from one MB maker. Instead of trying to save nVidias ass.

          • LoneWolf15
          • 13 years ago

          Dude…(shakes his head)

          My last two vid-cards were ATI, prior to my current one; both worked great, and I was genuinely happy with them. I’ve owned seven ATI-based cards and seven nVidia-based cards over the years (not counting all the other brands I’ve owned, my first VGA card was an ATI VGA Wonder 512k ISA back in 1992, btw). I have no brand loyalty to ATI nor nVidia; I’ve been happy with one or another at different times, and I’ve seen frustrations and disappointments at others from both as well. My loyalty is to who makes good, working products at good prices.

          Right now, I AM “sticking with the facts I’ve been given”. Which is none. If you read the Inq’s article, NOWHERE has there been a test, or a link, that conclusively proves the problems you are upset about. xBit’s tests that the Inq linked to to justify their “news” were not tests of a PCIe compliance issue, but a graphics card review. The problem they experienced was with a limited amount of product, and they did not assert, or draw the conclusions, that you or the Inquirer are from that test. Did they have a vid-card that wouldn’t boot up in a mainboard? Yes. Did they say “OMG, there must be a PCIe compliance issue?” Did they test further to see if such an issue exists? No. xBit did talk about the resistor issue with some first-run G80 cards, but we all know of that, and that isn’t a PCIe compliance issue. All vendors that shipped such cards are accepting them for RMA replacement.

          And you have done nothing but spew. If you want me to believe what you say, show me some tests performed by a reviewer over multiple mainboards with multiple G80 cards, all from multiple vendors. Don’t tell me “So-and-so and a bunch of others reported a problem on a forum”. This is a good foundation for running some tests to prove your theory, but it isn’t proof. I’ve so far seen enough people whose machine didn’t boot with an 8800 because they weren’t willing to believe that Crazy Larry’s Craptastic power supply wasn’t good enough (but it says 400w on it!) to know that there are more reasons for a system not working, and to start with the more obvious possibilities before going to the further-afield ones.

          You sound like someone who’s in some need of growing up. Give me some evidence, and I’ll listen. Until then, spewing, and calling me an nVidia fanb0i does nothing to make you look like the educated voice of reason. Neither does the voice of the Inquirer, who has often been only too happy to print articles based on rumor and speculation, with no concrete proof.

    • Beomagi
    • 13 years ago

    Or the fault may lie on mobo manufacturers. It was only recently that we had numerous memory problems on both specific am2 and core 2 mobos.

    • Shintai
    • 13 years ago

    LOL! Sure nVidia. Your new rev1.01 might be. But the ones people bought now aint. And a month or two sounds like buying time and hope it goes away. If it passed the test we wouldn´t have the PCI x8 issues etc.

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