Intel displays ‘Moorestown’ motherboard

At Computex last year, folks from VIA Technologies showed us an entire x86 PC motherboard no bigger than a business card. The board, which was based on VIA’s Mobile-ITX form factor, combined a 600MHz VIA C7 processor and a single-chip chipset with integrated graphics.

At the ongoing Intel Developer Forum, Intel Ultra mobility group Senior VP and General Manager Anand Chandrasekhar has outdone VIA by presenting a motherboard that’s even smaller than the Taiwanese company’s Mobile-ITX product. As Engadget reports, Intel’s board is designed to house Intel’s upcoming Moorestown processorโ€”the successor to Silverthorneโ€”and it actually looks a little smaller than a credit card. The board Chandrasekhar showed wasn’t populated with chips yet, but it’s designed to accommodate a processor, chipset, 3G cellular radio, Wi-Fi controller, Bluetooth chip, GPS, and memory.

A Moorestown motherboard. Source: Intel.

Moorestown is scheduled for the 2009-2010 time frame, and according to Chandrasekhar’s presentation (PDF), it will mark Intel’s first entry into cell phone form factors. Intel expects Moorestown to trim idle power consumption tenfold compared to the Menlow platform, which Intel launched yesterday under the Centrino Mobile brand.

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    • FireGryphon
    • 12 years ago

    What’s the connection between Intel and American Express? Can they legally show each other’s trademarks in press shots like that? I’ve never seen cross-products like that before.

      • UberGerbil
      • 12 years ago

      There’s no connection AFAIK. And it’s legal. It’s only a problem if AmEx objects — and if you go look at that slide from the PDF, down at the bottom there’s the usual disclaimer “Other brand names are the property of their respective owners.”

    • Mourmain
    • 12 years ago

    Ugh, page 25 of that PDF is “One more thing” on a black background. Steve Jobs should trademark his turtleneck before Intel starts wearing that too.

      • Shinare
      • 12 years ago

      The hottie on page 24 is more interesting.

        • Mourmain
        • 12 years ago

        Oh yeah, she’s totally open to the classical “so what processor architecture you got there, x86 or ARM?” approach.

        Make sure to punctuate the “x” with an eyebrow-flick. And roll the ARrrM.

    • cygnus1
    • 12 years ago

    did they mention anything about storage connectivity and ram capacity?

    • Hattig
    • 12 years ago

    This is that new meaning of “outdone” where you show a picture of something and compare it to working actual hardware a competitor showed a year ago?

    Yeah, it’s nice. Yeah, the chips look small. Show me them working.

    • provoko
    • 12 years ago

    G M Roeglin is getting PWNED!

      • b4b2
      • 12 years ago

      Too bad it expired in ’04. ๐Ÿ™‚

        • Anonymous Hamster
        • 12 years ago

        No, that’s not the expiration date. That’s the “member since” date.

        Probably from that you can guess the current expiration year.
        Then you just need 12 tries to guess the month.
        (Perhaps fewer if you know how Amex comes up with card numbers.)

          • b4b2
          • 12 years ago

          ooooh, I see now. I couldn’t really read the tiny print. Hmmmm, I wonder if he/she has any money now? lol

    • Shinare
    • 12 years ago

    I may be missing the point here, but I’m not too sure what the excitement here is about. I’m relativly sure that my Mio GPS has a small motherboard in it with a samsung processor, chipset, video processor, flashdisk, bluetooth, GPS nav chipset etc. And I wouldn’t call this thing huge by any means.

      • Cyril
      • 12 years ago

      This is x86.

        • Thresher
        • 12 years ago

        And this is a good thing?

          • Meadows
          • 12 years ago

          Yes, as it will be capable of everything your average computer can perform, rather than needing their specialized software and running little else.

            • ew
            • 12 years ago

            Really? Are you saying I’m going to be able to throw a copy of Photoshop CS2 on there and use it? Or how about MS Office. That would be so awesome and practical to be able to run those on a hand held!

            • Turkina
            • 12 years ago

            CS2 and other x86 applications you, the user, interact with are only a tiny fraction of the x86 code base. My take on this is that the real win here is the ability to recycle core x86 code, and use standard x86 tool chains. Yes, some applications (web browsers, etc) will benefit from this, but the simplification of the development process, and unifying underlying architecture support is the real issue here.

            • ew
            • 12 years ago

            There are plenty of good libraries and tool chains that work on many architectures. I don’t think I’ve ever written a piece of code in my entire professional carrier that requires x86 or is dependent on something that only would work on x86.

            • UberGerbil
            • 12 years ago

            There are a few binaries out in the world that mobile OEMs would like to be able to run on their equipment, starting with Adobe Flash.

            However, I share a general lack of enthusiasm until somebody demonstrates there’s an actual market at this particular Watt & Price point. ARM-based solutions are cheaper, better-integrated, and lower power. VIA solutions may be more powerful. And the mobile OEMs really want Adobe Flash (etc) on cell phones, which is a lower Watt point than all of the above. With Intel’s weight behind it something may shake out, but right now it looks like their throwing something, hard, against the wall with the hope that something will stick.

    • eitje
    • 12 years ago

    you really want to stress the fact that it’s upcoming, don’t you? ๐Ÿ˜‰

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