Apple, HP LED-backlit notebooks coming soon

Both Apple and HP will introduce notebooks that use LEDs as display backlights in the second quarter of this year, according to a report by DigiTimes. Current LCD monitors use fluorescent lamps as backlights, but LEDs can offer both higher brightness and much better contrast. A company known as BrightSide already uses LED backlights in so-called high dynamic range displays, which can modulate the brightness of individual LEDs behind the LCD panel to achieve contrast ratio ratings of 200,000:1 and brightness ratings of 3,000cd/m².

According to DigiTimes, notebook manufacturers will require brightness ratings of over 1,680cd/m² for their upcoming notebooks—lower than the BrightSide displays’ but still several times that of standard LCD monitors, which are often rated for 200-400cd/m². The site reveals little else about the notebooks, although it does state that HP’s LED-backlit offerings will be high-end multimedia models pre-loaded with Windows Vista.

Comments closed
    • Corrado
    • 13 years ago

    Will this make for a more even back light distribution? I’ve noticed on some of the newer Dell laptops we have here at work (D620) and my iBook G4 and my IBM T43 that if you have a black screen, say a dos prompt, you can see bright spots in the back light due to the location of the lamp itself. If theres LED back lights, would there be more of them scattered around the screen to even out the overall dispersement of light?

    • ripfire
    • 13 years ago

    Screw the notebooks. How about an LCD HDTV that uses LED backlighting..

    • Hance
    • 13 years ago

    increased battery life would be the only thing i would care about. i normally have to set the brightness pretty low on my laptop other wise its so bright that it hurts my eyes.

      • tempeteduson
      • 13 years ago

      Indeed, brightness of current displays is more than enough for me. Battery life (and maybe better off-axis viewing) is more important.

    • willyolio
    • 13 years ago

    SED notebooks, on the other hand, are still definitely more than three to five years away…

      • tempeteduson
      • 13 years ago

      I think we’ll find OLED rather than SED on small displays like that of notebooks.

        • willyolio
        • 13 years ago

        i heard that SED also had lower power draw than OLEDs, and that they *should* take over the entire flat-panel market if they ever got launched.

    • gr00vy0ne
    • 13 years ago

    Coming soon? Sony (and Fujitsu for that matter) have been using LED-backlights in their notebooks since the middle of 2006.

      • willyolio
      • 13 years ago

      sony and fujitsu make apple and HP’s notebooks?

    • CasbahBoy
    • 13 years ago

    How about expected lifespan? Will these last considerably longer than fluorescent backlights, and will they decrease in brightness as dramatically as they age?

      • HiggsBoson
      • 13 years ago

      I guess it depends on how hard they’re driving the LEDs in the devices. The lifespan of LEDs can be near infinite or downright Hobbesian depending on how they are driven and how well they are heat sunk.

        • Bauxite
        • 13 years ago

        Theres a LED in a stereo console or something at one of my relatives place thats been powered on ~24/7 since at least 1985 or so…because it was still there this xmas and I distinctly remember seeing it back then. (plus its in some photographs, since that room is where the family pictures end up being taken most of the time)

        All the ancient toys with leds I have that didnt get battery corrosion still work too.

        Now the white leds in my drivebay LCD, I can already tell they’ve faded a bit. I wish the ******* blue ones that got popular in consumer electronics the last few years would do the same thing. (worst one: piercing blue power light on the front of a friggin TV)

          • ludi
          • 13 years ago

          White LEDs are created by pasting a phosphor layer over the junction of a blue LED, and thus have a very real potential to fade over time due to phosphor aging. Other LEDs are emitting directly and thus do not have that same failure mechanism. They usually die due to abuse of some sort.

    • indeego
    • 13 years ago

    How about some high end-business notebook lovingg{?}g

    Anything about weight differences?

      • Dposcorp
      • 13 years ago

      Betcha battery life gets much better as well, 10-20% maybe?

      Weight maybe not a big difference.

        • HiggsBoson
        • 13 years ago

        I wouldn’t bet on it, CFLs are pretty darn efficient.

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