Adobe joins Linux Foundation

Could this be the first step to a version of Photoshop for Linux? Perhaps it’s too early to say, but the fact remains: Adobe has joined the Linux Foundation. As PC World reports, the software firm announced its move together with the alpha release of its Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) web application platform for Linux.

The AIR platform is a runtime environment that combines Adobe Flash, Adobe Flex, HTML, and Ajax (asynchronous JavaScript and XML) technologies and allows developers to roll web applications into full-featured desktop apps. Companies working with AIR today include AOL, eBay, NASDAQ, and Nickelodeon. The AIR runtime runs on Mac OS X and Windows, but Adobe says the new Linux version is “alpha quality” and not yet feature-complete. For now, Linux users will have to do without functionality like printing, multi-monitor support, and digital rights management support in AIR applications.

Despite having officially joined the likes of Google, HP, IBM, and Nokia in the ranks of the Linux Foundation, Adobe is withholding the source code for AIR. Furthermore, as PC World points out, the license agreement for the Linux version of AIR forbids attempts to “reverse engineer, decompile, disassemble or otherwise attempt to discover the source code of the software.”

Comments closed
    • Jeffery
    • 12 years ago

    The thing I really want to see on linux is a solid NLE. Sony Vegas is the only real app that I still boot into windows for. Harumph.

    • UberGerbil
    • 12 years ago

    I suspect Adobe wants to convince Linux users that their online Photoshop version is the way to go.

    Mind you, desktop Photoshop needs a major re-design from the bottom up (to go 64bit, get rid of their hand-rolled internal virtual memory management, etc) so doing a Linux build as part of that would be an easy thing to add. Then again, they’ve claimed they see no need for any of that. But a major rewrite with a Linux version that just “falls out” of the process is really the only way I see that happening.

      • stdRaichu
      • 12 years ago

      Not sure if I’m reading your post right as I don’t follow photoshop, but did Adobe really say they don’t forsee any need for a 64bit build…?! I mean, I know the PS codebase is probably a saturnine mess but aren’t alot of people going to be getting dangerously close to the 2GB (unless it has 3GB support) in a solely 32bit version?

      Would love to see them do it in a more platform agnostic fashion so that it’d run with a minimum of fuss on any x86 UNIX but I wouldn’t hold my breath ๐Ÿ˜‰ In any case, google saw it worth their while to improve WINE to the state that it could run CS2 nicely.

        • UberGerbil
        • 12 years ago

        Yeah, one of their senior developers said in a blog post that they’d experimented with 64bit and it didn’t offer much
        ยง[<http://blogs.adobe.com/scottbyer/2006/12/64_bitswhen.html<]ยง PS is Large Address Aware, so they can get 3GB of VAS (4GB on a 64bit OS) and they do their own goofy virtual memory management (hence their "scratch file") so it's probably true that they're less pressured by memory limits than most apps that work with that much data. I suspect that if they re-architected from scratch they'd see a big performance gain, but that's a huge amount of work, and big/huge < 1 On the other hand, I wouldn't be surprised if they have a team doing just that (especially now that both Win-x64 and OSX-x64 are out), but they don't want to talk about it and they want to minimize the perceived benefits until it is ready (which could be years).

    • Lord.Blue
    • 12 years ago

    Sounds good. I look forward to future releases from them. Maybe they can get Flash, Photoshop, Fireworks, Director, Illustrator, and more into Linux and really make a multimedia development suite for Linux.

      • stmok
      • 12 years ago

      They’ve had a couple of years to do it, and they’ve never done it. (Often given pathetic excuses…I’ve heard is all). What makes you think they’ll support Linux now with their main line of applications?

      The only way to put Adobe into a different perspective about Linux, is to start your own open source equivalent applications. It turns the situation around into a competitive one.

      Their natural reaction is to first play you down, then mock you, then take you seriously and fight you, and when they realise its futile (as it gradually starts eating into their marketshare), they’ll either try to play nice with you or fold up their tents and go home. (once they’ve bled enough of their reserves fighting you).

        • Master Kenobi
        • 12 years ago

        Enjoy Adobe’s buggy software on Linux now too ๐Ÿ˜›

        In all seriousness though, this is likely just to make their web enabled stripdown apps work on Linux. Don’t expect full blown photoshop and the like on Linux.

        • stdRaichu
        • 12 years ago

        True. I’ve never seen anything blow such huge chunks as the flash plugin on Linux.

        There was a blog post that came out some years ago after a bunch of Linux users complained that they were being marginalised what with their still being no flash 9 for linux whereupon the adobe devs moaned this-and-that is so hard to do in Linux!

        Cue a hundred comments of alot of Linux devs going “No! That’s not the right way to do it!”. Annoyingly enough I can’t find it now. But it helps explain why I’ve seen a fullscreen youtube video bring a 2.6GHz Penryn to its knees.

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