Infinity Ward laments Call of Duty 4 piracy

Call of Duty series developer Infinity Ward has joined a growing list of companies to cite piracy as one of the reasons for the PC’s fall from grace as a gaming platform. As Shacknews reports, the company’s Community Relations Manager—who calls himself Fourzerotwo—has posted on his blog to express his amazement at the number of people who have pirated his studio’s latest title, Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare. Prefacing his comment by the heading, "They Wonder Why People Don’t Make PC Games Any More," Fourzerotwo explains:

On another PC related note, we pulled some disturbing numbers this past week about the amount of PC players currently playing Multiplayer (which was fantastic). What wasn’t fantastic was the percentage of those numbers who were playing on stolen copies of the game on stolen / cracked CD keys of pirated copies (and that was only people playing online).
Not sure if I can share the exact numbers or percentage of PC players with you, but I’ll check and see; if I can I’ll update with them. As the amount of people who pirate PC games is astounding. It blows me away at the amount of people willing to steal games (or anything) simply because it’s not physical or it’s on the safety of the internet to do.

Last year, both Epic Games and id Software said they were dragged into console development as a result of PC piracy. Former Ritual Entertainment QA Manager Michael Russell told Shacknews in an interview two years ago that he had seen studios close and people "lose their homes" as a result of piracy. Russell, too, named piracy as one of the reasons PC game developers were moving to consoles.

Luckily for the folks at Infinity Ward, piracy didn’t stop the PC version of Call of Duty 4 from hitting the number-one spot on the PC game charts earlier this month. According to the NPD numbers, CoD 4 pushed Blizzard’s ever-popular World of Warcraft to the number-two spot and EA’s The Sims 2 Deluxe into third place.

Comments closed
    • towcheeze
    • 12 years ago

    Piracy isn’t so much the problem. Piracy has been there since the beginning. I think the biggest issues are:

    1. Big corporations running the show. They need huge returns. PC gaming roots has come from the small developer creating new unique “fun” games. These long time developers who have tied themselves to big name publishers have lost sight of that. How much overhead is involved with a company like ID or IFW. PC games have never known to be multi million dollar endeavors well in the olden days anyway. Big corps expect to get gallons of blood from a stone when it was never there to begin with.

    2. Lack or originality. Again big business churning out the same old same old stuff. How many times can people go on military missions before they are sick of it whether it be WW2, current day, future?

    3. I believe it was an Epic dev who said Intel hurt pc gaming the most with the weak 3D performance of its onboard video chipset. The forums I perused flamed him. I think he had a point. In order to be a pc gamer these days you have to at the minimum make sure you have a decent videocard. The majority of systems the average person owns have weak gaming performance. Why do you think Sims continues to sell well. It doesn’t require much video power to run it. Bascially the hardware has outpaced mainstream. Guess we have Nvidia and ATi to thank for pushing upgrades every 6+ months.

    With that I still believe pc gaming will survive. Last year was a fantastic year for pc gaming and the year ahead looks as promising. The current consoles, the ps3 and xbox 360 are nothing more than snapshots of pc hardwares past. If nothing else these “dedicated gaming pcs” are pc gamings future. The only sad part is the hardware is stagnant for 4+ years. Boring to a hardcore pc gamer who also enjoys the process of upgrading/building/modding/tweaking their pcs along with gaming aspect.

    I owned every console except for the 360. There is a reason pc gaming survives. Its just a much more enjoyable platform to play on. I continually try to play my consoles but I end up playing on my pc 95% of the time. The atmosphere and control scheme is so much better. Plus the cost of pc games being up to half of what it costs on the consoles also help 🙂

      • pixel_junkie
      • 12 years ago

      Personally I loved the game Far Cry which came from an unknown little company called Crytek (I know, some ppl hated the plastic palms, but I thought the game play was great and the AI was way ahead of the curve). Interestingly enough they used pirated software to create this FPS banking on payday to settle any lawsuits…which they easily did. I only wish they hadn’t sold out to EA and stayed an independent player in todays ever-shrinking list of game developers. But that’s just me.

    • Bensam123
    • 12 years ago

    You buy what you can pay for. If someone pirates a game and they don’t have money for it, they don’t buy it. If someone likes a game they’ll buy it if they have money for it. If someone doesn’t have money for a game then they won’t buy it.

    Even if someone likes a game and doesn’t have money for it, they wont buy it. If they have enough money for it they will buy it. Publishers aren’t losing money where there isn’t money in the first place. It’s like saying they’ll get money from nothing.

    There is a small percentage of people who just steal cause they can. Most aren’t in a financial position to own the game. Poor college student, kid living in parents basement, what have you.

    What game developers truly underestimate is the amount of advertising and spread of mouth they get from people just playing their game. I know for a fact that I wouldn’t have played Dawn of War (cause I never heard of it) in the first place without randomly downloading the ‘demo’. I now own the game and play it with my friends quite often.

    Then again piracy also seems spread the word that a game sucks balls like wild fire, cause people don’t buy a game randomly and play it for five minutes, then going “wow, this game sucks” and feel like they were cheated out of their monies. There are countless PC games which just suck and aren’t worth my greens. I never would’ve known if I didn’t try the ‘demo’ first.

    • endothermal
    • 12 years ago

    I challenge their statistics, simply because as we all know there are only 3 types of lies; lies, damn lies and statistics. First and foremost a cracked copy of the game != a lost sale. Many people myself included routinely have to turn to cracks to be able to play the game without the damn DVD or CD in the drive. Also not to mention, Wii, PSP, XBOX 1, PS2, PS1 have had mod chips and the ability to play copied games for years and that clearly hasn’t made the consoles less lucrative. Basically it’s a bogus argument they are making. It’s true there may be “pirated” copies of the game out there but it certainly isn’t a PC only thing. I live close to the pacific mall and I can tell you when it comes to consoles there is large scale commercial piracy taking place. You can walk in the mall and by burned copies of games and movies, that is rather common place, but you can also buy fully pressed shrink wrapped copies of games that unless you looked closely you wouldn’t be able to tell are pirated copies. To this date I have yet to see any PC games get the same treatment.

    • funkymunky
    • 12 years ago

    My girlfriend gave me Dark Messiah as part of my Christmas box. The stupid Securom prevented me from replaying after I quit. I had to restart the PC to play again. As you can think it can get quite annoying, especially if you are busy tweaking the game (my GFX card is an old creaking AGP GF6800). So I HAD TO go to a website (with ‘world’ in the title) to get the cracked exe. Problem solved. I don’t have internet at home (it is impractically expensive around here), but I think Steam is a good idea, only if you don’t need to download a lot of updates, just activation (I use my cellphone’s 3G to activate other software).

    How about Microsoft creates a plugin in their next DirectX that creates an online activation service like Steam? The games on Steam needs it to run, how about they create the games to need their service to run? Or how about everyone just use Steam, but once again, only for activation, the updates should be optional, the games come playable out of the box save for activation. Steam/DXplugin could be implemented to notify you of new drivers/patches and such. The service should be lightweight and stoppable through its interface. Parental controls can be in this service too. I know Vista has such an option, why don’t MS expand on that? Put this in the next DX release for XP too.

    I mean Steam is quite difficult to crack, why don’t publishers run with that concept? Why don’t they create such a system. They should have a unified system, that is why I suggest MS, since Windows & DirectX is the common denominator.

      • DrDillyBar
      • 12 years ago

      Actually, I quite frequently use ‘world’ with games I own (and the occational I don’t).

      • FubbHead
      • 12 years ago

      I like how Company Of Heroes works. If you sign up and login with your key when you start the game, you won’t need the disc. Otherwise you do (or so it says anyway, I kind of signed up right away).

      It won’t help against piracy much, but they at least care for the customer.

    • cegras
    • 12 years ago

    Solution: release through Steam. You can’t pirate Steam, unless you physically steal a valid key. But piracy is impossible through Steam. That’s why Orange Box hasn’t been pirated : P

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 12 years ago

      lol! I could post a link to prove you wrong, but that’s against TR policy.

      • VTOL
      • 12 years ago

      What are you talking about? You could just download cracked steam games and not have to use steam at all.

        • A_Pickle
        • 12 years ago

        Multiplayer? And what’s to stop Valve from requiring a hook for the game to actually work? Or stopping them from having the game code itself phone home every so often online?

          • VTOL
          • 12 years ago

          Hence why I said cracked and obviously you couldn’t do MP.

    • green
    • 12 years ago

    doing a quick search on [known bt search engine] shows that at this time there are ~85000 people downloading the image of call of duty 4 for pc
    count the seeders who have finished downloading and this number goes to ~90000
    this says nothing of how many people that have already finished downloading it and are no longer on the trackers
    it’s impossible to tell how many of those people would have bought the game had that version not been made available (big business would says all of them. i would say 1 in 50)
    but either way when you look at those numbers and think of the private trackers that don’t allow scraping, what else can IW do but cry about the fact that releasing the game on the pc was quite futile

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 12 years ago

    All I saw here was, “BOO HOO, BOO HOO HOO, BOO HOO HOO HOOOO!”.

    Who friggin cares anymore. Really.
    I don’t pirate or condone it, but when the industry constantly charges 50/60$ for a pile of steaming beta crap, what do they expect?

    Most new games have no replay value, no COOP, poor gameplay, dumbed down content, chock full of nasty spyware/DRM/in game ads/cd checks/activation,(which makes it far more appealing to just pirate a cracked version), and are released full of show stopping bugs (eg: Supcom:FA’s AI has severe issues), etc.

    I could write a huge essay on all the stuff I don’t like, and frankly I don’t care for the way the industry is now.
    As long as they keep screwing paying customers, and charging high prices, they aren’t going to get any sympathy from me.
    I buy most of my games used/on sale now, since they certainly aren’t worth the 50-60$ retail.

    ps. How hard is it for them to properly implement a cd-key check for multiplayer?
    Talk about total beta release, they should fire the guy responsible for the faulty key-check.

    • rechicero
    • 12 years ago

    If Steamis the future, I prefer the past. I’ve recently received The Orange Box and, as I had Half Life 2, I gave it away to a neighbor, but he has to jump through a lot of hoops and pay again to play.

    It’s my property, I paid for it, I should be able to give it away if I want. But no, Steam prevent me to do it. Those abuses turn you to piracy…

    Edit: Steam for Valve

      • DrDillyBar
      • 12 years ago

      When I got the Orange Box, I was able to gift my previous versions of HL2 and Ep1 easily to my Brother in law for christmas. He just needed a Steam account to recieve it. Hardly painful.

        • rechicero
        • 12 years ago

        Please, tell me how… The CD-KEY is already used and I can’t find anyway to free it but sending the original copy of the CD-KEY and 10$ (reset CD-KEY). I’d be very grateful if you could tell me how to transfer a CD-KEY in Steam (and Steam would be a fair plataform)

        Thanks in advance

          • DrDillyBar
          • 12 years ago

          Hope this works: nope…

          Orange Box Gift Subscriptions. Search Steampowered.com’s support section for that topic. URL didn’t work. 😉

            • rechicero
            • 12 years ago

            First, thanks a lot, that really helped in my particular case.

            But about the Steam-Piracy topic. If I hadn’t the Orange Box, could I give away Half Life 2? And if the answer is “no”, how can it be that “fair” use?

            Steam should let you unregister a CD-KEY. Period. If they don’t it’s just another DRM crap system (at least IMHO). DRM should stop piracy without hinder paying customer. Legit users should have some added value over pirates, but, right now, pirates enjoy less intrusive products than customers.

      • A_Pickle
      • 12 years ago

      What’s to stop people from simply buying the Orange Box and then “giving” it to a friend, who then “gives” it to another friend, who then “gives” it to another? Especially for those single-player games? I could care less about Team Fortress 2, I much prefer Half-Life 2: Deathmatch. And I haven’t played Portal or Half-Life 2: Episode 2 since… I beat them.

      They were awesome, but… well… everyone knows the replayability of Valve’s games. Now maybe if they had a packet-like TTL, where you could give a friend the games, and maybe he could give the games to a friend, but after that he couldn’t… not so bad. But allowing people to give away single-player games? Suicide. People would never buy them.

    • StashTheVampede
    • 12 years ago

    Preventing piracy, for PC games, MUST go the way of the distribution model where EVERY connection is authenticated before playing (similar to Steam).

    Each time the user starts the app, a series of checks are made on local resource to ensure they don’t have “unauthorized addons” and prevent them from playing.

    IW is in the business of making a game — they are NOT in the business of monitoring it’s piracy, authentication and how current the client is. Maybe they should consider a distribution method for the next game — it would help cut down on the # of pirates playing their title.

    • A_Pickle
    • 12 years ago

    Not gonna lie — I’m not a PC pirate, and I am easily frustrated with people who are.

    I hate consoles. I loathe them with a burning passion. I am generally an objective person, willing to see the merits and downfalls of various pieces of IT hardware and software… /[

      • SPOOFE
      • 12 years ago

      “The PC is the perfect console. It can do anything a console can do, and it can do it better.”

      Heard this a million times before, and it’s only true under one very important condition: If you are a PC enthusiast and like building your own hardware. The extra cost and hassle is invisible to such a person, as they perceive that as Fun and Money/Effort they’d spend, anyway.

      Most people don’t like fiddling with hardware, worrying about compatibility, finding patches or upgrades or reading forums or guides or etc. etc. etc. One needs to enjoy that sort of thing – as most people at TechReport probably do – in order to consider the PC as “the perfect console”.

      EDIT:

      /[

        • A_Pickle
        • 12 years ago

        g[

          • SGT Lindy
          • 12 years ago

          Pickle you are right and wrong.

          First and never forget this 98% of software companies/game companies do what they do TO MAKE MONEY. Yes they love what they do, they were probably gamers, and got into it by saying to them selves “I love gaming, I would love making games”. Hey that is great. But they dont spend 40+ hours a day for love only. They do it for money. Their employers are a step further away from love of job and closer to lets make money. There is a lot of money to be maid. Something like 900 million in PC games sales and 13billion in console game sales for 2007?

          Looking at it from a purely, logical business perspective its cheaper to…..

          Create, test, support, CONTROL and update a game on a CLOSED platform. This is a fact that you canNOT deny.

          It is harder….yes harder for joe user to pirate a console game. Especially if you have to modify hardware. Joe user might let his buddy install a hacked PC game….very doubtful Joe will let him crack open his shinny new console.

          So the equation for the software companies goes like this. Console = cheaper production + cheaper support + less piracy = MORE MONEY

          Joe user wants to play games not FRAQ with his PC. Yes its hard to believe for a geek…but a user is a USER. Do they want to chase down the latest video driver that fixes that graphical glitch in their latest PC game. Trying to find the driver? Installing it themselves? Do they want to download a 200meg patch to keep playing their favorite MP game? Find a place that does not have a download that crawls….or pay for for a fast download? NO…NO…NO.

          Joe wants to sit down pop in a game and play. Even better on that new HD set Joe just bought.

          Sure PC’s are better…faster….higher resolutions…more options for types of games because of the mouse and keyboard. That said you have to be technical to keep up with all of that.

          Fact is Joe wants easy gaming, Joe user his PC for certain things but hates to hassle with it. Software companies know this….and console gaming is killing PC gaming because Joe is getting what he wants and he does not want PC games….or console games would have made 900million and PC games would have made 13billion.

          Joe want easy gaming = console gaming
          Software company wants to make the most money for their resource expenditure = console gaming

          PC gaming will never go away. It will shrink further to a certain point, and at some point there will be, from a technology standpoint, no distinction…it will just be electronic games.

          My advice take that $600 you are thinking about spending on some crazy SLI desktop rig, buy a 360 and a dozen games……join the dark side.

          • SPOOFE
          • 12 years ago

          That’s an awful lot of text to state, “The PC is the perfect console, if we ignore all the things that keep it from being the perfect console.”

          I’m glad you think so highly of PC’s, though. Shows spirit.

            • A_Pickle
            • 12 years ago

            All I’m saying is, there is no technical reason for… even the /[

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 12 years ago

            Not having to worry about OS’s or drivers is a huge plus.

    • herothezero
    • 12 years ago

    q[

    • Draxo
    • 12 years ago

    Wat’s nice is the fact that they put so much effort into copy protection that at times works against them. I have played Gothic 3 from a cracked game. I liked it so I decided to buy it. To my surprise the disk failed to install the game and told me to contact tech support and obtain a new one. Needless to say I am playing the cracked game. Thats how effective these copy protections are at turning people into pirates. Why should I buy a game and be punished?

    • herothezero
    • 12 years ago

    This sort of story just brings out the apologists and rationalizers. How many new ways can you excuse theft?

    That said, I thought COD4’s demo was great…played it for about 20 minutes, and it felt like a console port, so I didn’t bother buying the game.

      • Kunikos
      • 12 years ago

      Is it really the exact same thing as theft? Making a duplicate is not the same as taking the source away from the person who owns it. Not saying it’s moral, but it’s not the same thing.

        • A_Pickle
        • 12 years ago

        Why do you play games? To have the experience of playing them. Game developers offer you their time and effort in providing you an experience of playing them, in exchange for some of your capital.

        If you decide to get that experience for free, you may as well call it stealing.

    • swaaye
    • 12 years ago

    Why aren’t they banning people (keys) who are copying their game? Why are they complaining if they voluntarily let these people play?

    • lyc
    • 12 years ago

    > /[

    • StashTheVampede
    • 12 years ago

    Does IW honestly believe they *could* sell that many *more* copies of CoD4? It has sold a few million copies and I’m betting it’s already in an “elite” status of PC games that has sold as many as it has. They should be quite happy that it’s sold as many as it has and it continues to do well on the PC gaming charts.

    Each game *won’t* necessarily outsell it’s previous version. Not *everyone* is going to want this game, period.

      • Dagwood
      • 12 years ago

      Agreed 100%
      I really wish developers would stop this every stolen copy means = one retail copy lost equation.

      I get most of my games as hand-me-downs, something that can called stealing by game developers. But if I could not get most of my games for free then I would just not have as many games. A game sitting on the shelf collecting dust is just a waste. It’s no different from music, movies, concert tickets, sports tickets, clothes, food, air… well not air anyways.

      Heck, most of software I have is severly underused in my house. We have a retail copy of office, but could do everything we need to do with notepad, paint, and a cheep calculator.

        • swaaye
        • 12 years ago

        Surely you know at least one person who fulfills some part of his soul by hording/collecting media of some sort? Massive DVD collections that go unwatched? (If they are gamers, they do the same for games too usually)

        But I suppose everyone collects something.

    • Ihmemies
    • 12 years ago

    They need to make more games like Fallout, Jagged Alliance, Baldur’s Gate, Ultima, Freespace, Falcon, Star Control, Dungeon Master, Indiana Jones, Monkey Island, Thief, Deus Ex, Master of Orion, Transport Tycoon, Simcity and so on.

    Nowdays legendary games with fresh ideas and innovative gameplay aren’t really released anymore.

    Only exceptions I can now remember are Dwarf Fortress and Disciples 2. Maybe Civilization 4 too, supposing they start producing console junk like Revolutions and forget PC like others.

      • dextrous
      • 12 years ago

      transport tycoon! omg, I just played a little OpenTTD a few days ago. Been playing that game for over a decade!

      • lyc
      • 12 years ago

      i fully agree, especially about the original thief. that game was so much fun…

    • Kurotetsu
    • 12 years ago

    I watch anime, and you see alot of this exact same piracy in that genre as well. I suspect alot of pirates are teenagers or younger who have no job and parents who aren’t willing to buy the games for them (but are perfectly willing to buy them bleeding edge computers). If they are ever called on their behavior, the usual response is: “LOL! Well, I’m broke, so downloading is the only way I can get stuff!”

    If you’re broke, how do you have a computer? How do you have high-speed internet to download your stuff?

    >>I do the same actually, crap gets deleted, and what I enjoy, I buy.<<

    This sounds okay, except the vast majority of pirates don’t do this. They delete the crap they don’t like and just keep the stuff they do like, they never bother to buy them (why would you when you already have it?). Supporting the industry isn’t something that concerns them because the ‘industry’ itself is irrelevant, its only what the industry spits out that they care about (the games). This applies equally to PC, console, music, and whatever else. If the PC industry collapses (which…I don’t know, I doubt it) because of this, it’ll simply move over to console more. I already see dozens of PS2 and PS3 disc images floating around BT sites all the time.

    Its been suggested that services like Steam are a way of stemming the tide. Providing content online, for download, at a cheap price. This makes alot of sense, but I’m still skeptical as to how many people simply wouldn’t share the content on BitTorrent or IRC after getting it.

      • DASQ
      • 12 years ago

      Broken argument. Many fans of anime download fansubs simply because they would otherwise have to wait 6 months, a year, longer, just to get the studio to go through a local licensing company. Who many times take too many artistic freedoms in translation (I hate dubbing as well).

      Most fans end up buying the ones they actually like anyway. Without fansubbing, anime would barely HAVE a western market!

        • Kurotetsu
        • 12 years ago

        Hm, you’re right on the point that without fansubs there would be no anime market in the U.S. today (at least not at the size it is now).

        However, I think you’d be surprised by just how many people don’t actually buy a series once its licensed (and its usually because of points you brought up; fansubs generally have better translations and typefonts, on top of the fact of people not wanting to buy something they already got and watched for free).

        EDIT: I apologize to the mods in advance if the sudden discussion of fansubbing is too off-topic for the site.

          • DrDillyBar
          • 12 years ago

          Back in the day I did buy a few DVD’s for DBZ, but there is no way I’d buy 276 eps at ~$7 a pop! Big packs of TV show seasons for $50 are still a fairly new development.

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 12 years ago

        Then the proper response is to get a large group of people to submit a petitino to hurry up the process or open the market.

        Example, just because a band doesn’t come and tour in your town doesn’t make it legal to go and download a the DVD of the tour. Lack of opportunity is not a valid justification for performing illegal tasks.

        Ever heard the argument about silence being the best weapon? Imagine if a game company made a great game, say CoD5, but they released it with some nasty virus on it. What is the proper response? Download a virus-free copy? Nope. The proper response is to let them know that you aren’t buying their game because if their error. Do you do this by just stealing it and not paying for it? No. The game can still become a hit this way. I can’t imagine there being a worse response of a game to a developer than it just becoming part of history without being played. Especially if it could kill what is apparently a very profitable genre. Gamers need to speak with their wallets by buying what is good, but they also need to speak by their silence, by not even playing the games that aren’t good.

          • DASQ
          • 12 years ago

          Actually no one buying a game and everyone downloading is a pretty clear message: “We don’t think it’s worth anything, it’s so worthless we don’t even consider downloading it ‘theft’, make a better game.”

          Not that I’m justifying piracy, I’m saying to a developer, it shows much of the same message as not buying/owning outright.

            • green
            • 12 years ago

            l[

            • DASQ
            • 12 years ago

            I think those people just have problems determining what a ‘good’ game is vs. a ‘bad’ game.

            Good game? StarCraft. A decade later, and I still play it. Battlenet is great.

            Bad game? Bioshock. I played it once, for about 1.5-2 hours. It crashed. Never played it again. It’s still installed I think. I

    • Vexille
    • 12 years ago

    It’s amazing to me how people continue to blame the ease of piracy on the reason people continue to pirate software. How about the fact that a lot of people want to play the game…love the game…but just don’t have $50 to $60 to spend on it.

    Also, you have to consider the price of a gaming computer required to play a game such as CoD4. Some people aren’t will to spend the $50 on every game after shelling out $1400-$2000 on a system.

    Drop the price of games from $50 to $30 and I guarantee you see a huge spike in sales. However, we all know that wont happen because developers continue to bank on making technological masterpieces. Cut your overhead, offer games at lower prices…watch sales soar.

    Also…I agree with the post that MMOs are the future. Since getting into the MMO genre…the only other game genre I’ve bothered to purchase are RPGs and RTS. Why? Because I can’t beat them in 8 hours and they offer far more replay value than any FPS.

    • Mavrick88
    • 12 years ago

    I can see companies focussing on console games for sure because of the ease to get pirated games for the PC vs. consoles.

    But people here have points…..

    Why would the average user buy, besides morality (but we all know that most people don’t care about that, come on now be real) a PC game for $40-60 when they can have it free of charge? People spend good money on their computers for playing these games, of course they want to save money and “stick it to the man” even if that means the developer may be losing “millions of dollars” causing people to lose their homes and businesses to close down.

    I for one would be more into buying games if they brought down the price. I only play MMORPG’s now and most of them are free to download and play with no subscriptions fees and such. (They offer in game items for real money that make your character stronger, ect. than other users who don’t buy them and that’s how they make money; as you would know if you play them too.)

    If PC games went into the $20 range would that sell more copies? Maybe a bit more but I don’t think enough to make an impact as far as cutting down on pirating them. Because again, the same people who use the pirated games are of course going to continue to do so, why wouldn’t they. They don’t have to spend a dime. (Well maybe on blank DVDs and CDs 🙂 ).

    The PC gaming industry defianitely needs to come up with a game plan if they want to continue to supply the market. Maybe, free download of the games, option to “buy” the CD/DVD if the person has a slow net connection. Then a $10-20 charge for the CD key and come up with a better way to not allow servers or people with bad/stolen keys to play. Of course as we all know, when any security measure is in place to stop someone from doing something on a computer is put into place, most of the time on the same day; there is a hack to get around it. But it’s worth some time looking into if they are losing millions as they state.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 12 years ago

    I know with myself, there is a direct correlation between my income and my piracy level. This year, I’m in school with no job, and have pirated all the big games that came out. Last year, when I was on work term, I bought all the games I wanted to play, and a crap load of movies (probably close to $1000 worth). In years past, when I went to school and worked part time, I pirated a little, and bought a little.

    Personally, I don’t like pirating games, and will more than likely buy most of these games (UT3, Orange box, CoD4) in the summer when I’m finished University and working.

    But puhleaaase, this comment about going to consoles? Those games are just as easy to pirate now.

    • Mr Bill
    • 12 years ago

    Why not just require a dongle to play instead of a console?

      • Kunikos
      • 12 years ago

      Hell no. What if you lose your dongle? Do you want hundreds of dongles for each game in your growing library?

        • Mr Bill
        • 12 years ago

        Heh heh, A USB dongle, that would be the ticket. Put it on a hub and host a lan party.

      • A_Pickle
      • 12 years ago

      The answer is not a dongle. The answer is a Steam-like platform.

    • DukenukemX
    • 12 years ago

    r[

      • chasscF1
      • 12 years ago

      The future isn’t MMO. Why would people all of a sudden stop playing single player games. I played WOW for a while and got bored with it. I usually only buy games that have at least some single player component. The future is distribution systems like steam that give the developer control.

      • Kurotetsu
      • 12 years ago

      >>MMO games are the future. Crappy over played single player games with even crappier multi player are not the future of gaming. Every time there’s a new FPS game the only thing that changes are the maps, the models, and maybe the guns. Essentially all FPS games are Quake Team Fortress with modern graphics and sound.<<

      Crappy over played MMO games with even crappier bandwidth requirements and monthly fees are not the future of gaming. Every time there’s a new MMO game the only thing that changes are the maps, the models, and how much XP and gold you get for killing stuff. Essentially all MMO games are Everquest with modern graphics and sound.

      See the problem here?

      • A_Pickle
      • 12 years ago

      g[

    • FubbHead
    • 12 years ago

    Of course they like the console platform better, they can charge the double for their games and get away with it.

    They release games for whatever console(s) which is a) closed platform, thus usually much easier to develop for, and b) hard to “pirate”. Two good reasons to LOWER the price they charge, but do they? Nuuh-uuuh. They almost DOUBLE it! A good pointer to where it’s heading, should piracy be completely irradicated.

    There are several developers for PC that survives. They might not make millions of millions on every title, but they’re efficient enough, and releases good enough games, to survive and make a buck. Maybe some developers are just *that* bad. Maybe their business models is just bloated and extravagant?

    I think PC games today is at a price point, where worth and price go together, thus the last couple of years I’ve been buying a whole lot of games. But, there are *very* few games on any console platform that I feel is worth the money they charge for it.

    Yes, I am an apologist. But I think it’s pretty obvious why they rather develop for consoles, and blaming it *all* on PC piracy is just wrong.

    Also, I wonder… If they can identify people using pirated versions when playing on the net, why are they allowed to?

      • Corrado
      • 12 years ago

      You forget that licensing fees for consoles exist, where as they do not on a PC.

        • FubbHead
        • 12 years ago

        True, true. But I can’t imagine it amount to even close to half the game price?

    • donkeycrock
    • 12 years ago

    i pirate all my games. if i play through the entire game, i go buy it. but if i play a chapter or two, than why would i. There are hardly any games worth buying. The same can be said for movies. i havn’t bought dvd in 5 years, what a waste of money.

    the last game that i bought was orange box, quake wars, and about to buy UT3, bioshock, and crysis. and soon to get starcraft 2

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 12 years ago

      That system is morally unsound, as it is illogical. If you want to test a game out, then rent it via gamefly or something like that, or borrow a friends (and by borrow, I actually mean borrow). Same with movies. It’s really not that difficult, nor is it terribly expensive. It’s filth like you that has burdened our society into being how it is.

        • BoBzeBuilder
        • 12 years ago

        Calling him filth just because he wants to try before buy is a little too much eh?
        I do the same actually, crap gets deleted, and what I enjoy, I buy. Same as everything else in my life actually, its called 30 day return policy. Also I’m not aware of any pc game rentals where I live.

          • Vrock
          • 12 years ago

          He’s filth because he has no respect for other people’s property.

          • DASQ
          • 12 years ago

          Borrowing games is equated by the gaming industry as the same as piracy.

          You’re morally unsound too.

          Looks like you’re both going to hell.

        • Kunikos
        • 12 years ago

        Let me know when you can rent PC games.

          • SPOOFE
          • 12 years ago

          It’ll probably happen when people stop pirating PC games.

      • format_C
      • 12 years ago

      What are demos for?

        • DASQ
        • 12 years ago

        Most if not all demo’s are crippled misrepresentations of the game’s final product.

          • Xaser04
          • 12 years ago

          Rubbish,

          The last 4 demos I downloaded (COD4, Crysis, UT3, QW:ET) have all been representative of the final product.

            • DASQ
            • 12 years ago

            I forgot to mention the exception in the case that the final game sucks, the demo sucking has no bearing.

            UT3 was crap. I played the demo, I didn’t want it. I played the final game once, I wanted it even less.

            Crysis? Demo was alright, final product was disappointing. Demo had the advantage of coming first, so most of my ‘oohs’ and ‘aaahs’ were already spent when I started playing the full game. I’m shocked I even completed the single player storyline. Far Cry is still more fun.

            Call of Duty 4 wasn’t too bad though, I never actually played the demo, I more or less heard nothing about it until it was released and just picked it up then.

            No experience with QW:ET, but from everything I hear, it’s floppy.

      • donkeycrock
      • 12 years ago

      demos are great but they really don’t let you know how fun the game is, usually the demo is one stage, not enough to convince me to spend 50 dollars.

      • YeuEmMaiMai
      • 12 years ago

      you’re the reason games are 50+ a pop. I hope someone rips you off so you know what it feels like.

    • Unckmania
    • 12 years ago

    I believe that most of this piracy takes place outside the US. I Live in Mexico myself, and i must say, i haven’t found a single legal copy of CoD4 in retail stores. However, each and every piracy stands in my city have it.
    The only way i could get a legal copy of COD4 would be by buying it on the internet and have it delivered. That, for me, is a very good soltion as i normally buy things online. But most people in my country wouldn’t dare buy things on the internet.
    Prices have actually dropped in PC games. But we still don’t have proper retail stores to get them. So pirates are leaps ahead. And i’m talking of US’s next door neighbor. Think of China, South America and any other place with low income population and the situation must be even harder to try and be legal.

    • Krogoth
    • 12 years ago

    Piracy isn’t the problem.

    The problem is that basically the PC gaming industry has overshoot its market.

    The majority of former PC gamers (people that grew up with 80s-90s PC stuff) no longer have the time or $$$$ to spend on games, tweaking rigs and such.

    They settle for a PS3, 360 console that provide good enough IQ, framerate without the hassle of having latest drivers or getting that latest generation of GPU for $200-599 every six months to a year. Their PC converts to a general purpose rig that may do some emulation with some ancient gaming titles. They may even get an Apple!

    The current generation of young gamers (teens and young adults) grew up with N64, PS1 and PS2. They have more of a connection with gaming consoles then with gaming PCs. It is really no surprise that current console marketshare by far outweights PC gaming market.

    It is a big win for developers to focus on gaming consoles. They have predictable hardware which makes far easier to make a stable, relatively buggy-free code without spending tons of time and $$$$ on QA.

    The largest problem is what I call a “Creativity plateau” which affects both console and PC gaming industry. It is the same thing that also affected music and film industries for years.

    It because very difficult to innovate when there are already ton of ideas that are already been used and b[

      • PerfectCr
      • 12 years ago

      Your post describes me perfectly.

        • Krogoth
        • 12 years ago

        I know quite a few former hardcore PC gamers that converted to 360, PS3, Wii and an Apple.

        They pretty much all said “I have other things to worry about and really do not have the time, energy or $$$ to spend on a performance gaming rig. “

      • emkubed
      • 12 years ago

      I think your post pretty much sums it up. Very good post, Krogoth.

      • Madman
      • 12 years ago

      Yea… 100$ for COD4, 500$ for 8800, 500$ for PC, 300$ for LCD, 150$ for Windows and you get like 24 hours of game play…

      I much rather play old dos games nowadays, free and more fun!

        • Kurotetsu
        • 12 years ago

        Eh, thats only if you insist on having only the most highest-end hardware. As much as people like pluscard love throwing about AMD propoganda, he makes some very good points. The cost of PC hardware is going down while performance is going up. It seems like chip and motherboard makers are focusing alot on low-power and efficieny, look at Gigabyte’s new Dynamic Energy Saver boards that are coming out, or the low wattage numbers of some of Intel’s and AMD’s chips.

        Right now, I think it really is possible to build a complete system for roughly the same price as a console (somewhere between $500 and $700 I think?). You get something that can compete with a console in gaming and still be used for a variety of tasks that consoles simply can’t perform, like media encoding, web design, or office productivity.

        I think the continuing trend of low power + low price + high performance of PC parts will eventually cause a swing in preference away from the console; especially since the opening price of progressively more advanced consoles continues to increase (remember the $700 opening price for the PS3?).

          • FubbHead
          • 12 years ago

          Yep. It seems pretty oblivious to people how weak the hardware in these next-gen consoles really are, compared to yesterday-gen PC hardware. They often rely on up-scaling to even produce 720p resolutions.

      • UberGerbil
      • 12 years ago

      Ideas can’t be copyrighted. If they could be, wouldn’t you expect to see /[

      • Lazier_Said
      • 12 years ago

      That’s part of it.

      Another part is that 5 years ago, PC games were much more complex – enabled by a display you could read easily read text on and a standard controller with 101 buttons.

      Now most major PC games are multiplatform projects intended for a port to Xbox from day one, so they simplify all the complexity and most of the depth out. There’s no reason to put up with driver issues and crashes and constant upgrades to play the exact same game you get with a cheap console that just works.

        • Krogoth
        • 12 years ago

        Well the PS3’s support for keyboard and mice kinda throws a curveball in that argument.

          • swaaye
          • 12 years ago

          No it doesn’t. How many people have a keyboard and mouse on their console? Other consoles have had mice and keyboards before. Console companies are never going to make a game that truly requires those components.

          We are definitely on a slippery slope where the most complex platform is getting sloppy seconds more often than ever before. Consoles have become a way to offer generally watered down previously PC-only genres to the masses for cheap. Mainly action games, of course. 360’s and PS3’s lineups are “impressively” lopsided towards action.

        • Usacomp2k3
        • 12 years ago

        I’d say more like 10-12 years ago. Back in the era of Silent Service II, and many of the old games that had keyboard cutouts because they really did use every key on the keyboard.

        Honestly my first reaction was that you were full of something, but then as I got thinking about it, I completely agree. Well said, my friend.

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 12 years ago

    How can pirates play online? Why would game developers allow that? Shouldn’t they confirm the CD key with their database or something?

      • lethal
      • 12 years ago

      that’s exactly what I was thinking. All games I know of check both if your cd key is original and if the game’s .exe isn’t modified. While not impossible to bypass, the online component shouldn’t be available to the vast majority of pirated copies, specially this early.

      • StashTheVampede
      • 12 years ago

      Servers that bypass the key check and are public.

        • Spotpuff
        • 12 years ago

        Blizzard had a similar problem and had the servers shut down; it shouldn’t be that hard. But it’s probably harder than it sounds.

        • Kunikos
        • 12 years ago

        Then track the IPs in the same way people find them to play the game on the server, contact FBI Internet Task Force and get the ISPs to fork over the customer’s information. Then proceed with civil and/or criminal charges.

          • StashTheVampede
          • 12 years ago

          It’s easy to take down a server, no doubt. IW would have to shut down dozens of servers in order for it to have impact. Their time would be *better* spent on an update to the version of the game so the current cracks fail.

    • AntiOmni
    • 12 years ago

    Its amazing how huge COD 4 has become. I wouldn’t have thought that it would be as popular as it is. I guess with the amount of advertising they did…

      • lyc
      • 12 years ago

      yeah they should be happy people are actually playing these war ’em up games at a time when most people are sick and tired of wars…

    • DrDillyBar
    • 12 years ago

    I know people who blatantly copy games to their HDD’s on consoles, it’s hardly impossible.
    On the other hand, if they can track CD keys like that, why are they not kicking known bad key’s off the game servers? The next patch could outright disable the game for those key’s as far as I’m concerned. I paid for my COD4.

      • Mavrick88
      • 12 years ago

      Just like someone said earlier, but I hate to repeat….

      There are public servers that bypass key checking and/or game.exe files. They still show up on normal servers and anyone can join in.

    • Nitrodist
    • 12 years ago

    What, like it’s hard to pirate games for consoles now?

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 12 years ago

      Certainly harder than PC’s.

        • Krogoth
        • 12 years ago

        True, but you just need a steady hand and a ironing solder. 😉

          • DukenukemX
          • 12 years ago

          There’s a hack to the CD drive that doesn’t require anything but a PC and some basic cables. At least for the X360.

            • A_Pickle
            • 12 years ago

            Do you have a link?

            • eitje
            • 12 years ago

            I think a link to that would be against TR’s T&Cs.

        • marvelous
        • 12 years ago

        Definitely not hard to pirate console games. If you are tech savvy you can easily mod a console to play pirate games or get someone to mod it for you. Then again on the PC all you have to do is download a pirate version and install it.

          • SGT Lindy
          • 12 years ago

          For joe user its harder. Joe user can get a copy of a cracked PC game from a friend.

          Joe user probably is not going to let his buddy crack open his new 360 and bust out his radio shack special soldering iron.

          It can be done by its harder plain and simple. The goes along way to stop joe user. Hard core, immoral, geek thief will stop at nothing.

      • SPOOFE
      • 12 years ago

      The higher sales of console games lessen the impact of piracy.

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