InPhase ships 300GB holographic media

Last summer, Hitachi Maxell promised that first-generation holographic storage media would appear by the end of the year. It seems to have taken a little longer than expected, but The Register reports that InPhase Technologies—the company that co-developed the media with Hitachi Maxell—has begun shipping 300GB holographic discs and compatible drives. Of course, as with any new technology, there’s somewhat of a price premium involved. In this case, InPhase is charging a cool $18,000 for holographic drives and $180 a pop for 300GB holographic discs. Drives can read and write data to the discs at a maximum speed of 20MB/s, roughly the same as a 16X DVD burner. Looking ahead, InPhase plans to release re-writeable holographic discs in 2008 and to bump up the storage capacity of its media to 1.6TB in 2010.

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    • Inkedsphynx
    • 13 years ago

    Why is it every time I read about some new tech being developed here at TR, all the posters start flaming it as being too expensive, or too slow, or this that and the other.

    People! This is a completely new technology. A step forward in the field of data storage. Of course it’s not going to be consumer-level perfection in it’s first iteration.

    People need to pull the heads out of their….. and see things for the step forward they are, instead of saying it’s worthless because they can’t put it in their home PC the day it’s released.

      • Shark
      • 13 years ago

      This technology is not even remotely new.

        • Shark
        • 13 years ago
          • Inkedsphynx
          • 13 years ago

          Then why does this article specifically say “First-generation holographic storage media”.

          Would that not mean ~New?

            • Shark
            • 13 years ago

            It’s new to consumers, not new technology.

            • Inkedsphynx
            • 13 years ago

            Forgive my mistake then. I was under the impression this was new technology.

            It still doesn’t excuse the rampant manner in which people on this site consistently go off and rail on something that’s brand new. I’m glad that those types of attitudes don’t have a real effect on the industry, because if they did, we’d never have any new innovation taking place.

            People need to just relax and give things time.

            • Willard
            • 13 years ago

            Luckily, few if any companies pay attention to forums. Those that do produce “Snakes on a Plane.”

            • provoko
            • 13 years ago

            Seriously. When this thing becomes 100 dollars a drive and the holo cds are dirt cheap everyone’s gonna be backing up their entire torrent collection on one 300gb disc.

            Thats while all the blue-ray suckers bitch about how they need 6x 50gb discs just to fit 300.

    • wierdo
    • 13 years ago

    Another reason to forget Blu-Ray and HD-DVD beside the DRM crutch 😛

    I hope by 2010 the drives will drop in price to around $200, and the media will sell for a couple bucks or so, the current prices are not great when you can get a 100-pack of 4.3gb DVDs for around twenty bucks.

    • Hattig
    • 13 years ago

    If the media truly lasts 50 years, then they will get buyers, even for the first generation write-once technology at that price.

    Of course they had better hope that the drives last 50 years as well!

    By 2010 the costs should have dropped a bit – not massively, but maybe a couple of grand a drive etc, which will bring it into the range of most companies that have non-trivial IT. 1.6TB optical discs might be in consumers hands for $50 a drive and $1 a disc by 2015, maybe a bit earlier for 300GB/600GB variants.

    • Pupitmiser
    • 13 years ago

    Well it came a bit later than they anticipated. About 3 months, but better late than never. As far as media storage goes, I couldn’t help but notice the tests they’ve run on these guys. If this technology really catches then I have no reason not to think that these storage devices will be integral in storing Ultra High Definition Video (7680×4320) in the not too distant future. If you’re curious about this go to §[< http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UHDV<]§

    • Forge
    • 13 years ago

    Hilarious:

    I read the short title on my google homepage, turned to my wife, and said ‘Ha, probably at 20K per drive and 200$ per disc!’. I then clicked the link and scowled.

    My wife didn’t seem to care.

      • provoko
      • 13 years ago

      NEEEEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRD! Haha. Just kidding.

    • Willard
    • 13 years ago

    Finally, someplace the Feds can store all our emails and phone calls.
    Invest in this stock – it’s going nowhere but up.

      • soccergenius
      • 13 years ago

      y[

    • VTOL
    • 13 years ago

    Die Holographic Die!! 😉

    • just brew it!
    • 13 years ago

    Jeez, just use external USB, Firewire, or eSATA hard drives. Cheaper per GB /[

    • quarantined
    • 13 years ago

    Yeah, let me know when the drive is $180 and the discs are $1.80 a pop.

    • Mr Bill
    • 13 years ago

    That holographic drive is expensive but the holographic media cost is 10X lower per Gb than magneto optical disks. Looks like at 50 years, holographic archival lifetime is comparable to magneto optical (~40 years).

      • adisor19
      • 13 years ago

      Unfortunetly, it’s write only for now unlike MO drives. Also, i really doubt they’ll actually make a rewritable version of this anytime soon..

      The capacity should have been way greater then 300GB per disk in order to trully make a splash and ruin BluRay’s future.

      Adi

    • Sargent Duck
    • 13 years ago

    *sings* You say good-by *to Blu-ray and HD-DVD*
    And I say hello.
    Hello, Hello, Hello

    • provoko
    • 13 years ago

    As holographic cd tech becomes mature, it’ll be the primary choice for pc users as a back up optical drive. So in a few years when it’s afforadable we’ll all be saying good bye to blue-ray and even hd-dvd.

    • IntelMole
    • 13 years ago

    By my calculations, that means a single 300 gig disc takes 256 minutes to be written. Until that drive goes up in write speed, is it even worthwhile as a very high end backup medium?

      • bthylafh
      • 13 years ago

      How long would it take to write that much to a bunch of tapes?

        • IntelMole
        • 13 years ago

        Do a bunch of tapes cost $180 a pop? And the drives themselves?

          • bthylafh
          • 13 years ago

          That’s not what you asked, is it?

            • IntelMole
            • 13 years ago

            So because I didn’t state that explicitly as part of what I said, it’s completely irrelevant? I’d say it’s very relevant myself – the only area I can see this drive being useful is in backup because it’s simply going to be too expensive for anything else and without the market penetration to even make it more than a toy on the desktop.

            So it’s going to have to offer much better value for money than the tried and trusted tape drive (who knows, this company could go belly-up halfway through your first backup, that’s a waste of $18k, no?). It’s completely underwhelming for the huge outlay of cash involved in that respect.

          • Lord.Blue
          • 13 years ago

          One of the best tape drives is now going for around $3K, but the holo-media records faster than the tape, and the tapes (the 800GB tapes) are fairly expensive.

        • Peldor
        • 13 years ago

        There are plenty of Ultra160 SCSI tape drives that boast native (uncompressed) transfer rates of 36 MB/s. With more capacity and lower costs.

    • DrDillyBar
    • 13 years ago

    this is a cool tech that needs to cost less.

    • shank15217
    • 13 years ago

    a good media for archival storage. 1.6 tb by 2010 sounds promising.

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