Intel opens first volume 45nm fab in Arizona

As AMD attemps to reassure investors and analysts by saying 45nm processor production will kick off in the first half of next year, Intel is already on the last lap of its race to 45nm. The world’s biggest processor maker plans to release its first 45nm processors next month, and the company has opened its first fabrication plant dedicated specifically to high-volume 45nm production.

The new plant is situated in Chandler, Arizona, and Intel has christened it "Fab 32." Production of 45nm processors for desktops, notebooks, and servers has already begun there. According to Intel, Fab 32 is the company’s sixth fab to produce 300mm wafers and its second one to produce 45nm processors. (45nm CPU production started at its D1D development facility in Oregon back in January.)

Intel plans to open two additional 45nm fabs next year: Fab 28 in Kiryat Gat, Israel, and Fab 11x in Rio Rancho, New Mexico.


Intel’s Fab 32. Source: Intel.

For a performance preview of Intel’s 45nm chips and how they stack up against AMD’s quad-core "Barcelona" Opterons, make sure to check our Stoakley platform and 45nm Xeons review. 45nm Xeons are scheduled to become available on November 12.

Comments closed
    • emi25
    • 12 years ago

    TR, can you ask Intel for a visit ? make some pictures, impress us, please ?

    • willyolio
    • 12 years ago

    fab 32 on 45nm process. coming up, fab 22 on 32nm process.

    • rika13
    • 12 years ago

    r[

      • UberGerbil
      • 12 years ago

      Or Made in China
      Or Made in Israel

      Intel has fabs overseas, too, and is building more. When you’re buying Intel, you’re not necessarily buying “Made in America” any more than if you bought from AMD (who is building a fab in NY).

        • rika13
        • 12 years ago

        i always thought dresden bent over backwards to get amd’s business, free land, tax exemption, etc.; but since ibm has the east fishkill fab and they provide most of amd’s fab research, its possible; and made in isreal is kinda cool since the isrealis have some really sweet military gear (merkava iv “ambulance” with the same gun our tanks use and more armor)

          • UberGerbil
          • 12 years ago

          The states bend over backwards to get Intel to build too. AZ, TX, OR, and NM each gave them low or no taxes, land rebates or grants, infrastructure improvements, etc worth hundreds of millions of dollars. WA built freeway offramps and a bunch of other stuff for a fab that Intel eventually didn’t even build.
          §[<http://www.nwlaborpress.org/1999/3-05-99Intel.html<]§ IBM has operations in East Fishkill, but AMD's new plant will be near Albany. And NY is bending over backwards for them, too (to the tune of ~$1.2*[http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1980943,00.asp<]§

      • Stranger
      • 12 years ago

      you’re also forgetting singapore and fishkill, NY if I’m remembering correctly.

      • blastdoor
      • 12 years ago

      I was at the airport in Kansas City yesterday and overheard some guy grumbling to a TSA employee about how “these damn foreigners are ruining this country”. Was that you?

      • Deli
      • 12 years ago

      Does MIA actually mean it will be of better quality? Hmmm. No, I think not.

    • pluscard
    • 12 years ago

    Intel has about 12 fabs, AMD has 2, plus it outsources to chartered and others.

    AMD numbers it’s fabs based on years since AMD started in biz. AMD currently operates Fab30 and Fab36, but will close Fab30 in Jan, and it will re-open as FAB38 with 300mm tools.

    INTC ships 3.2 times as many cpus as AMD worldwide.

    • Gungir
    • 12 years ago

    I don’t think that the fab numbers necessarily correspond to the number that exist.

    • Lord.Blue
    • 12 years ago

    If only AMD had 16 fabs, now Intel has 32? or is this the 32nd one they have built?

      • UberGerbil
      • 12 years ago

      That’s the number of fabs that have been planned over the years. Not all of them got built, and not all of them are currently in use. I’m not sure they’ve ever had more than about a dozen in operation at any one time, and several are on old, old process nodes that are still used for chips that don’t need bleeding edge like top of the market CPUs (until recently you could still buy sub-1GHz P3-based chips, not to mention chipsets and whatnot).

      This article is a couple of years old but it gives a sense of the diversity of manufacturing at Intel:
      §[<http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1558,1772252,00.asp?kc=ETRSS03099TX1K0000636<]§

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