Retail ‘$100 laptop’ to cost $400

Earlier this year, we heard that the One Laptop Per Child project’s XO laptop would become available in the retail market, but that members of the public would have to pay double for the machines—around $300 in total. In essence, retail buyers would be purchasing one system for themselves and one system for a child in the developing world.

The Register now reports that the OLPC project has slapped a name, price tag, and launch date on the scheme. The "Give 1 Get 1" offer is scheduled to kick off on November 12, and it will allow folks in developed countries to take home an XO laptop for the low, low price of $400. Of course, that price will buy both a system for the user and one for "a child in a developing nation."

Folks with philantropic inclinations—or those who really like the XO’s cheerful green-and-white look—might be tempted by the offer, but others may decide to opt for Asustek’s cheaper Eee PC instead. According to reports we heard last month, the Eee PC is on track to ship this month, and it will be available at prices ranging from $199 to $369.

Comments closed
    • Hance
    • 12 years ago

    If i could get one for 150 say I would think about it. That way when my 4 year old trashed his laptop I wouldnt be out that much money. 400 is more than I am will to spend on a toy I know is going to get broken though.

    • Grast
    • 12 years ago

    I have a better idea. Rather than giving kids in third world countries computers, We should rather try to fix some of the more pressing concerns; war, basic sanitation, and basic education. This whole idea is stupid.

    So many other better ways to spend money on developing countries.

    • TO11MTM
    • 12 years ago

    And all Market relevance goes Kaput…

    • WallisHall
    • 12 years ago

    Yes, this looks like the normal bait and switch of all people who claim to help those who are poor, discriminated against and plain out to steal everything you work for and give it to the druggie down the street.

      • willyolio
      • 12 years ago

      i’m sure that’s how MIT gets all their research funds.

      • Lord.Blue
      • 12 years ago

      Please think a little before making a snide remark like this.

    • orthogonal
    • 12 years ago

    I’m sure there’s someone out there looking for a large tax-write off that would love to donate money for those laptops.

    Then you could charge 1/2 the price to consumers and open the doors to many others who would still have a hard time coming up with $400.

    • Vrock
    • 12 years ago

    I LOL’d.

    You can get a real, no-kidding laptop with novel things like a hard disk drive and a *gasp* optical drive for about that much. Only the philanthropic and/or idiotic need purchase one of these toys at retail.

      • Swampangel
      • 12 years ago

      What you can’t get is a real, no-kidding, ultraportable, ruggedized laptop with very low power consumption for $400. I’m sure there’s someone out there with a non-stupid reason for buying one of these.

      It must be an awfully small niche, though. I’m definitely more interested in an Eee for myself.

        • Vrock
        • 12 years ago

        You’re right, you can’t get it. Anywhere. The OLPC sure doesn’t fit those criteria.

          • willyolio
          • 12 years ago

          wow. you think the OLPC is just a toy? it was designed, first and foremost, to be exceptionally durable and long-lasting, as well as have an ultra-low power consumption.

            • ew
            • 12 years ago

            Not to mention it has a screen that can be read in direct sunlight.

          • Swampangel
          • 12 years ago

          Sorry, I should have said more simply that you can’t get any ultraportable, ruggedized notebook for $400.

          My point is that for some people, portability and durability will be more important than processing power and an optical drive.

          For these people, a $400 “real, no-kidding” laptop may not fit their needs, but the $400 OLPC might. Maybe it’s a bad value in terms of the hardware you’re getting. But it might still be a better value than, say, the $2500 ruggedized laptops used at my last job, if that extra computing power is unnecessary.

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