Apple upgrades Mac Pro with 45nm Xeons

Two months in the wake of the launch of Intel’s first 45nm Xeons, Apple has announced new Mac Pro and Xserve systems based around the new chips. As Mac Rumors reports, the new base Mac Pro workstation packs two quad-core 2.8GHz Xeon processors, 2GB of DDR2-800 FB-DIMM memory, an AMD Radeon HD 2600 XT graphics card, and a 320GB 7200RPM Serial ATA hard drive. That machine will set you back a hefty $2,799, but folks with deeper pockets can opt for two quad-core 3.2GHz Xeons, 32GB of DDR2-800 memory, 4TB of internal storage, and Nvidia Quadro FX 5600 graphics.

The new Mac Pro with its side panel popped off. Source: Apple.

Apple has also beefed up its server offering with the introduction of a new Xserve system. Starting at $2,999, the new Xserve includes a single 2.8GHz quad-core Xeon, 2GB of DDR2-800 FB-DIMM memory, an 80GB Serial ATA hard drive, integrated Radeon X1300 graphics, and dual Gigabit Ethernet controllers. The Xserve can be beefed up with two 3GHz quad-core Xeons, up to 32GB of memory, and up to 3TB of storage capacity.

As MacRumors points out, Apple’s decision to release the new Mac Pro and Xserve ahead of the upcoming MacWorld Conference & Expo hints that more new Macs are scheduled to be unveiled at the show. Recent rumors suggest an ultraportable MacBook based on Intel’s new 45nm mobile Core 2 Duo processors will make an appearance. (Thanks to TR reader Tom for the tip.)

Comments closed
    • Xenolith
    • 12 years ago

    When are they going to put quad cores in their minis.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 12 years ago

      When a quad is available in a notebook chip and chipset at around $100/cpu.

    • albundy
    • 12 years ago

    i thought TR said that these new xeons would be “single socket only”?

    • StashTheVampede
    • 12 years ago

    Just follow the money:
    – MORE money is made on notebook parts (chipsets, ram, cpu)
    – MORE money is made on server parts (chipsets, ram, cpu)
    – LESS money is made on desktop parts (chipset, ram, cpu)

    Apple’s margin’s are good BECAUSE they 100% skip desktop parts (chipsets, ram, cpu). Imagine Apple going with some Intel desktop motherboard, Q6600 and 2GB of DDR2 — THAT kind of system’s margin is TINY (look at Dell/HP, etc).

    On the other hand, Apple DOES sell a single socketed Xeon (-$500) of the Mac Pro. Still uses FB-DIMM, still is Apple box.

      • Ethyriel
      • 12 years ago

      Why do you think Apple would magically cut their margin down when they defiantly refuse to do so in other market segments? Dell and HP do the same in those other segments as they do with the desktop, why would Apple suddenly follow suit just because they build a true desktop?

        • StashTheVampede
        • 12 years ago

        In other market segments, they don’t have competition:
        – iMac: few have it, I’ve never seen anyone with an iMac clone
        – Mini: yes, there are a handful of vendors, never seen one at a large brick and mortar store
        – MacBook/Pro: These laptops are MORE akin to Thinkpads than Dells — and are priced as such.
        – Mac Pro: They are “marketing” high-end unix workstations to the home consumer. Dell and HP aren’t doing this.

        The margin’s Apple lives on are nice. If they went desktop parts and tried to keep the margins, you’d probably see a cannibalization of the Mac Pro market — which would be against Apple making money.

        Would they make it up in volume? Only if they were willing to be sold in Circuit City, Best Buy, Walmart, etc — which is NOT going to happen. Apple is selling a “brand”, they do NOT want to get heavily associated with brick and mortar stores (yes, they are in Best Buy).

          • d0g_p00p
          • 12 years ago

          Sorry, but a mac is not “high-end unix workstation” Just because the underpinnings are BSD based does not make it a unix workstation. If I were to give my unix admin’s a mac pro and tell them, “here is your new unix box” not only would they laugh in my face, but my pink slip would not surprise me.

          Also, there is a market for Xserves other than Pixar?

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 12 years ago

    /[

      • derFunkenstein
      • 12 years ago

      Only for gamers.

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 12 years ago

        Well yeah I know it’ll never be used for gaming, but as an enthusiast at heart, it just breaks my heart to see something so powerful limited so heavily in that one component.

        It’s like seeing a 700hp Lingenfilter Corvette Z06 limited by a governer or a chevy big block on a Charger without a blower.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 12 years ago

          If it’s not going to be used for gaming, then the video card is perfect – accelerated HD video playback, Core Image acceleration, dual-link DVI, and plenty of VRAM for big displays. For video pros using Final Cut Studio, or for audio pros using Logic/Soundtrack, graphic designers using Adobe…for just about everyone who needs alot of CPU and RAM power/capacity, this is the awesomest bundle of awesome in this awesome world of ours.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 12 years ago

      Hah, you should see the imbalance in a server I’ve got down stairs, 2x4x2.66ghz C2 Xeons with some single-chip fanless faceless nameless ATI thing. Or I think its ATI, maybe its not even. Who cares?

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 12 years ago

        Are you running a spam operation from home or something?

          • Anonymous Coward
          • 12 years ago

          No I’m at work. But anyway I see plenty of reasons for “professional” machines to combine a small graphics card with a lot of CPUs and RAM.

    • blastdoor
    • 12 years ago

    These super high end unix workstations are nice, but I wish they would sell a Pro-level *desktop* computer. Even if it’s not the “xMac” in a nifty form-factor, just a single socket Mac Pro with regular RAM would be a welcome addition to the product lineup.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 12 years ago

      It would cannibalize the high margin’s that Apple is enjoying. Nice try though, keep asking.

        • Thresher
        • 12 years ago

        At one time, I would have agreed with you, but when your initial configuration for your “Pro” line has two quad core Xeons and your highend consumer level model has a dual core single socket, there is a ton of market space in the middle to work with without cannibalizing sales of either segment. Basically, at this point, they’ve pretty much thrown away the segment between $1700 and $2200. Seems kind of silly to me.

          • Kurlon
          • 12 years ago

          You can get the Mac Pro with a single quad core cpu installed, which whacks $500 off the base price. ($2299)

        • derFunkenstein
        • 12 years ago

        You’re saying that they couldn’t charge enough to get their same % margin on a consumer-level tower?

          • StashTheVampede
          • 12 years ago

          Yes. Apple also doesn’t want to regularly “drop” prices or “upgrade” hardware on the same desktop parts. RAM and CPU prices drop, regularly — this causes supply issues with their vendors. Apple would get into the same game as HP/Dell and sell those pieces at a “loss”.

          Only a few have survived the OEM world, Apple is avoiding it, 100%.

    • leor
    • 12 years ago

    2800 isn’t even that bad for a workstation of that quality. apple moving to intel was one of the best moves they’ve ever made. at least their claims of the most powerful computers out there actually measure up now.

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