Shuttle intros $199 kPC

Shuttle has scores of small form factor systems on display at CES, but the most interesting is easily a budget kPC system that will sell for $199. Sub-$200 systems are actually becoming more common these days, but the kPC’s small, stylish form factor is certainly unique in this segment. Shuttle has based the kPC on a Mini ITX chassis that includes a Celeron 420 processor, Intel 945G chipset, 60-80GB hard drive, 512MB of DDR2 memory, and a 100W power supply. Cooling will be provided by Intel’s stock processor heatsink, although users will have the option of upgrading to Shuttle’s own ICE cooler.

To keep costs down, the kPC will run a version of Ubuntu Linux. Users will also be free to install the OS of their choice. Those looking to roll their own hardware will be able to purchase the system as a traditional small form factor barebones for only $99, as well.

The kPC design isn’t quite finalized, and Shuttle is currently grappling with whether it will include an external 5.25″ optical bay. A PCI Express expansion slot should make it into the final revision, though. Expect to see the kPC show up at retailers like Newegg and Fry’s within the next couple of months.

Comments closed
    • indeego
    • 12 years ago

    Nice idea. Too bad it’s shuttle, though. I don’t like their CPU fans. Have had two dieg{<.<}g

    • flip-mode
    • 12 years ago

    Hey, I’d be interested in a barebones of this thing.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 12 years ago

      i would too, but i’d rather have a 200-250W PSU for it, so I could put in a relatively low-power GPU (2600Pro with a fanless heatsink that wraps around or otherwise works past a dual-slot problem most Shuttles have) with a higher-end CPU (C2D 6850, there or there abouts) for awesome HD playback and super-low noise without putting a >75% load on the PSU all the time.

        • eitje
        • 12 years ago

        If I had to guess, I’d say they’re using a Morex PSU, or something equivalent, to get that 100W. With that said, there might be a way to switch up to a beefier PSU with little trouble.

        Oh, I can’t wait to get my hands on one of these!

    • Shinare
    • 12 years ago

    Add $50 to the barebones and have 1) optical bay and 2) 450W PSU.

    I’d buy 2 at the least for HTPC’s. That thing looks slick.

      • eitje
      • 12 years ago

      i can’t even begin to imagine what you’d pair a 450W PSU with that has a mITX form factor.

      • dragmor
      • 12 years ago

      Why would you need anywhere near 450w?

      My SN95G5 with 3500+, 1GB, 6600GT, 2xHD, 1xDVD uses less than 120w at full CPU and GPU load.

      I’ve built several (8) SK22G2 using 3800×2, 2gb ram, 1xHD, 1xDVD and onboard sound and video that use less than 60w full load.

        • bthylafh
        • 12 years ago

        q[

    • BeowulfSchaeffer
    • 12 years ago

    It’s too big…, seriously, they should upgraded and reduce the price of their SD02XD, or put out something along the lines of the ASUS P3-P5G33.

    • Lord.Blue
    • 12 years ago

    I’d put the Radeon HD2400 or HD2600 passive in this thing in a heartbeat. Couple that with a 750GB hdd….and hello media center!

      • DASQ
      • 12 years ago

      On a 100w PSU?

        • eitje
        • 12 years ago

        sure – there’s plenty of hardware that’ll fit in a 100W envelope. I have a mITX system @ home running with a GeForce 6200 PCI that only pulls about 50W using an 80W power adapter.

      • d0g_p00p
      • 12 years ago

      yup, that is what I am going to do. I have a early Shuttle box (SV24) and it has been doing HTPC/emulation duties. It’s time to upgrade with something current and this seems to fit perfectly. I am getting the barebones model and going from there.

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 12 years ago

    Without the optical bay, your options are a wee bit too limited with this one.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 12 years ago

      external drives would fix that…USB2.0 is plenty for optical.

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 12 years ago

        Uh, you sure? USB 2.0 is sufficient for reading/writing to either CD or DVD formats at maximum speed? I’m skeptical.

          • anand
          • 12 years ago

          A 20X DVD burner is writing at 27 MB/s. The theoretical maximum speed of USB2.0 is 60 MB/s. So USB has the bandwidth to handle it though of course, poorly implemented chipsets probably cut that maximum bandwidth down.

          Anyway, I think eSATA is probably the way to go regardless. I don’t know if any external DVD/CD drives are available in eSATA yet but I hope they are coming if not.

            • UberGerbil
            • 12 years ago

            That’s correct (1x CD is 150KB/s; 1x DVD is 9x CD, so 150 * 9 * 20 = 27MB/s). Even with USB overhead, it shouldn’t be limited. Maximum transfer is only achieved on the outer tracks; opticals are recorded from the inside out, so the max speed isn’t hit unless the disc is full and most of the disc is transfered at a lower rate anyway.

            It might be possible to put a SATA optical into an external drive case that supports eSATA, but I wouldn’t count on it unless somebody actually did it.

            • just brew it!
            • 12 years ago

            Even if inefficient USB implementations cut into the maximum bandwidth a bit, it isn’t the end of the world. So what if your 20x DVD burner ends up running at an effective speed of 15x? I generally back off on the burn speed anyway, because it tends to result in a more reliable burn.

            • ssidbroadcast
            • 12 years ago

            Well there we have it. I’ll yield to higher technical wisdom.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 12 years ago

            and even then, even then…the USB2.0 HDD my wife recently got for backups writes (according to hdtach) at 35MB/s, which is slower than if it’s on SATA, but >20% faster than the current max DVD speed.

            • MadManOriginal
            • 12 years ago

            eSATA and SATA are the same signals, just different connectors. There are eSATA-SATA cables so all you’d need is a SATA optical which are common and you’d be able to hook it up with no problem at all, you’d just need a power cable as well.

            For $99 the barebones is a pretty nice deal, what’s that include, case mobo and PSU?

    • eitje
    • 12 years ago

    i wish there was more than just front pictures of this thing… I’d really like to see what the backports look like, and what kind of PSU they’re using.

    Can we get something like that, Geoff?

      • alex666
      • 12 years ago

      Along with something in the foreground for perspective, say, a credit card, something.

        • eitje
        • 12 years ago

        some other folks have estimated, using the size of the screws as a reference point, the size. it’s supposedly slightly smaller than the standard flexATX G5s.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This